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 > Your search for posts made by 'rltorpey' found 22 matches.

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RE: And Texas Caves In

" I know we are loosing a lot Drs and nurses." Well simply LOOK at the Dr's improper wearing of the mask!!! He has not pushed the metal strips tight to the sides of his nose as REQUIRED to reduce unfiltered contaminated air coming in around the edges of the mask. I see it all the time these "PROFESSIONALS" on TV with mask on forehead, on chin, covering only mouth and as shown in pic. YA wonder why these people have gotten sick????????? https://i.imgur.com/tt1EVdal.jpg Maybe instead of watching them on TV you should haul your butt on down to the ER and volunteer to spend 40+ hours each week helping them care for Covid-19 patients. I'll be looking forward to reading your critiques next week.
rltorpey 04/15/20 11:52am General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Let me define what I consider a vaccine.....Seriously? :B
rltorpey 04/14/20 01:57pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Those low testing numbers you refer to translate into almost 3 million tests which is more than any other nation in the world and more than the next two nations combined. You won't find any cases if you don't test for them. Covid 19 Statistics The numbers of tests done in USA is about 1/2 of the number done in Germany. Many other countries are doing more per capita than USA. Total tests reported as of today: US 2,938,148 Germany 1,317,887 Per capita, Germany and many other countries have tested more people but the US has still tested roughly 1.6 million more people than the country with the second most tests, Germany. If you test an additional 1.6 million people you're probably going to find a couple more cases of Covid-19. If you want to talk total cases per capita, the US and Germany aren't too far apart right now with the US listed at 1773 cases per million and Germany listed at 1552 cases per million. The biggest problem is that most of this data from all of the countries involved is highly suspect. It's impossible to draw any meaningful conclusions from incomplete and highly suspect data.
rltorpey 04/13/20 06:59pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Those low testing numbers you refer to translate into almost 3 million tests which is more than any other nation in the world and more than the next two nations combined. You won't find any cases if you don't test for them. Covid 19 Statistics
rltorpey 04/13/20 03:14pm General RVing Issues
RE: CDC and the government may be loosening the lockdown

A lot of people buy lottery tickets with a lot worse odds. I would much rather get a flu shot than deal with having the flu, even if there is still a chance that I might get the flu anyway. The thing that seals the deal for me is the fact that if I get a flu shot and end up getting the flu anyway it probably won't be as severe as it would have been if I hadn't gotten the flu shot. That translates into less time being sick, less risk of being hospitalized or worse. Plus I get to pat myself on the back for helping to improve herd immunity. Flu vaccination has been shown in several studies to reduce severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick. A 2017 study showed that flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized flu patients. A 2018 study showed that among adults hospitalized with flu, vaccinated patients were 59 percent less likely to be admitted to the ICU than those who had not been vaccinated. Among adults in the ICU with flu, vaccinated patients on average spent 4 fewer days in the hospital than those who were not vaccinated. CDC Vaccine Effectiveness
rltorpey 04/13/20 10:54am General RVing Issues
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

Previous post. CPAP machines have two filters One is foam to filter gross particulates An inner one white in color is HEPA 2 grade which will block 100%;virus. Following post. I stated that a CPAP filters incoming air for the CPAP patient. Really? It must have been on a different thread. I'm not sure why you brought up CPAP. I haven't seen anyone walking around wearing a CPAP rig. But if you're going to discuss CPAP you should clarify that it's only the input that's filtered in a home CPAP rig and this makes them very dangerous to be around if the person receiving CPAP has COVID 19, which is often the situation for first responders and hospital workers. It could also be dangerous if you're living with someone who has sleep apnea and is quarantined at home with COVID 19 so I think it's an important point to make. If you're using a CPAP rig with HEPA filtering on the input to protect yourself against contracting COVID 19 it should be pretty effective but there are more portable solutions available. Kind of hard to use CPAP while you're traveling around. "If I have symptoms of the coronavirus, will using CPAP spread the virus to others? Current evidence suggests that the virus that causes COVID-19 spreads between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). It is transmitted through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. However, there is some concern that using CPAP could spread the virus through the exhalation port, which allows carbon dioxide to escape from your mask. This port also may release smaller virus-containing particles as an “aerosol,” which can remain suspended in the air for a few hours. It’s possible that your bedpartner could inhale these virus particles. Therefore, it is important to sleep alone by isolating yourself in a separate bedroom. You can continue to use CPAP while sleeping in this recovery room." American Academy of Sleep Medicine
rltorpey 04/12/20 08:11pm Around the Campfire
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

CPAP filters filter incoming air. If the machine has a HEPA filter it should protect the person wearing the CPAP mask from SARS-CoV2. HEPA filter vs SARS-CoV2 Problem with CPAP is that it is extremely dangerous for anyone in the area if the person wearing the CPAP mask has COVID 19 because the CPAP outlet is not filtered and the virus in the outlet air can be aerosolized, meaning that it can linger in the air for a long time. EMS personnel have been directed to avoid using CPAP with suspected COVID 19 patients. This is also the reason why hospitals generally have been skipping CPAP, BiPAP, and high flow O2 through Non-Rebreather Masks and going straight to vents. Vents protect healthcare workers by eliminating the possiblity of aerosolizing the virus. COVID 19 CPAP Use EMS COVID 19 Airway Management It is believed that an aerosolized SARS-CoV2 can remain in the air for hours and can travel far more than 6 feet but experts still believe the primary transmission method for COVID 19 is through droplets which don't travel more than about 6 feet. However, it is known that the virus can be aerosolized during certain medical procedures including administration of O2 through non-rebreathers, CPAP/BiPAP, administration of nebulized medications, and during intubation. This is what makes it so dangerous for first responders and other healthcare workers. Investigations continue into the likelihood of aerosolized SARS-CoV2 in non healthcare scenarios. SARS-CoV2 spread through droplets can be fairly easily controlled with proper measures. Aerosolized SARS-CoV2 is truly scary. My personal opinion is that the worst cases of COVID 19 are those that result from an exposure to aerosolized SARS-CoV2 and exposure to droplets probably results in less severe cases unless the patient has comorbidities. But that is just my opinion. Aerosolized SARS-CoV2
rltorpey 04/12/20 04:34pm Around the Campfire
RE: And Texas Caves In

As I understand it, the concern about high flow O2 delivery isn't because it's risky for the patient, it's because it's risky for the providers. When a patient is placed on a vent, the O2 delivery is part of a closed loop system so the patient's exhaled breaths aren't returned to the surrounding environment. Less aggressive forms of high flow O2 delivery are open loop systems, not only returning the patient's exhaled breaths to the surrounding environment but also potentially aerosolizing the virus, making it very dangerous for providers. According to this article, quickly placing Covid 19 patients who are deteriorating on vents has been SOP for providing high flow O2 in a manner that's safe for providers but they're re-thinking this since Covid 19 patients have been doing so poorly on vents. The article does also say in the last paragraph that it's possible the lungs are being damaged by higher pressure O2 delivery. I guess it proves that they still have a lot to learn.
rltorpey 04/11/20 05:51pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Monitor vital signs, manage fever and other symptoms, maintain airway, administer oxygen, manage co-morbidities, watch for progression. Administering supplemental O2 is probably the closest thing we have to an actual treatment for Covid 19, IMO. WHO
rltorpey 04/11/20 03:58pm General RVing Issues
RE: Gas prices

Try 68 cents per gallon. LinkIs that in the US? Sort of. It's on a Seneca Nation Indian reservation in western NY state but you don't have to be a tribal member to buy gas there.
rltorpey 04/10/20 09:12pm General RVing Issues
RE: Gas prices

The price would have to go even lower before I would use that pump!
rltorpey 04/10/20 09:10pm General RVing Issues
RE: Gas prices

Try 68 cents per gallon. Link
rltorpey 04/10/20 07:33pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Sometimes IMHO "young and in shape" may not be all that it seems. It may not mean those class of folks are "healthy" just because they're not overweight and move around a lot. I once read an article that has really stuck in my mind: The author stated that the best way to insure that one is healthy, and stays that way, is by the continual monitoring of one's blood chemistry and continually adjusting one's exercise and food so as to maintain their ideal chemistry profile between blood tests. I believe that the author had a complete blood workup every 6 months and would make lifestyle adjustments based on any factors changing too much, or any factors that were out of range. Maybe - in America at least - young is not always healthy and/or fit ... regardless of their seemingly good body weight index and amount of repetitive body movements. :h pnichols makes an excellent point here. My granddaughter is 18 years old and lives with me now since her college has gone totally online. I'm 61, yet I worry more about her contracting Covid 19 than I worry about myself. I run 10 miles a day, 3 times a week, and ran the NYC Marathon in November 2017. My granddaughter shops for jeans in the ultra skinny section but she is very sedentary and her diet is very unhealthy. Her immune system should be pretty strong because she's quite young but I'm sorry to say that she does little to help it. Regarding the impact this is having on our grandkids, it's already impacting mine. My granddaughter is finishing her first year of a 4 year Nursing program. She's not sure whether she'll be able to go back in the fall because she's lost her part time job that helps pay for her education and she isn't sure whether she'll be able to work this summer. Many of her friends from school are in the same situation. I teach for the college she's attending. It's a state school so she doesn't get any benefits due to me teaching there, but I just wanted to mention that a lot of my students are being impacted by this. Many of our students come from the NYC area. Our administration is afraid that next fall's enrollment is going to be significantly lower because of the financial impact this is having on our students. Enrollment is already down in my department from where we would expect it to be at this time. As an EMT, I'm all for saving lives but as an educator I'm very aware of the price the kids are paying. It's a very difficult balance to strike.
rltorpey 04/10/20 02:32pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

Wuhan China ends lockdown as Covid19 efectively controled https://youtu.be/H6dQVyz0syw Yes, but it took them 76 days, and they have complete control of their citizens. Not at all like in this country. We depend on voluntary compliance, which has actually worked quite well. The battle between micro-organism's and macro-organism's has been going on for eons. There has probably been millions of pandemics, that's exactly why we have an immune system. An event like this "culls the herd" and makes the rest stronger. It's natural selection at work. I know it's a stark description, but it's true. The virus adapts, then we adapt. Statistically, it is not 1%. It's been averaging 2.5% to 3.5% overall. Over the course of my career, I've probably intubated about 10,000 people. It's not the way you want to leave this world. To tolerate intubation, they not only sedate you but often paralyze you with medication. So your gagging but you can't move. It's horrible. Then you die from suffocation anyway if your an unlucky one. Once they get a vaccine, and we get herd immunity, it will be more like the flu. It does look like, for the most part, they have avoided a catastrotphe that could have gone to a million or more. The best defense against a Pandemic is to be basically healthy and to have a strong immune system. There are a lot of pathogens in the environment and you can't live in a bubble forever. SARS-CoV2, influenza, MRSA, rhinoviruses, noroviruses. Chances are good that you're going to be exposed and your best defense is to be healthy in the first place and to have a strong immune system that can fight off the disease. Stay fit by exercising regularly, eat a mostly healthy diet, try to get enough sleep, find a way to relieve stress other than eating (exercise helps), don't smoke. It's really pretty simple. We transport a lot of patients who are my age and younger who are in terrible health and it's often due to lifestyle choices. These people are high risk not just to Covid 19 but also to influenza, coronary artery disease, diabetes, stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Many of our patients now are so obese that we have to call the fire department for lift assist because 2 of us can't lift them into the ambulance. We could blame the healthcare system but at some point it comes down to each of us being responsible for our own health and not letting ourselves become a burden on the healthcare system and a burden on society. There will always be patients who struggle with diseases that are beyond their control. Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, many forms of cancer. Those people all have my deepest sympathy and I am honored to be able to assist them. But we have way too many people in this country who have serious health problems that are the result of poor lifestyle choices. I'm happy to assist them, too, but I wish they would start doing some of the things that they could do to help themselves.
rltorpey 04/10/20 08:31am General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

This conversation about the hospitals being overwhelmed is puzzling. I'm a volunteer Critical Care EMT in NY (state, not city). I live in a rural area. A while back somebody wrote that the hospitals are not overloaded by the flu. In my experience, that isn't true. We've cut our healthcare system to the bone. Our ERs are almost always busy. During flu season it gets really bad. It isn't unusual for us to leave patients in hall carts because all of the rooms are full. I've brought patients in by ambulance and had to wait for up to 30 minutes for a bed in the hall for them. I've been told it's even worse in the cities around here. And I'm talking about before Covid 19. It's not surprising to me to hear that hospitals are overwhelmed. From what I've seen the system has very little excess capacity. I suspect that's why so many politicians and medical experts have been so concerned. They know the system is already stretched pretty thin. The part that is puzzling, to me at least, is that the hospitals in this area are far from overwhelmed. In fact, they're kind of quiet. I don't think they have more than a couple of actual Covid 19 patients and I think social distancing has done a pretty good job of bringing flu season to an end this year. Our call volume has gone down. I think people may be afraid to call an ambulance to go to the hospital but the actual reason our call volume is down is probably because fewer people are working and fewer people are driving so we aren't getting industrial accidents or motor vehicle accidents and other normal day to day calls. Anyway, it's a strange situation, but I believe most people have more reason to fear influenza than Covid 19. Influenza seems to kill far more young, seemingly healthy people than Covid 19. I've seen some seriously ill children and young adults and it wasn't with Covid 19, it was with influenza. I wish you could have ridden in the back of the ambulance with me a while back with a 6 month old baby girl with a 105 degree temperature because of the flu. It gives you some perspective. I don't understand why so many people ignore influenza but seem to be scared to death of Covid 19. I keep reading that you can't compare influenza and Covid 19. Maybe not, but you can compare people's reactions to them, and given the lack of concern most people seem to have for influenza, the level of concern being shown for Covid 19 seems somewhat silly to me. People would think you were crazy if you suggested shutting down the economy every November and December to protect people at risk of dying from influenza. Think of the impact that would have on Christmas sales. Key Updates for Week 13, ending March 28, 2020 Laboratory confirmed flu activity as reported by clinical laboratories continues to decrease sharply and is now low. Influenza-like illness activity, while lower than last week, is still elevated. Influenza severity indicators remain moderate to low overall, but hospitalization rates differ by age group, with high rates among children and young adults. CDC Report
rltorpey 04/09/20 08:10pm General RVing Issues
RE: And Texas Caves In

The coronavirus must have passed its peak because round 2 has started. NY deferring workforce pay raises: 'We, frankly, don't have the money' "We, frankly, don't have the money," Robert Mujica, Cuomo's budget director, said at the governor's daily briefing, about 12 hours after some of the state's major unions began spreading the word about the pay freeze. He has estimated state revenue has taken at least a $10 billion dive since the virus hit New York. The freeze will last at least 90 days and would save New York $50 million. https://www.newsday.com/news/health/coronavirus/state-unions-pay-raise-1.43756563
rltorpey 04/09/20 04:24pm General RVing Issues
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

This is a good graphic showing Covid in relation to other ailments causing death. https://public.flourish.studio/visualisation/1712761/ The problem with this graphic is that it makes it look like the daily death rate is constant for everything but COVID 19. IT would tell a different story if an average daily death rate for COVID 19 was shown and compared to the rest. It will interesting to see what this looks like in 6 months, especially if the daily death rate for COVID 19 is reflected as an average daily rate at that time. Edited to add that NY state numbers, which are mostly NYC numbers, show large decreases in the numbers of new hospital admissions and new ICU admissions for the past couple of days, more hospital discharges tha hospital admissions for the third day in a row, and a moderate drop in daily deaths for the second day in a row. I feel the drop in the daily death rate is particularly significant since the number of deaths is a lagging indicator. Most of the people dying today were admitted to the hospital 7 to 14 days ago. The news still isn't good but this appears to be moving in a good direction. Several countries in Europe are also reporting that their numbers are starting to look better.
rltorpey 04/06/20 10:22am Around the Campfire
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

Sorry, influenza is a virus and spreads just like SARS-CoV2. It does not start simultaneously in cities all over. New variants start in one region and spread throughout the world in a few months just like SARS-CoV2 is doing. https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/forefront/biological-sciences-articles/where-does-the-flu-come-from-every-year
rltorpey 04/06/20 08:26am Around the Campfire
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

CDC estimates there were between 140 and 360 flu related deaths in the US each day for the past 6 months. Did anyone notice? I’m not sure what point you are trying to make. Covid 19 is heading for numbers 10 times that amount just in the US. Are you trying to compare the two? I'm a volunteer Critical Care EMT. I've seen a lot of people die. They die from the flu, heart attacks, strokes, car accidents, diabetes. One person in my county has died from COVID 19. That's one too many. But people continue to die from the flu, heart attacks, strokes, diabetes. Not as many car accidents now that people are staying home more. The CDC estimates between 24,000 and 62,000 Americans have died from the flu this year yet a lot of people don't bother getting immunized. A lot of coronary artery disease and other serious illnesses are the result of lifestyle choices but people continue making those unhealthy choices. I've gone on calls for people who are having difficulty breathing and when we get there they ask us to wait until they're done smoking their cigarette. COVID 19 can be avoided by staying home. Most who do get it will recover with no permanent disability, unlike when I was young and people who became sick with polio were often disabled for the rest of their lives. Yes, it's bad that a lot of people are dying from it but people are dying from a lot of things and that isn't going to stop. At least COVID 19 doesn't seem to be killing our children like the flu does. And car accidents. And unmonitored swimming pools. And child abuse. I guess I'm not sure what my point was.
rltorpey 04/01/20 11:13am Around the Campfire
RE: 2019–20 CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC POSTINGS

CDC estimates there were between 140 and 360 flu related deaths in the US each day for the past 6 months. Did anyone notice?
rltorpey 04/01/20 08:48am Around the Campfire
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