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RE: Teacher's Pet

I am so very sorry to hear of Terry's passing. He was a valued member here and we'll miss him very much. Scott
ScottG 10/15/20 02:46pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Help ID'ing tub

If the pan is fiberglass, why not repair it? It really isn’t difficult and you’ll have it out, anyway. Then you could reinforce it however you want. It’s definitely a design I’ve never noticed before. And yeah, it shouldn’t have split. Good luck with it. RVing is such an adventure, isn’t it? Apparently all RV pans are made out of plastic (ABS) rather than the fiberglass that's used EVERYPLACE else. It's about 1/16" thick and frankly, I don't know how it lasted this long. This is the 4th RV we've had over 30+ years with a shower and the first that has failed. Manufacturers seem to stay up nights figuring out how to make stuff ever more junky.
ScottG 08/25/20 09:06am Travel Trailers
RE: 10K psi grease gun

Deleted
ScottG 08/24/20 04:55pm Tech Issues
RE: Help ID'ing tub

Path, I think you're right about the brand and thanks for the link. I can just see the white logo thingy in the back corner. Northwood will sell me a new tub at a reasonable price. I need another large item from them so I'm going to drive to Oregon to save shipping/crating on everything. Kip, this is the only combo unit of this size and has a very distinct shape. Trying to use something else would require a new surround ($$$) and take drastic surgery. I'm going to fiberglass (or have it done) the area that's weak to keep this from happening again. It should not have cracked under my 164# frame!
ScottG 08/24/20 03:40pm Travel Trailers
RE: Help ID'ing tub

Thank Path, their website is a little lacking but I'll contact them if I can't get info elsewhere. Scott
ScottG 08/23/20 09:39pm Travel Trailers
Help ID'ing tub

My tub cracked and I'd like to replace (not repair) and reinforce it so it doesn't happen again. I can probably get it from Northwood but I'd like to have options. I need help identifying the make/model. https://i.imgur.com/R8od10o.jpg?1 https://i.imgur.com/ZODL0li.jpg?1 Note that it's very similar to the Pellandant/Fleetwood model but the dimensions are different. Also, any idea what caulk they use? It doesn't seem like silicone and it doesn't attract dirt. Thanks in advance.
ScottG 08/23/20 03:36pm Travel Trailers
RE: Water Heater Gas Supply Line

The gas line generally goes through the floor and down to a black iron pipe. You could disconnect it at the pipe and run a new line or simply use the approriate fitting to splice onto the old brass line and lengthen it. I would like to connect to it where it comes up through the floor. The old one is the right length, but has the wrong fitting on the water heater end. I am just trying to figure out if I can buy this line, or if I need to make a new one. It seems like it is a pretty common connection. There are lines used to make flexible connections to residential water heaters and furnaces but they aren't designed for the rigors of RV use - or at least, I've never seen them in one. The safest bet is to make up a new line. Some old hardware stores still sell flexible 3/8's line by the foot. They may even be willing to flare the ends for you and direct you to the correct style of coupling. It bends pretty easy if done slowly and with care making sure to stop if it starts to kink. EDIT: I see the old line takes a pretty sharp turn getting to the WH fitting. You shold be able to save that section and splice it back togeher. Or, you could use some brass fittings to make those sharp turns.
ScottG 04/11/20 12:15pm Tech Issues
RE: Help Identifying things in my RV

Seems like a lot of wires for a B/U alarm! Not really, not for "backup alarm" as in a sonar or similar system to detect when you're getting close to an obstacle. There's a power input on the right, what I assume is a lead to the buzzer or whatever on the instrument panel, and a few connectors (A, B, and D) for the sensors. For a backup beeper such as trucks and construction equipment have, then yes it's a lot more wires than one would expect. That would typically just be a little noisemaker box wired to the reverse light circuit, and have no separate control box. Given the little picture of a cartoon car emitting wi-fi, I think a sonar backup sensor system is a very good guess. Yeah, that's a different animal. I was just thinking the beep thing.
ScottG 04/11/20 11:13am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Just curious......

Avg is about 11.5 or maybe a little more. We do a lot of mountain driving though.
ScottG 04/11/20 11:10am Travel Trailers
RE: Water Heater Gas Supply Line

The gas line generally goes through the floor and down to a black iron pipe. You could disconnect it at the pipe and run a new line or simply use the approriate fitting to splice onto the old brass line and lengthen it.
ScottG 04/11/20 11:08am Tech Issues
RE: POWER PANEL went blank. Generator the same

I wonder if your battery died/shorted and took out the reverse polarity fuses in the converter.
ScottG 04/11/20 11:06am Tech Issues
RE: Problems with past RV Parks you've stayed at?

Haven't really had any problems in a very long time. Night time noise would probably be the biggest complaint but it seems to be a rare occurance anymore.
ScottG 04/11/20 11:01am Family Camping
RE: Slide - In or Out

I think it's marginally better for them to be in but since I'm in and out of there all winter doing projects and such, I leave the main slide out. Either way isn't a game changer IMHO.
ScottG 04/11/20 10:47am Travel Trailers
RE: Weight Distribution with sway control question

Well Larry, as a retired engineer I do understand how such things work and I can explain how lateral force is generated but I don't think you're open to a civil discussion about it. So, there's no reason for me to attempt to do so. We'll just have to agree to disagree. One thing is for certain, there is absolutely no friction material employed in the DC. Good luck to you. Again IMO you clearly have demonstrated a true lack of understanding of these systems since the Equal-i-zer just like the DC Cam also has no friction material either. Both using the metal to metal friction with the DC Cam only using "sliding friction" whereas the Equal-i-zer uses both "rotational" friction from the sockets along with "sliding" friction from the bars in the "L" brackets. Also anytime I see someone trying to use some vague education or experience credentials like your "retired engineer" reference often tells me one has no valid or verifiable position on a subject. While I could try and support my input on the subject being discussed here by saying I have and "actual" masters degree in engineering, but my degree is in "systems engineering" which has no real direct application to the topic of this thread so I don't go there. Thus, I quoted a real mechanical engineer that as Hunting has metioned has posted extensively on various mechanical based subject over a number of years and was a well known and I think respected source of actual factual knowledge of how things like these sway systems work in the real world. With all that I think I have given anyone reading this thread a sufficiently based and referenced good source of information to support the position I have expressed here that the DC Cam system "NEITHER FORCES OR PUSHES" anything ... just like the Equal-i-zer system, it simply "resists" by friction sway movement of a trailer when towed. Larry Your attempt at a passive agressive insult aside, I do understand what Ron wrote back then (I remember it). Ron had his own motivation behind his statements. His post was obtuse and took a long and eloborate path to avoid the true mechanics of what is going on with the DC system. Ron had a bit of an ego and seemed to feel he had to post on things even though he didn't really have an answer. The force of the DC system is no more absolute than the friction systems are. A friction bar resists movement but is not strong enough to cause the truck to drag a trailer sideways after a sharp turn - the bar slips to allow that movement. The friction material itself has a break-over point at which it yields. The DC also has a BO point. As the truck and trailer get out of line, the pocket of the spring bar is forced against the cam (which cannot move in relation to the trailer) and the steep slope of the pocket is forced against the cam. This is the point of greatest force and the trailer is now pushing against this sharp angle in the spring bars. It takes MORE force to climb this steep portion of the spring bar than it would to slide along the straight section of it. For the combination to continue to get more out of line, the bar has to be bent upward. That amount of force is relative. It isn't so great that it cannot be overcome but is is suffcient to provide a "bump" that the trailer has to act against. This is the "active" part because it doesnjust slow down movement, it's pushing back against it. The two parts push against each other with cancelling force until the cam overcomes the pocket and slides along the bar. Sway control is all but lost after this breakover is achieved. Just like the friction device, this relative force is enough to influence the attitude of the combo but not enough to send things sliding. To adress other comments, the leverage at the tongue is not nearly what it is at the back of the trailer - this is true. It doesn't need to be. Would you suggest that a friction bar has no effect because of its location? No, I'm sure you wouldn't. So we know the attitude of the trailer can be influenced in that location. Notice I made that entire post without insulting anyone else posting in this thread? You just described exactly why the DC is a FRICTION hitch. The rest is just opinons... Is the DC better because it has increased friction when moving away from center than towards center? or is the Equalizer better because it can generate more force equally in BOTH directions? Keep in mind that SWAY is a back and forth motion of the TT. In reality, they both perform well. The advantage of the so called centering action of the DC is cancelled out if one believes that sway is when the TT wags back and forth... Since the DC has less force in this direction, it is at a disadvantage at that stage of sway. The EQUALIZER with its 4 points of friction can generate more antisway force in both directions. Bottom line... They both perform well. I don't see any friction and the instructions actually tell you lube those points when the hitch is set up tightly. They're actually a little comical. They say "never lubricate..." then go on to say "lubricate if... and finally, 'always lubricate..." Both sides of the DC do work to control sway at the same time. They're just climbing up oposite ends of the bars saddles/pockets from each other. Notice I never said friction systems dont work - they do but my experince is that the DC works better. I had a friction system for a long time. It worked OK but would tend to wear and get noisy (esp when wet). Seems like it would get contaminated with road scum, etc. To us, the DC is easier and faster to set up than installing the extra friction bar.
ScottG 04/11/20 10:44am Travel Trailers
RE: Help Identifying things in my RV

Seems like a lot of wires for a B/U alarm!
ScottG 04/11/20 10:01am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Weight Distribution with sway control question

Well Larry, as a retired engineer I do understand how such things work and I can explain how lateral force is generated but I don't think you're open to a civil discussion about it. So, there's no reason for me to attempt to do so. We'll just have to agree to disagree. One thing is for certain, there is absolutely no friction material employed in the DC. Good luck to you. Again IMO you clearly have demonstrated a true lack of understanding of these systems since the Equal-i-zer just like the DC Cam also has no friction material either. Both using the metal to metal friction with the DC Cam only using "sliding friction" whereas the Equal-i-zer uses both "rotational" friction from the sockets along with "sliding" friction from the bars in the "L" brackets. Also anytime I see someone trying to use some vague education or experience credentials like your "retired engineer" reference often tells me one has no valid or verifiable position on a subject. While I could try and support my input on the subject being discussed here by saying I have and "actual" masters degree in engineering, but my degree is in "systems engineering" which has no real direct application to the topic of this thread so I don't go there. Thus, I quoted a real mechanical engineer that as Hunting has metioned has posted extensively on various mechanical based subject over a number of years and was a well known and I think respected source of actual factual knowledge of how things like these sway systems work in the real world. With all that I think I have given anyone reading this thread a sufficiently based and referenced good source of information to support the position I have expressed here that the DC Cam system "NEITHER FORCES OR PUSHES" anything ... just like the Equal-i-zer system, it simply "resists" by friction sway movement of a trailer when towed. Larry Your attempt at a passive agressive insult aside, I do understand what Ron wrote back then (I remember it). Ron had his own motivation behind his statements. His post was obtuse and took a long and eloborate path to avoid the true mechanics of what is going on with the DC system. Ron had a bit of an ego and seemed to feel he had to post on things even though he didn't really have an answer. The force of the DC system is no more absolute than the friction systems are. A friction bar resists movement but is not strong enough to cause the truck to drag a trailer sideways after a sharp turn - the bar slips to allow that movement. The friction material itself has a break-over point at which it yields. The DC also has a BO point. As the truck and trailer get out of line, the pocket of the spring bar is forced against the cam (which cannot move in relation to the trailer) and the steep slope of the pocket is forced against the cam. This is the point of greatest force and the trailer is now pushing against this sharp angle in the spring bars. It takes MORE force to climb this steep portion of the spring bar than it would to slide along the straight section of it. For the combination to continue to get more out of line, the bar has to be bent upward. That amount of force is relative. It isn't so great that it cannot be overcome but is is suffcient to provide a "bump" that the trailer has to act against. This is the "active" part because it doesnjust slow down movement, it's pushing back against it. The two parts push against each other with cancelling force until the cam overcomes the pocket and slides along the bar. Sway control is all but lost after this breakover is achieved. Just like the friction device, this relative force is enough to influence the attitude of the combo but not enough to send things sliding. To adress other comments, the leverage at the tongue is not nearly what it is at the back of the trailer - this is true. It doesn't need to be. Would you suggest that a friction bar has no effect because of its location? No, I'm sure you wouldn't. So we know the attitude of the trailer can be influenced in that location. Notice I made that entire post without insulting anyone else posting in this thread?
ScottG 04/11/20 09:11am Travel Trailers
RE: Uninsured & Underinsured Motorist Bodily Insurance

Not mandatory but desirable for the personal injury side. OTOH, if you rig gets damaged your collision is going to fix it even if the other guy isn't covered. Then if he has anything, they'll go after him. You'd be on your own for any personal injury though.
ScottG 04/10/20 09:50pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Weight Distribution with sway control question

Below is a post from Ron Gratz made HERE several years ago explaining specifically how both the Equal-i-zer and DC cam systems work: The Dual Cam is a friction based anti-sway system. I discussed how it differs from the Equal-i-zer in my previous post. I do not know the magnitudes of anti-sway torques which can be generated by these two systems; but, I'm working on that. A difference between Equal-i-zer and Dual Cam which I did not address is how the sway control affects the ability of the TV and TT to realign once they have developed a relative yaw angle. The Equal-i-zer will produce the same resisting torque whether the TT is trying to move away from the "centered" position or moving away from it. The DC, by virtue of the sloping surfaces on the ends of its WD bars will provide more resistance to moving away from center than to moving toward center. Some see this as an advantage in helping to get the vehicles realigned after a lane change, rounding a curve, etc. The Equal-i-zer differs from a friction-bar anti-sway system in two important ways: 1) It can generate anti-sway torque directly via the trunnions and seats, and 2) It can generate much more torque. A friction bar simply produces a tension or compression in the bar which, in turn, pushes or pulls on the ball to which the end of the bar is attached. This generates a torque on the hitch which helps to control sway. The most commonly used friction bar has an adjustment which determines how much tension/compression it can produce. The magnitude of this is factory-set at 1100#. The center-center distance between the friction-bar ball and the main ball is 5.5". Therefore, at the factory setting, this friction bar can generate about 500 ft-lbs of torque. If you installed one of these bars on each side of the A-frame, the pair could generate about 1000 ft-lbs. One difference between the friction-bar control and the DC and Equal-i-zer is that the friction force on the friction bar can easily be "turned off". Some people believe this is an advantage when towing in reduced-traction conditions. Ron You can readily see that there is NO PUSH OR FORCE in how the DC Cam system works. The cams with their slope only change the amount of "FRICTION RESISTANCE" depending on how far off the trailer is from centerline. Larry Well Larry, as a retired engineer I do understand how such things work and I can explain how lateral force is generated but I don't think you're open to a civil discussion about it. So, there's no reason for me to attempt to do so. We'll just have to agree to disagree. One thing is for certain, there is absolutely no friction material employed in the DC. Good luck to you.
ScottG 04/10/20 08:35pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's happening with your summer gig?

We have reservations for every other weekend during the summer, starting with Memorial day. At this point, our state parks are closed until May 4. I'm cautiously optimistic they'll be open for the Holiday.
ScottG 04/10/20 08:27pm Workamping Forum
RE: The perfect RV campground

I once met a gentleman (worked on his private jet) who flew around the world with he and his buddys family for 5 years researching what made a great Ski resort. Then they built one. If you have time, try to travel to some of the highest rated resorts and see what makes them tick. The one that comes to mind near me is Seven Feathers ("comfort stations" are a BIG plus for us). This place has campers crammed close together but it's still a fabulous place. Also, and I am assuming you're NOT this way but there are some folks that absolutely hate customers in general. They show nothing but contempt for them and side with who ever is against them at every turn. If you feel that way, don't go into this business. I truly wish you the best of luck and hope we can stay at your resort some day. Cheers, Scott
ScottG 04/10/20 05:14pm Family Camping
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