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 > Your search for posts made by 'RambleOnNW' found 69 matches.

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RE: Heavy Class C Tire thoughts

Sorry to say but all E rated tires of a certain size by any brand have the exact same max load carrying capacity when inflated to 80 psi. Actually not. You can see from the Michelin load tables that the dual application of the C-Metric 225/75-R16C has 1000 lbs. more per pair or 2000 lbs. more per 4 rear tires at 80 psi. 5950 vs. 4940 lbs. per pair. https://www.rvsafety.com/images/pdf/michelinloadandinflationrvtruck.pdfBut the Michelin 225/75-R16C is not an E rated tire. You are trying to compare apples to oranges. So what Load Range do you think it is? It says right in the table it is an LRE. ... But tire retailers aren't quite this savvy, so they fall back on what is familiar - Load Ranges - and label these C type tires with Load Ranges (incorrectly!) I hope that explains things. It is not just tire retailers that call the C-Metric tire a Load Range E. Michelin themselves market the Michelin Agilis CrossClimate 225/75-R16C LRE as a Load Range E: https://www.michelinb2b.com/wps/b2bcontent/PDF/AGILIS_CROSSCLIMATE_B2B_product_sheet.pdf
RambleOnNW 10/04/21 04:24pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Heavy Class C Tire thoughts

Sorry to say but all E rated tires of a certain size by any brand have the exact same max load carrying capacity when inflated to 80 psi. Actually not. You can see from the Michelin load tables that the dual application of the C-Metric 225/75-R16C has 1000 lbs. more per pair or 2000 lbs. more per 4 rear tires at 80 psi. 5950 vs. 4940 lbs. per pair. https://www.rvsafety.com/images/pdf/michelinloadandinflationrvtruck.pdfBut the Michelin 225/75-R16C is not an E rated tire. You are trying to compare apples to oranges. So what Load Range do you think it is? It says right in the table it is an LRE.
RambleOnNW 10/02/21 09:46pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Heavy Class C Tire thoughts

Sorry to say but all E rated tires of a certain size by any brand have the exact same max load carrying capacity when inflated to 80 psi. Actually not. You can see from the Michelin load tables that the dual application of the C-Metric 225/75-R16C has 1000 lbs. more per pair or 2000 lbs. more per 4 rear tires at 80 psi. 5950 vs. 4940 lbs. per pair. https://www.rvsafety.com/images/pdf/michelinloadandinflationrvtruck.pdf
RambleOnNW 09/30/21 06:36pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Heavy Class C Tire thoughts

I think I'm sold on these. The weight capacity seems pretty great and price is ok. Capacity appears higher that regular E rated tire maybe due to commercial rating. Michelin - Agilis CrossClimate 225/75R16C 121/120R LRE https://tires.costco.com/product?ItemNo=1331851 I looked at those too and it will be interesting to hear how they turn out. Those tires check a lot of boxes, sidewall protection, true all-season with Mountain snowflake winter rating, weight rating. Note that the C-Metric version has a directional tread whereas the non-C metric version does not. So each dual set of wheels will have to have a left and right tire? What to use for a spare, a non- C-metric Agilis? For me it was go with what you know. Bridgestone all-steel cased tires were dependable for 8 years and the tire weight of 51 pounds.
RambleOnNW 09/30/21 04:18pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 2012 Winnebago Access Premier, Ford F450 V10

Wrench icon indicates “Limp Mode”. Some capability has been disabled but you are still able to limp along. Good thing to carry a Scan Guage II in your toolbox on trips to do basic diagnostics. Plugs into the diagnostic port below the dash at the steering column.
RambleOnNW 09/28/21 09:47pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Heavy Class C Tire thoughts

I like the all-steel cased commercial grade tires like the Michelin Rib or in our case we run a set of Bridgestone Duravis R238s. All LT225/75R-16 tires have to pass the same testing in the NHTSA FMVSS 139 test. But I believe you get more design margin in a heavier all-steel cased commercial tire. The all-steel cased tires weigh 9-10 lbs more per tire than the non-steel cased tires and I like riding on 25% more tire. Our previous set we ran for 8 years, a set of Bridgestone Duravis M895s. Great tires, never let us down but no longer offered by Bridgestone. M+S rated unlike our current All-Season tires. Similar to the no longer available Goodyear G947 RSS Armor MAX. I don’t know of any good all-steel cased commercial M+S tires. Possibly the Michelin XPS Traction which had a more aggressive tread.
RambleOnNW 09/28/21 08:00am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Solar panels vs shade cloth

I don’t have RV solar panels but do have them at home. During the super hot weather I measured the temperature on the underside of our uninsulated garage roof using an IR thermometer. The underside of the north side was 118F and the underside of the south side below the solar panels was 107F. The panels are elevated off the roof 5”.
RambleOnNW 07/02/21 12:56pm Tech Issues
RE: Maintaining air pressure in your tires

We run with the Borg dually solid metal long stems on the rear with TST TPMS. Have been running this more than 10 years. TPMS allows a quick check for any slow leaks after stopped at destination and also the sensors will immediately broadcast a fast leak warning if it occurs. I had belt separation on an inner dual and got warning on the TST TPMS. The warning came in the form of the inner dual pressure starting to increase as the tire diameter started to increase and unloaded the outside tire. Fortunately we were 200 yards from a tire store when the tire started to disintegrate. Limped over at 5 mph. I am on my second set of much tougher all steel cased commercial tires as a result. The TPMS allows comparing the tires in real-time while driving and learn to read the tire characteristics of each position. Have noted the following characteristics from over 10 years of glance observations: 1) Slightly increased pressure of inner vs outer tire. 2) Heating from tailpipe. 3) Heating from sun shining on one side vs other 4) Typical pressure rise 5) Pressure rise due to hot asphalt highways in summer 6) Much hotter running front tires due to engine proximity and sensors on short stems close to wheels
RambleOnNW 06/27/21 10:31am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Sad state of national parks and forests - II

And while it may not be nearly enough, look at what the other party has actually given from their own pockets, from Obama, to SlowJoe to Harris, NONE give as much as Trump did. You may not like him, but from a personal standpoint, he has done/donated more than any others for the last 30 years. You’ve got things entirely backwards. The truth
RambleOnNW 06/21/21 03:57pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: The importance of a TPMS Tire Pressure Monitoring System

I have never lost a tire from a slow leak. Always cord separation or total failure. I had belt separation on an inner dual and got warning on the TST TPMS. The warning came in the form of the inner dual pressure starting to increase as the tire diameter started to increase and unloaded the outside tire. Fortunately we were 200 yards from a tire store when the tire started to disintegrate. Limped over at 5 mph. I am on my second set of much tougher all steel cased commercial tires as a result. The TPMS allows comparing the tires in real-time while driving and learn to read the tire characteristics of each position: 1) Slightly increased pressure of inner vs outer tire. 2) Heating from tailpipe. 3) Heating from sun shining on one side vs other 4) Typical pressure rise 5) Pressure rise due to hot asphalt highways in summer 6) Much hotter running front tires due to engine proximity and sensors on short stems close to wheels
RambleOnNW 06/20/21 07:39pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Sad state of national parks and forests - II

When Donald Trump was President, he donated his annual salary to the Nat'l Park Service. Not a lot of money to the NPS total budget, but nice gesture showing he was aware of their problems. Indeed a nice gesture. And he added some more of his own from his personal wealth to round it off to $100,00 since it's just $78,000. I'm not one to tell anyone what to do with their own money, but I would have preferred his administration did not cut $2 billion out of the national parks budget while giving big business $1 trillon in tax cuts that promised economic boom that did not happen. And a bit of irony, it's when the NPS is asking for funds just to address these maintenance backlogs. 3 card monte......wish people would learn. $750.00, that's seven hundred and fifty dollars, in federal taxes for a YEAR. Yes and presidential salary is $400,000 not $78,000. Plus $50,000 for expenses.
RambleOnNW 06/19/21 02:52pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Generators!! Yes YOU!

The Victron 15A looks good with separate battery and load outputs. Great for using the unused panel output once the batteries are getting charged up. I'm trying to picture in my head how this would work... I thought most RV setups had the 'loads' and the 'battery' all tied together (over simplified, I realize), whether via terminal connections, bus bars, etc. Or would this be for where there is a 'house' battery bank, and a 'starter' (vehicle) battery? Thanks, Monte I have looked around a bit so here’s my understanding. The load output control is programmable based on the solar and battery state. So yes. charge the chassis battery when the house batteries are full and the solar is active. Or control a relay switching a load attached to the battery.
RambleOnNW 06/18/21 12:31am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Generators!! Yes YOU!

Ramble, your portable solar setup is real close to what I would/will add to our 2005 24ft. E450 Class C! I'll probably never use a portable with it's controller at the panel. I'd use an MPPT controller at the batteries permanently so that voltage loss between the panel and the coach batteries will be minimum at all times. The V10 idles so quietly, charges coach batteries so fast via the alternator, and only consumes about 0.7 gal of fuel per hour when idling ... that I've been doing that a lot lately and wondering if I even want to add any solar. Our camping style is usually only short stays at any one place, so the batteries get topped up when driving between locations. pnichols - We are totally satisfied with our setup for our low power daily needs. We were at a cold high Cascade lake in the trees with the panels 160’ away on the lakeshore in the early morning sun producing 9.2A with controller at the battery. This was enough to run our furnace and still charge the battery. With a 40’ cable it produces 11.2A. You will still have the 2 volt drop with the controller at the battery except the drop is off the higher panel voltage. MPPT would be great however we don’t need the additional 20% power. The Victron 15A looks good with separate battery and load outputs. Great for using the unused panel output once the batteries are getting charged up. The spec on the controller not starting until panel voltage is battery voltage + 5 volts may be an issue with this panel setup. The 2 panels in the solar suitcase are wired in parallel not serial. V10 backup is great for gen. The control board on the auto transfer switch failed one time while we were at Mt. Rainier so gen output would not switch in so used the V10 to charge. Did not bring the solar that time as we assumed the tree canopy would too shading. Turns out that there was sun available but would need more line.
RambleOnNW 06/13/21 04:35pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Generators!! Yes YOU!

Ramble, that's a great setup!! Two quick questions (not to hijack the thread). First, which brand of suitcase did you get? Second, with a 160 foot cable run, do you experience any significant voltage drop? And (to bring it back on topic after my borderline hijack), if I had a setup like yours, I would be more willing to leave my generator home!! ;) Profdant139 - I have a Renogy 200 watt. Open it is 36” high x 52” long. They have a lighter taller narrower one but it won’t fit in storage. I have a 2nd controller to locate near the batteries that I use for the 160’ run case since the 0.2 ohm estimated wire resistance implies a 2 volt drop. Most of the time I just use 40’ with the built in controller. I like to keep the setup flexible to use to charge the chassis battery or other batteries. Cold camping we run our gen before 10pm and crank the heat up so the furnace doesn’t kick in for a few hours.
RambleOnNW 06/05/21 07:04pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Generators!! Yes YOU!

80% of our camping is dry camping. With 200 watt suitcase solar and 160’ of 8 AWG solar cable in 3 segments we park in the shade and put the solar in the sun. Some days we don’t run the generator at all. Other days we run it for coffee, microwave.
RambleOnNW 06/05/21 11:25am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Tranny fluid change

I’ve got the Ford TorqShift with the external bypass filter in a housing and it’s quite frozen. Couldn’t crack it loose with a 1/2” rachet and didn’t want to break something. Thinking about trying to use a filter wrench on the filter housing along with the rachet on the end nut. Any tips?
RambleOnNW 05/28/21 11:18pm Tow Vehicles
RE: F150 Lightening

A hydrogen fueled truck would make a lot more sense. The battery trucks will require an hour charging for every 150-200 miles of driving. What is needed is fueling stations. Take a look at this hydrogen SUV. 380 mile range, 4000 lb. towing, and 5 minute refueling: https://www.hyundaiusa.com/us/en/vehicles/nexo/compare-specs The Nexo is nice. But holy carp, talk about expensive fuel. And presently very hard to find. Still, nice little SUV. Cheaper than diesel green hydrogen is on the way. It takes around 58 kWh to generate a kg of hydrogen and with power purchase agreements dropping to 2 cents/kWh as in the following link the raw generation costs will drop. https://emp.lbl.gov/pv-ppa-prices
RambleOnNW 05/23/21 10:51am Tow Vehicles
RE: F150 Lightening

Hydrogen race truck planned for 2023 Baja 1000: https://www.offroadxtreme.com/features/interviews/showdown-scg-says-hydrogen-powered-boot-could-beat-tesla-cybertruck/
RambleOnNW 05/22/21 12:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing with a 2019 Honda CRV/Subaru Impreza

Subaru Ascent would make more sense. 5000 lb./2300 kg. tow rating.
RambleOnNW 05/22/21 12:21pm Tow Vehicles
RE: F150 Lightening

A hydrogen fueled truck would make a lot more sense. The battery trucks will require an hour charging for every 150-200 miles of driving. What is needed is fueling stations. Take a look at this hydrogen SUV. 380 mile range, 4000 lb. towing, and 5 minute refueling: https://www.hyundaiusa.com/us/en/vehicles/nexo/compare-specs
RambleOnNW 05/22/21 12:07pm Tow Vehicles
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