Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Search
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'pnichols' found 47 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 3  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Can I charge the house battery with the engine alternator?

Just added 2 digital volt meters to my dash. I can now see the house battery and car battery voltage levels with the engine off. When driving I can determine if I need to charge the house and monitor the alternator. Life is good I have installed the same two digital voltage meters showing the same two voltages on the dash of our 2005 Itasca Class C E450 motorhome - all the time whether we're stopped with the engine running or not ... or traveling. I also have a 3rd digital current flow meter on the dash that shows current into (positive numerical reading) and current out-of (negative numerical reading) the coach battery bank - all the time whether we're stopped with the engine running or not ... or traveling. Our motorhome came stock from Winnebago wired to automatically (via a solenoid activated whenever the engine start key is turned on) connect the engine starting battery to the coach battery bank. The two voltmeters on the dash read just about the same whenever the engine is running (if the solenoid has been activated and if it's contacts aren't too corroded). The preceding of course is assuming that the built-in generator isn't running or we're not parked on hookups. Whenever the engine is running, the current flow meter on the dash shows how much current (positive numerical readings) the coach batteries are receiving from the engine's 130 amp alternator. When the engine is not running, the current flow meter on the dash shows how much current (negative nummerical readings) is being pulled from the coach battery bank to power the coach's 12 volt circuits. The preceding situations of course assume that the built-in generator isn't running or we're not parked on hookups. By the way whenever we stop to gas up the E450's fuel tank, for safety I turn off the coach's 12V system switch so that the refrigerator's gas flame can't come on ... as the refrigerator's outside ventilation port is close to where I refuel the motorhome. Also after gassing up if I forget to turn back on the coach's 12V system switch (thus the refrigerator can't operate), the two voltmeter's on the dash don't read close to the same ... which immediately tells me to stop somwhere soon and go back into the coach and turn on the coach's 12V system switch so that the refrigerator can operate while we travel!
pnichols 11/25/22 08:32pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Escaping summer heat while in the southwest?

Discussions on "how to camp and be comfortable in the high heat seasons" always leave me scratching my head. i.e.: Considering what RVs cost, probably no one would buy one without built-in A/C and usually a built-in generator to run it ... yet the bulk of owners try to avoid high temperature camping at all costs ... especially without hookups. And in addition, some (of us) campers don't function well at high altitudes. Many of our best trips have been across the U.S. during the summer months, including the Southern U.S. at non-high altitudes. Part of what made them good trips was the lack of crowds in or near our camping spots -> I assume due primarily due to the high outside temperatures. Since our RV is adequately self-contained with it's quiet-enough generator and an interior that can be curtained off in sections to maximize A/C cooling (and heating) efficiencies, we don't have to within reason let high-altitudes, cool seasons, or warm seasons dictate our camping.
pnichols 11/02/22 01:48pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Tires E-350/450: Stock 225/75? Tall 215/85? Wide 235/85?

What I would REALLY PREFER on my 11,800 lb. (~fully loaded) 24 ft. Class C are Mud/Snow tires that are so over-spec'd for my MH such that if I blow a rear tire in the dually set - I can drive aways without changing it in situations where it blows and it is inconvenient or unsafe to stop and change it!! i.e. I had an outside dually Michelin M/S LT LRE blow once years ago on a hard surface 4-lane road with light traffic. I was only a few miles from a small town, so I slowed down to ~10 MPH and drove all the way into the town and had a gas station attendant change it. Of course the other Michelin tire within the dually set was drastically overloaded while I traveled on it. That tire went on as if it had never been overloaded and provided several more years of service. In other words - another parameter to shoot for in choosing tires for the rear of a rear-dually Class C is ... "can 3 tires in the rear (when one is flat) safely carry you along for aways at low speed until it can be changed?" This is what I call having a "redundancy" tire arrangement in the rear of a dually chassis - and it takes very rugged tires back there that have a generous-as-possible weight carrying margin over what they normally carry day-in and day-out. P.S. I keep 80 lbs. of pressure in the rear tires all the time. I've compensated for the resulting stiff ride in the rear by installing variable rate shocks in the rear that function as "no shocks" on highway cracks and as "heavy duty" shocks on roadway curves and in side-winds.
pnichols 10/31/22 01:36pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Tires E-350/450: Stock 225/75? Tall 215/85? Wide 235/85?

The Ford E-350 DRW and E-450 DRW E-Series Cutaway Chassis OEM 16" x 6" wheels that were manufactured in Canada by Accuride, identified by eight circular hand holes, are rated to 80 psi. I haven't personally verified the wheel psi rating of the current 4 hand hole 16"x6" OEM wheels made by Maxion in Mexico, but have every indication to believe that they match the original wheel specification of 80 psi Max cold inflation pressure. I have personally verified the OEM wheels made by Accuride in Canada. The interesting, informational, and arguably irrelevant aspect of the higher rating of the European Tyre & Rim Technical Organisation commercial tire standard developed for Euro Vans such as the Sprinter, Transit, Fiat, ProMaster, and VW equivalents marketed under various names depending on country... tires which we in the United States can identify as "C-Metric" tires (as very distinct from "LT-Metric Load Range C" tires... is that the "500 lbs." higher rating per tire in the 225/75R16C size is at 83 psi. The stock wheels are only rated to 80 psi. So the "margin" of weight capacity per tire must be reduced by the C-Metric tires rated capacity at a reduced pressure, which in this case is no higher than 80 psi. Nexen doesn't offer any Load Inflation Tables. I even called Nexen tech support for this information, and spent 30 minutes on the phone with an Andrew at Nexen, who was not able to locate a Load Inflation Table for any of the five offerings that Nexen produces in the LT225/75R16 or 225/75R16C sizes. However, most other tire manufacturers do provide load inflation tables, which let the tire user know the weight capacity of a given tire when inflated to less than the maximum psi that the tire is capable of withstanding. Due to tire industry standards organizations, there is generally consistency from brand to brand in load inflation indices for any given specific tire size. In this case, to determine how much additional weight carrying "margin" a 225/75R16C C-Metric tire has over an LT225/75R16E LT-Metric tire when both types of tires are inflated to the maximum pressure that the OEM steel wheel is rated for when cold (80 psi), I reviewed the Load Inflation Tables of several different brands of C-Metric tires in this size, and all tables from every brand checked were consistent with each other. When inflated to 80 psi, a 225/75R16C tire is rated to support 3,085 lbs in single wheel configuration, as opposed to 3,195 lbs when inflated to 83 psi. In dual rear wheel configuration, the C-Metric 225/75R16C is rated to support 2,975 lbs at 80 psi, as opposed to 3,085 lbs when inflated to 83 psi. By contrast, the LT225/75R16E tire, when inflated to 80 psi, is rated at 2,680 single, 2,470 dual (per each individual tire). So to stack the weight carrying capacity differences up neatly in a row: 3,195 lbs Single / 3,085 lbs Dual - C-Metric at 83 psi 3,085 lbs Single / 2,975 lbs Dual - C-Metric at 80 psi (OEM wheel psi rating) 2,680 lbs Single / 2,470 lbs Dual - LT-Metric at 80 psi On the steer axle, there is a 405 lbs difference between C-Metric and LT-Metric at 80 psi, and on the drive axle, the difference grows to 505 lbs. at 80 psi. Where the point in REDUCING the mental margin afforded to the C-Metric tire by ignoring the tire's maximum weight capacity at any pressure beyond the pressure rating of the wheel is arguably irrelevant, as all of these ratings exceed the weight capacity of the rear axles of all Ford E-350/450 cutaways, which range from 7,800 lbs to 9,600 lbs, depending on model and year. However, it seemed to be an interesting observation to make... keeping the pressure limits of the wheel in mind. That's good data above in your post. However it raises one important question rarely discussed in any of the forums: Does "2,680 lbs Single / 2,470 lbs Dual - LT-Metric at 80 psi" AS COMPARED TO "3,085 lbs Single / 2,975 lbs Dual - C-Metric at 80 psi" mean -> for a given tire size between the two tire types that the C-Metric version is a more rugged/stronger tire? i.e. That the C-Metric version has more plies? If so, if carrying capacity is not an issue ... should one use the C-Metric type tires if they wish for more puncture-proofness - as in occasional offroad travel with their Class C?
pnichols 10/30/22 12:25am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Tires E-350/450: Stock 225/75? Tall 215/85? Wide 235/85?

Thanks PNichols. If you have an E-450, then you must have 4.56 gearing? What transmission does your rig have? How many speeds? Did you notice any difference in shift points on grades with the taller tires? I "think" that our E450 has a 4.56 rear differential, but am not absolutely sure as some E450's may have been available with a 4.30 rear differential. I tried researching this using the codes on the door sticker but was never able to determine the rear differential gearing for sure. Our 2005 Itasca Class C's E450 chassis has the 5-speed 5R110W transmission. As I understand it, this transmission actually has 6 distinct internal gear ratios, with the computer invoking one of the two internal ratios for one of the transmission's gears - depending upon (outside air ambient?) temperature. I have not noticed any difference in shift points with the taller tires, but any effect purely due to tire size may be masked because I mainly travel in Tow/Haul mode. The speedometer reads a bit on the "too-slow" side with the taller tires, but this is of no concern to us (a dealer could maybe tweak this). We cruise with a speedometer reading in the 58-60 MPH range, with the tach reading around 2200 RPM ... and hopefully our mileage being in the 9-10 MPG range (but I don't keep records on this). Of course the larger diameter tires somewhat compensate for the high 4.56 rear differential by moving the overall drive train's ratio lower. However we do prefer the E450's overall drive train's ratio - even with our taller tires - being higher than that of a stock E350's because we prefer the improved low speed pulling power during occasional offroad travel.
pnichols 10/24/22 11:09am Class C Motorhomes
RE: System check up panel. What do these mean?

For what it's worth: We always leave home in our Class C with every tank full that should be full and every tank empty that should be empty. When out and about on a trip we do the same whenever heading out to any boondock camping site on the Far Side of Beyond. We don't have to "believe our tank lights" for the black water or fresh water tanks. For the black water tank we can look down the toilet with a flashlight to confirm how full it is, and for the fresh water tank we can lift the bed mattress and look down through an inspection hole to view the see-through freshwater tank. For the grey water, propane, and chassis fuel tanks we have to believe their gauges!
pnichols 10/23/22 10:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Tires E-350/450: Stock 225/75? Tall 215/85? Wide 235/85?

Tire Choices for Ford E-Series Cutaway Class C Motorhomes What replacement tires did you put on your Class C motorhome built on a Ford E-350 or E-450 (aka E-Superduty in older rigs) cutaway chassis, and what were your reasons for your tire selection? Did you stick with the stock tire size of LT225/75r16 ? Did you go taller and skinnier, changing to LT215/85r16 ? Did you go taller and wider, changing to LT235/85r16? Did you upgrade to 10 ply rating Load Range "E"? (If you have an older E-350 originally specified with 8 ply rated Load Range "D") Did you switch to European style 225/75r16C, such as what is specified for Euro van cutaways like the Transit and Sprinter? Have you had an experience with any particular brand and model of tire for your E-350/450 RV that caused you to swear "never again"? Do you have a particular brand and model of tire that is your trusted "go to"? Thank you! We have a smaller (24 ft.) Class C for just the DW & myself. We wanted a Class C which provided all the comforts of home for two in varied weather conditions, while at the same time providing enough travel/camping flexibility and chassis ruggedness so as to almost match what a 2WD TC could provide. We do take our Class C carefully offroad at times. As such, we searched for and bought it new built on the optional-for-it's-weight heavier duty E450 chassis instead of the common E350 chassis usually used for small Class C rigs. At the first tire change opportunity we did not go for the stock LT225/75R16 Load Range E tires that came on it. We instead chose LT215/85R16 size Load Range E tires. These tires are rated for the same weight carrying capacity - but are taller for more offroad ground clearance. Plus as a bonus they are slightly narrower so as to both provide more space between the dually sidewalls for improved sidewall air cooling when on the highway during high ambient air temperatures and ... they "punch through to the underneath hard road surface" better under slush and snow conditions due to their higher pounds-per-square-inch downwards tread pressure. As for "guaranteed quality", our Class C came with Michelin LT tires, so we bit the expense bullet and replaced them with Michelin LT215/85R16 tires.
pnichols 10/23/22 07:10pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: outside speakers

I guess that our 2005 E450 chassis based Itasca Class C is "old school": The outside speakers only play sound from the outside radio and outside CD player. Any TV we use inside must have it's own built-in speakers or we must connect it to the coach's inside surround speaker system normally fed by the dash radio or dash CD player.
pnichols 10/14/22 12:15am Class C Motorhomes
RE: We've come full circle back to a "C"

In 2004 we bought a Class C and had SOOO much fun and many adventures for 10 years with it; then we tried a 5er, a couple of pop-up truck campers, and a small TT. Yesterday we discovered the Mother Lode of small C's, and bought a 2023 Thor Chateau 22E with the Ford E-350 chassis. Ed has had some health issues, and we figure a "C" will be a lot easier on him than slithering into the bed in a pop-up camper or using a Luggable Loo as the bathroom....LOL! (I will be doing the driving and setup - all he has to do is be my favorite passenger) We just weren't ready to give up traveling and camping! Happy travels, everyone! Deb I agree 100% on your coments about your "Mother Lode" small Class C!! We bought our 24 ft. E450 non-slide Class C new in 2006 and have been across the U.S. twice in it, as well as traveled extensively in the Western U.S. with it. We can camp in a variety of places with it in complete comfort: Boondock dry camping, non-boondock dry camping, commercial campground full hookup camping, city parking lot dry camping, etc.. It's rear corner bed is even so comfortable that the DW (she has a bad back) often sleeps in it while it's parked between trips in our backyard! Our two most challenging places to visit with it were a remote place in the Texas Panhandle during the summer, and off a remote 4X4 road in Death Valley. We find it an excellent compromise among the Class A/B/B+/C, TC, TT and 5'er RV choices. We do not tow, as we can usually park close enough to visit most areas of interest to us. We like our little home close to us everywhere when traveling for maximum comfort, convenience, flexibility and minimum hassle.
pnichols 10/05/22 12:04pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: "Godzilla" Ford V 8

I guess the idea was for the rv engine to get better mpg's.....??? bc it's operating at lower rpms where its tuned to get peak HP and torque at a lower rpm , where the fuel injection settings are tuned at peak. Super Duty chassis with the 7.3 engine is tuned to produce 430 hp at 5,500 rpm. The Premium RV 7.3 is tuned to produce 350 hp at 3,750 rpm. I think its better suited for the rv which is always hauling its weight where a P/u is not. To have power early on , lower rpm's, is a benefit in an rv. Hmmm ... other than in drag, or closed course, racing ... what pickup driver (or RV driver) revs their 7.3 V8 to 5,500 rpm? I'm guessing that the "RV tuned version" of the 7.3 V8 would probably be putting out close to 430 hp too ... at 5,500 rpm.
pnichols 08/19/22 11:02am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Lazy Daze is closed permanently

I really liked the Lazy Daze all-aluminum coach shell and their good old earth-tone interiors. I'm REALLY not into the white/grey/black/chrome/stainless-steel hospital operating room look for RV interiors!
pnichols 07/20/22 02:55pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Lazy Daze is closed permanently

Not sure why a V8 is a good idea, prefer V10, need enough power when needed. Because the Ford gas 7.3 V8 puts out much higher HP and Torque numbers than any version of the Ford V10 ever did. Hmmm .... please compare the V10 HP & Torque as previously used in Ford pickups (the 3-valve version - not the 2-valve version as previously used in the E-Series vans) to their current new V8. I don't think the new V8 swamps out the good old 3-valve V10 by "that, that" much in the power department. :h (Wasn't Ford's reason for the new V8 -> to improve MPG as much as possible for it's given power ... as compared to the 3-valve V10's MPG for nearly the same power?) Why wouldn't you want more power, or even the same, on less fuel? At least the 7.3 isn't known for burning oil, puking plugs, and having exhaust manifolds leak, at least not yet. The reason for my post was: Why spend new dollars for an RV with the new V8 mainly because one thinks it "has (much) more power" ... instead of staying with a V10 you already have in an RV you already own? The reason for my post was to point out that the new 7.3 is a stronger and more efficient engine than any V10 Ford ever made. I never suggested anyone sell a V10 class C just to get the 7.3. That's an assumption on your part. Hang on to your obsolete technology which is easier than getting the V10 to hold onto its spark plugs, exhaust manifolds, and oil. FWIW, my 2005 V10 doesn't blow spark plugs and uses no oil. Also, try getting the new V8 repaired in such boondock places as near Plush, Oregon!! I've already read in the RV forums of issues with the new V8. (However, my V10 did indeed need some exhaust manifold bolts replaced years ago on low priority after owning it many years. I had it done locally during routine maintenance.)
pnichols 07/16/22 10:04am Class C Motorhomes
RE: In need of opinions, thank you

We have a 24ft. Forest River Forester Class C- LE-model 2251LE-with a Chevy 450 chassis and a 6.0 Chevy gas engine. Wanted to get the Chevy because we had read stories about the smaller footwell-passenger side- in the Fords. Also, a number of complaints of engine/exhaust heat coming up through the floorboard of the Ford chassis-mainly on the passenger side. Previously we had a 29 5T Arctic Fox 5th wheel-about 30ft.-towed by an F250 diesel. Love the C- my wife can/will drive it now. Easy to get around in-easy to park-it's totally self-contained-don't need a Toad-we just take the C wherever we need or want to go. Generally, we get 9-11 mpg I pretty much agree with what you say above, except in our case it's a 24ft. Itasca Class C built on a Ford E450 V10 chassis. BTW, floor heat is no issue at all when we turn the cab A/C on with it's air coming from under the dash directed down at the floor. No toad necessary ... we take our little home with us everywhere - on road and off road - with hookups and without hookups.
pnichols 07/15/22 03:03pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Selling our C -- Two Options

Off topic a bit, but FWIW ... from a college expense vs. having/keeping an RV viewpoint ... I guess we were lucky: Our daughter graduated from a local state college and lived at our home while doing it, so her college costs were near zero. Our son gave up on a local low cost junior college early-on and still managed to retire at about age 45. As a result our two kids now love to camp because they grew up doing it with us in a couple of our past RVs!
pnichols 07/15/22 02:49pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Lazy Daze is closed permanently

Not sure why a V8 is a good idea, prefer V10, need enough power when needed. Because the Ford gas 7.3 V8 puts out much higher HP and Torque numbers than any version of the Ford V10 ever did. Hmmm .... please compare the V10 HP & Torque as previously used in Ford pickups (the 3-valve version - not the 2-valve version as previously used in the E-Series vans) to their current new V8. I don't think the new V8 swamps out the good old 3-valve V10 by "that, that" much in the power department. :h (Wasn't Ford's reason for the new V8 -> to improve MPG as much as possible for it's given power ... as compared to the 3-valve V10's MPG for nearly the same power?) Why wouldn't you want more power, or even the same, on less fuel? At least the 7.3 isn't known for burning oil, puking plugs, and having exhaust manifolds leak, at least not yet. The reason for my post was: Why spend new dollars for an RV with the new V8 mainly because one thinks it "has (much) more power" ... instead of staying with a V10 you already have in an RV you already own?
pnichols 07/15/22 01:30pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Lazy Daze is closed permanently

Not sure why a V8 is a good idea, prefer V10, need enough power when needed. Because the Ford gas 7.3 V8 puts out much higher HP and Torque numbers than any version of the Ford V10 ever did. Hmmm .... please compare the V10 HP & Torque as previously used in Ford pickups (the 3-valve version - not the 2-valve version as previously used in the E-Series vans) to their current new V8. I don't think the new V8 swamps out the good old 3-valve V10 by "that, that" much in the power department. :h (Wasn't Ford's reason for the new V8 -> to improve MPG as much as possible for it's given power ... as compared to the 3-valve V10's MPG for nearly the same power?)
pnichols 07/15/22 12:00am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Lazy Daze is closed permanently

With the demise of Lazy Daze, it appears that it's going to be very difficult to find new, short length, Class C (with a cab-over bed) motorhomes based on a Ford E450 cutaway chassis with the new V8. I guess I better keep owning, maintaining, and enjoying our non-slide overkill chassis E450-V10-based Itasca 24V Class C! (I refuse to surrender all the offroad fun to the truck rooftop/SUV rooftop/expedition trailer crowd!)
pnichols 07/11/22 12:31pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Replacement catalytic converter

This appears to be a discussion concerning Class C motorhomes with gas engines that hence have catalytic converters that are getting stolen. Are cat thieves picking on Class C motorhomes for some reason? Why aren't the millions of gas powered pickup trucks getting their converters stolen? If it's happening with PU's too, I sure don't seem to be reading much about it. :h
pnichols 07/04/22 07:27pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best mileage ever on a great albeit short trip...

I now often just recharge the coach batteries by idling it periodically when camping. Phil, did you install a DC to DC charger ? No .... with the V10 idling the V10's alternator charges both the chassis battery and coach batteries. I think (not sure, though) that the Winnebago design inter-connects both our coach battery bank (2 Grp 31 115 AH each deep cycle AGMs) and the chassis liquid acid battery in a direct parallel arrangement with each other. I have installed on the driver's side dash three digital meters - one to show chassis battery voltage, one to show coach battery bank voltage, and one to show how much current is either going into the coach battery bank (positive ampere reading) or leaving the coach battery bank (negative ampere reading). With the coach battery bank about 50% depleted, when I start up the V10 and idle it I've seen as much as 70 amps from the stock Ford 130 amp engine alternator going into the twin Group 31's in the coach battery bank. This current reading of course tapers off over time and I usually turn off the idling V10 when the current flowing into the coach batteries reads around 10-15 amps. Rarely do I need to do this idle-charging longer than about one hour. It's super quiet ... and of course I can heat or air condition our entire coach interior at the same time while I'm doing this coach battery charging via use of the excellent high capacity Ford Econoline heating and A/C systems. So since we're not full-timers, I've never installed solar and have instead used either 1) the idling V10, or 2) the built-in Onan generator, or 3) our 650 watt Honda portable genny ... to deal with all of our coach battery charging when camping. We never have any fumes inside the coach when using these methods because we can pressurize the interior to keep any fumes from entering. I read somewhere that the V10 consumes about 7/10 of a gallon of gas per hour when idling, so it probably will take many years before I rack up enough idling fuel costs to equal the cost of a decent solar system. I can use my charging methods rain, shine, or shade and I can use the idling V10 method for the ultimate in quietness if other campers are nearby. Also, I can pretty much use the idling method "outside generator hours" in certain situations due to it's quietness.
pnichols 06/23/22 10:50pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best mileage ever on a great albeit short trip...

D.C. What a nice little getaway you two had!! We just spent a similar week at around 5700 ft. under the pines at a similar beautiful lake in the CA Sierra Foothills - Lake Davis - in our 24 ft. Class C. We were with a group of friends in their RVs and our adult kids in their tents. I hate to see the V10 fade away into the sunset! What a great engine. Ours idles so quiet and vibration-free that I now often just recharge the coach batteries by idling it periodically when camping.
pnichols 06/23/22 06:12pm Class C Motorhomes
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 3  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.