Trailer Life Magazine Open Roads Forum: Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Restoration & Vintage RVs

 > Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Page  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 318  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 10/10/18 09:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Decided to get rid of some scrap from the motor home today, while the weather was still reasonably decent. It's supposed to rain tomorrow, some from Hurricane Michael.

So, we figured we'd just let it rain. I had a bunch of steel that I wanted to get rid of, which we did. I still have more, but this stuff was in the garage, and kind of in my way. It also helps when you get paid for scrap, instead of paying to get rid of it!

After tomorrow, it's supposed to really cool off, and get back to normal averages for us for this time of the year, which is daytime highs in the 50's, instead of the 80's we've been having.

Tonight I don't really have much of an update of any work on the motor home, cause I didn't do anything. Lol.

Saw a little of the update on the hurricane, and that's not good for those people down there affected by it.

I'll try to get something done tomorrow so I can give an update.

Be safe out there!


If you want to do something, you will find a way.
If you don't, you will find an excuse.

-------------------------------------------------

Good judgement comes from experience.
A lot of experience, comes from bad judgement.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 10/11/18 09:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

And rain it did!

Another day in what would seem to be rainy Seattle, except we are in the East, not the West Coast! What a year. Lol.

So, we just let it rain, and took a break today.

I had some computer work to do today, which took up a lot of my day.

Ya gotta love Windows updates, especially when, after an update, the computer runs slower than molasses in January, as my dad used to say.

Hey, more motor home money! Lol.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 10/11/18 09:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I do have a question though, and am looking for some input.

What do ya think about putting down a layer of plywood, glued to the top of the floor joists, and then add 1 inch of extruded poly foam insulation on top of the plywood, and then, add another layer of plywood on top of the foam board insulation, all of it glued together.

That will be similar to what I am doing on the walls, which is insulate the floor, while breaking the thermal barrier from the steel floor joists, and cut the amount of heat/cold transferring from the joists through the plywood into the plywood flooring.

Lay it on me. What's wrong with this picture? Possible repercussions from gluing this sandwich in, on top of the floor joists, instead of how the factory did it, which was aluminum on the bottom of the joists, poly foam in between the joists, and plywood glued to the top.

The foam insulation has a weight rating of supporting 25 lbs per sq inch, and is used under concrete to insulate a concrete floor, so it can support a fair amount of weight.

Tell me what ya think!

62 and sunny tomorrow! Yay!!!

Bill.Satellite

Full-timer

Senior Member

Joined: 12/25/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 10/12/18 07:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would put something between the outside of the chassis and the floor that is water proof like alum to keep the plywood from rotting with time. Even inside bays, there's a lot of moisture out there. Many manufacturers use ply, foam, ply sandwiches so if the construction is done properly is should be just fine.


What I post is my 2 cents and nothing more. Please don't read anything into my post that's not there. If you disagree, that's OK.
Can't we all just get along?

STBRetired

I-80 and I-55

Senior Member

Joined: 11/23/2015

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 10/12/18 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That would work, as long as you do something to keep water away from the bottom side. You will need to use a fairly thick plywood, like 1/2" to spread out the point loads. A chair makes only about 4 or 5 square inches of contact with the floor. With me sitting in that chair, there is way more than 25 PSI at the contact points. Thicker plywood will resist deflection and spread that load out over a much wider area. Also, is that 25 PSI rating a static load rating or a live load rating? This will also eat up a portion of the added height you gained when you bowed the roof joists. I think the choice of glue to bond the foam to the ply will be critical. I would use whatever the foam manufacturer recommends for attachment to plywood. Might also get a stronger bond if the side of the plywood glued to the foam was not painted with POR 15. And stagger your joints so none of them line up.


1999 Newmar MACA 3796 F53 6.8L
2016 Ford Edge Sport
Roadmaster Sterling A/T with Brake Buddy


wildmanbaker

Kennewick, Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 02/24/2005

View Profile






Posted: 10/12/18 10:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Foam insulation has very little structural strength, or tinsel strength, you may need some wood ribs between the 2 layers of plywood to support the top layer, and prevent the insulation from foam dust from constant pressure and movement. Wood has a fairly high resistance to heat flow, so you will not be loosing much insulation. The floor is the "live load" support of the motorhome, and needs to be fairly strong. Put the palms of your hands together and try to rub them. This is the same forces that will be at work on most structural assemblies. Screws and glue are the strongest methods of construction. Just thoughts.


Wildmanbaker


PastorCharlie

NC

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2004

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 10/12/18 05:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fulltimin wrote:

And a little closer .....



[image]


There is still a lot of orbital sanding marks in your sample.

PastorCharlie

NC

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2004

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 10/12/18 05:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think you would be better served by putting your foam insulation below the chassis between the aluminum and frame. Fill all frame cavities with fiberglass insulation.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 10/12/18 08:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bill.Satellite wrote:

I would put something between the outside of the chassis and the floor that is water proof like alum to keep the plywood from rotting with time. Even inside bays, there's a lot of moisture out there. Many manufacturers use ply, foam, ply sandwiches so if the construction is done properly is should be just fine.



I do plan on covering the bottom of the floor joists with a minimum of aluminum, to keep the joists and anything between the joists from absorbing moisture from the bottom.

Driving in rain will throw up a lot of liquid up there.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 10/12/18 08:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

STBRetired wrote:

That would work, as long as you do something to keep water away from the bottom side. You will need to use a fairly thick plywood, like 1/2" to spread out the point loads. A chair makes only about 4 or 5 square inches of contact with the floor. With me sitting in that chair, there is way more than 25 PSI at the contact points. Thicker plywood will resist deflection and spread that load out over a much wider area. Also, is that 25 PSI rating a static load rating or a live load rating? This will also eat up a portion of the added height you gained when you bowed the roof joists. I think the choice of glue to bond the foam to the ply will be critical. I would use whatever the foam manufacturer recommends for attachment to plywood. Might also get a stronger bond if the side of the plywood glued to the foam was not painted with POR 15. And stagger your joints so none of them line up.




Aluminum on the bottom should work, and doesn't have to be very thick. Just something to repel water, and moisture.

I think the 25 psi is total load.

Adding a 1" of insulation plus a second plywood floor, will chew up about 1.5" more space. That should not be real noticeable, since the center is raised close to 8 inches.

I don't plan on painting the gluing side with Por 15. Only the top side and the edges of the flooring plywood will be painted with Por.

Staggering joints is always a good thing.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Page  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 318  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Restoration & Vintage RVs

 > Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2018 CWI, Inc. © 2018 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS