Motorhome Magazine Open Roads Forum: New models with 4x4 with cabover bunk?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  All

 > New models with 4x4 with cabover bunk?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
Rickj91

Okanagan, B.C.

Full Member

Joined: 03/28/2010

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 08:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

http://www.countryrv.net/Class-C-Motorhomes/Adventurer-Adventurer/Quad-2016/19/4392/
Adventurer Makes one as per the add for a 2016 at a dealer in Kelowna, Brititsh Columbia. I'm sure if you go to their website you could get more info.


2005 Chev 2500HD D/A,EC,SB,32 in. Hitch Ex. 2013 Wolf Creek 850 SB, 2007 Mirage 6X12 Cargo Trlr

maddog348

Bakersfield,CA

Senior Member

Joined: 04/08/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 09:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Koooool !!! $$$$$$$$$$$$$ JM2ยข

Photomike

Southern Alberta or where the camper is parked!

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 09:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You already got some great responses but here is what I have found.

I had a TCer on a GMC 2500HD 4x4 and I loved it but honestly the 4x4 was hardly used as it was just so heavy, and most of that was top heavy, so I was not comfortable going anyplace that was not almost perfectly level as I could feel the rig sway like it was going to tip. Plus with the weight of the unit no winch would get me out of a situation if I did get stuck, I would need something big to get me unstuck so I stayed in the front country with it.

I sold the TCer and got a small Class C (19') with the thought that I would be able to take it the same places that I could take the TCer and if it would go there I could do a 4x4 conversion if I wanted - boy was I wrong! The extra width of the Class C was insane, even on back roads I was hitting the mirror on trees on the side of the road so trails were out of the question. Add to that the creaking that the unit made on rough roads and I was afraid to take it any place rough. There is a road I like to drive on and even with my Dodge Journey it bounces and creaks the vehicle, with the Class C and the weight it was more than a creak I thought it was going to split in half and that was only on about 20' of the road so I turned back, I could not imagine a rough trail.

I have since bought a Ford Transit and added a bed, portable propane stove, porta potti, will add a 12V fridge and a heater and use this for the rougher stuff. The weight is low, not a lot of extra weight like cupboards and tables and it is narrower. May upgrade if / when I need a 4x4 but at this time happy with what I got.

I have looked at everything available new and used and could not justify the cost, weight and size to take it on trails.


2011 Majestic 19G
2017 Ford Transit (conversion underway)
EVO Electric bike
Advanced Elements Kayaks
Border Collie Guard Dog

pnichols

Santa Cruz Mountains

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 01/10/18 11:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fugawi wrote:

We are based in Las Vegas and will travel mostly in the southwest US on short trips. There are some dirt roads that we would like to explore. Some, while pretty free from vegetation, do have decent grades and sometimes rutted surfaces that may be difficult for traction. In addition, a little extra clearance would be helpful.

Also, while we don't plan to travel in snow or rain, it would be nice to have a little extra traction in case we end up in that situation.

I like the idea of the Winnebago Revel, but we really want two decent-sized beds. I haven't seen a 4x4 Class B that pulls off the two beds, thus the corner bed and cabover bunk of a Class C.

I hope Winnebago or others push the 4x4 chassis to models with just a bit more room and sleeping capacity.


They way you want to use a Class C reads very close to the way we use ours here in the Southwest when going to and camping in remote areas rockhounding.

We have a relatively short (24 foot) Winnebago Itasca cabover bed Class C that we specifically bought new because it was built on what I call an "overkill" chassis ... the Wnnebago optional Ford E450 van chassis - which is not usually required for only a 24 foot Class C, weight-wise.

Here's just some comments on it and our use of it - not in any particular order - that may be of use when you are shopping:

1. The E450 chassis has a slightly wider rear stance than the Ford E350 (and probably wider than the Mercedes 3500 and other chassis brands, too) - to provide better stability on sideways slanted roads, highway curves, and in high cross-winds.

2. The E450 has just plain more rugged construction -> larger brakes, a lower rear differential ratio, a larger diameter drive shaft, a larger rear differential ring gear, and - perhaps most important of all - a thicker steel frame for better end to end platform rigidity to help prevent twisting of the frame (and consequent twisting of the coach structure) on rutted roads.

3 . On only a 24 foot Class C, the E450 chassis provides load carrying capacity higher than what you could probably ever load it to - just in case you want to carry a lot of stuff with no concerns - like we do.

4. The under-loaded E450's frame sits higher than a lighter rated chassis would. This provides better ground clearance for all underside components attached to the coach structure, such as drain plumbing, built-in generators, built-in propane tanks, battery boxes, etc..

5. For our chassis year, the E450 had hydraulic boosted power brakes instead of vacuum boosted brakes as on the E350 ... however both Ford chassis may be hydraulic now.

6. From the rear tires on back, our coach walls immediately begin a straight upward slant to the rear bumper- thus providing a somewhat improved rear departure angle than other, or longer, Class C motorhomes. Many Class C coach walls go straight back horizontally aways from the rear duals before starting their upward slant to the rear bumper ... thus offering two more places to scrape when going across desert road washouts.

7. We do not need any wheels in the rear to prevent bumper/frame dragging when going into parking lots or driveways ... or when going across desert road washouts at an angle.

8. I use different tires (215/85R16) than what came stock on it (225/75R16). These tires have the same load rating, but they are taller to provide a bit more ground clearance for everything. These tires also have a narrower treadprint ... which provides slightly better traction on snow and ice that's over a hard road surface (due to more pounds per square inch of rubber contact) ... but this also provides a bit more tire to tire sidewall clearance between the rear duals so as to help prevent wedging of rocks in between the rear dually tires.

9. All of our exterior cabinets, the generator, the propane tank, and the drain plumbing are mounted up high at, or close, to frame height. There is nothing hanging down visibilty when viewed from the outside.

10. The automatic entrance step recedes back and winds up at coach wall height - it does not hang below the coach wall when retracted.

11. The E450's lower rear differential ratio is great for very slow speed crawling on washboaded or rutted dirt and gravel roads.

12. A Class C can have a pretty decent (i.e. relatively low) center of gravity even though it may "look high". It's heavy items such as it's propane tank, it's fuel tank, it's black tank, it's grey tank, it's built-in generator, and all of your stuff in exterior storage cabinets - all contribute to a low center of gravity - probably a lower center of gravity than most truck campers (especially when compared to 4X4 truck campers with their lifted bodies).

13. Washboarded, rutted, and rocky roads MUST BE driven ultra-slowly .. but it can be done carefully with a small Class C so as to prevent structure twisting, high centering, coach structure scraping, or excessive washboard pounding. Our records so far are A) ~25 miles (each way) at 7-10 MPH to camp and rockhound at a desert site in dry weather on a severly washboarded gravel road that was otherwise wide and flat, and B) crawling rock by rock in our 2WD Class C on a rough 4X4 road in Death Valley going to/from a remote campsite in dry weather - after traveling several miles as in A) to reach the 4X4 road.

14. Do not get a Class C with slides. Slides inherently weaken the coach's wall structure and can get damaged from rough road travel and maybe leave you stranded if stuck in the extended position.

15. I believe that some of the top manufacturers - such as Coach House and Lazy Daze - build (or used to build) even their small Class B+ and C models exclusively on only the Ford E450 chassis for the additional ruggedness and overall dependability in all situations.

Just the right Class C setup can be used carefully in dry weather to get way out there. But once out there: There is no substitute for being able to eat lunch in the desert heat with air conditioning, giving the dog a bath with the outside shower and then drying her/him off with a generator powered hair dryer, or watching movies in the evening in complete comfort ... and then going to sleep in up to two queen beds and one full bed in a small Class C with a dinette, a rear corner bed, and an overcab bed. [emoticon]

* This post was last edited 01/10/18 02:09pm by pnichols *   View edit history


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/14/2007

View Profile



Posted: 01/10/18 11:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fugawi wrote:



We are based in Las Vegas and will travel mostly in the southwest US on short trips. There are some dirt roads that we would like to explore. Some, while pretty free from vegetation, do have decent grades and sometimes rutted surfaces that may be difficult for traction. In addition, a little extra clearance would be helpful.

Also, while we don't plan to travel in snow or rain, it would be nice to have a little extra traction in case we end up in that situation.


A Tiger could do all that and mine frequently does, mostly on unpaved roads in the southwest. I've been driving small 4x4 C's (under 20 feet long) for over 25 years. See a few of my trip reports at TC forum trip reports; scroll way down the list or search for Tiger4x4RV.

Points of note: high clearance has usually been more necessary than 4WD, but I still use 4WD at least a bit on almost every trip. Limited-slip has come in handy a few times. Low center of gravity is good. The smallest width of rig is best; my Tiger is 87" wide, and its predecessor was only 81". Short wheel base helps.

All RV travel on rutted or washboarded roads needs to be SLOW, like 5-10 MPH, or you'll be dealing with damage to your rig.


2006 Tiger CX 4x4, 8.1 L gas V-8, Allison 6-speed


Sprink-Fitter

Anywhere we want to be.

Senior Member

Joined: 10/23/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 12:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jaxom wrote:

I wonder if a selectable locker in the rear axle would give him what he needs?


Who?


2006 Coachman Adrenaline 228FB

2012 Can Am Commander XT 1000

Ductape

On the Road

Senior Member

Joined: 11/15/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 01:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dynamax Isata 5.


49 States, 6 Provinces, 2 Territories...

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

Senior Member

Joined: 02/26/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/10/18 01:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Consider purchasing a brand new E350 or E450 based motor home and drive it to Quigley. They will convert it into a 4x4 for you. CLICK HERE for the details direct from Quigley.

The Phoenix Cruiser is offered with the Quigley 4x4 conversion, as do other small RV manufactures. It seems feasible to find and purchase the perfect E350/E450 motor home, then get it converted immediately afterward. I hear Quigley does only brand new rigs, not used rigs. Surely you would need to call Quigley and make sure their conversion works for the make and model you decide is right for you.

* This post was edited 01/10/18 01:48pm by ron.dittmer *


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/14/2007

View Profile



Posted: 01/10/18 02:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tigers are build on stock 4x4 pickup truck chassis - Chevy, Ford, or Dodge.

pnichols

Santa Cruz Mountains

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 01/10/18 05:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Those Tiger Bengals are indeed kindof a "poor man's Earthroamer" ... and as such offer superb value in a compact, easy to get service and maintain, back country capable camper. In 4X4 configuration they are well integrated, have a low center of gravity, and are a narrow and not too tall compact little abode for traveling and camping way out there anywhere that a 4X4 truck camper can go.

A 4X4 Bengal is what I would like to have if younger, but when younger we did enjoy something similar - a 1969 Chinook built on a GMC one-ton 2WD dually chassis. Now, it takes our small Class C to provide the necessary comfort, tank sizes, and storage convenience for several days of drycamping.

P.S. I notice that Tiger has discontinued their other models.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  All

 > New models with 4x4 with cabover bunk?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2018 CWI, Inc. © 2018 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS