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drsteve

Michigan

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Posted: 02/12/18 05:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PastorCharlie wrote:

A 1350 watt A/C uses less current than a 1500 watt floor heater. 1350 watts pull 11.25 AMPs. It will do just fine on either a 15 or 20 AMP circuit.


A heater is different, it has a steady draw. A 13,500 BTU AC compressor draws 40+ amps on startup, about 12.5 running. Hot weather also affects the draw when running. In the real world, I've never had good luck running a 13.5 AC on a 15 amp circuit, especially if an extension cord is involved. A 20 amp circuit does it no problem.


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jkwilson

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Posted: 02/12/18 08:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PastorCharlie wrote:

A 1350 watt A/C uses less current than a 1500 watt floor heater. 1350 watts pull 11.25 AMPs. It will do just fine on either a 15 or 20 AMP circuit.


How many RVs have 1350W AC?

Most are at least 13,500 BTU/hr which translates into at least 2000W with starting current over 3000W.

And I can tell you from first hand experience you can’t run them with an adapter on a 15 or 20A circuit without burning up adapters.


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pianotuna

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Posted: 02/12/18 10:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While PastorCharlie is confused, you are not correct either.

By direct measurement, my 13500 btu Dometic draws as little as 1100 watts continuous and as much as 1900 watts depending on the ambient temperature and how long it has been running. Start up surge may be as much as six times the running wattage.

The reason that adapters burn is because of low voltage. That can be addressed by having an autoformer to boost the voltage.

jkwilson wrote:

PastorCharlie wrote:

A 1350 watt A/C uses less current than a 1500 watt floor heater. 1350 watts pull 11.25 AMPs. It will do just fine on either a 15 or 20 AMP circuit.


How many RVs have 1350W AC?

Most are at least 13,500 BTU/hr which translates into at least 2000W with starting current over 3000W.

And I can tell you from first hand experience you can’t run them with an adapter on a 15 or 20A circuit without burning up adapters.



Regards, Don
Full Time in a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

jkwilson

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Posted: 02/13/18 04:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

While PastorCharlie is confused, you are not correct either.

By direct measurement, my 13500 btu Dometic draws as little as 1100 watts continuous and as much as 1900 watts depending on the ambient temperature and how long it has been running. Start up surge may be as much as six times the running wattage.

The reason that adapters burn is because of low voltage. That can be addressed by having an autoformer to boost the voltage.

jkwilson wrote:

PastorCharlie wrote:

A 1350 watt A/C uses less current than a 1500 watt floor heater. 1350 watts pull 11.25 AMPs. It will do just fine on either a 15 or 20 AMP circuit.



How many RVs have 1350W AC?

Most are at least 13,500 BTU/hr which translates into at least 2000W with starting current over 3000W.

And I can tell you from first hand experience you can’t run them with an adapter on a 15 or 20A circuit without burning up adapters.


An autoformer can't make any difference. The power that comes out of an autoformer will always be a little less than what goes in, so adding an autoformer results in the RV drawing more current through the adapter.

Low voltage has no direct effect on an adapter. If you have low voltage at a 15/20A outlet, it is either wired wrong or you are drawing too much current out of it.

CavemanCharlie

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Posted: 02/13/18 07:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I run the AC in my TT on a 20 amp circuit in my machine shed all the time. It is the only thing running on that circuit. I do have a voltage meter to keep a eye on the voltage. I've never had a problem even when the compressor kicks in.

I also feel the plugs and the connector once and awhile to make sure that they are not getting too hot.

CavemanCharlie

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Posted: 02/13/18 07:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

If someone has a dinosaur electrical system they should be spending the $$$ to bring it to modern times instead of buying an RV. I know, harsh!


True,I agree... But the way the regulations are set up around here you can purchase a fairly good used RV for less money then what it will cost to rewire everything in your yard. Even a brand new pop up camper or smaller TT would be less money.

The mistake people made was not upgrading the electrical system decades ago when it was still affordable. If you didn't do it then you can't afford to do it now. Your stuck. And, it sucks to be you.

pianotuna

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Posted: 02/13/18 11:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi jk,

shore power outlet-->autoformer-->rv cord

That configuration will raise the voltage and lower the amperage. The number of watts stays the same.

Without the autoformer to support the voltage the amperage must go up--and that may do damage to the air conditioner. It may also melt plugs and adapters because they are carrying too many amps.

It is true there will be some losses from using the autoformer. But it allows me to run my roof air when shore power is low voltage. So far the worst I've seen is 97 volts. The autoformer raised it up to a safe value.

I use my autoformer in the winter as well so that I get the full benefit from electric heaters.

jkwilson wrote:

An autoformer can't make any difference. The power that comes out of an autoformer will always be a little less than what goes in, so adding an autoformer results in the RV drawing more current through the adapter.

Low voltage has no direct effect on an adapter. If you have low voltage at a 15/20A outlet, it is either wired wrong or you are drawing too much current out of it.


westend

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Posted: 02/14/18 07:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'd suggest to get someone with professional experience to help you integrate your RV electrical system into your house. I do electrical repairs and it is all too common to find poorly distributed power as an owner upgrades to accommodate additional power needs.

FWIW, here is what I did: Added a 75A subpanel into my garage/shop. The 75A panel powers a 50 amp receptacle for RV power and a 50A receptacle for a welder. I also installed 4 X 120V GFCI duplex receptacles for various power tools and other garage/shop needs. So far, I have never tripped a breaker or tripped a GFCI circuit. I would do the same again, even if I had a 30 amp rated RV electrical system. It is easy to just pull three wires to a new 30A receptacle but is difficult to add in that fourth power wire for 240V service, should the need arise in the future. Also, with 50A service, wire size is increased so voltage drop becomes a non-issue.


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Bobbo

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Posted: 02/14/18 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Hi jk,

shore power outlet-->autoformer-->rv cord

That configuration will raise the voltage and lower the amperage. The number of watts stays the same.

Without the autoformer to support the voltage the amperage must go up--and that may do damage to the air conditioner. It may also melt plugs and adapters because they are carrying too many amps.

While that is true at the RV, at the outlet that the RV is plugged into, the amperage goes up. The way the Autoformer works is by pulling extra amps from the outlet and converts them to the extra voltage. It actually makes it easier to overheat the plug/outlet and/or pop the breaker feeding the RV.


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wnjj

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Posted: 02/14/18 08:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westend wrote:

I'd suggest to get someone with professional experience to help you integrate your RV electrical system into your house. I do electrical repairs and it is all too common to find poorly distributed power as an owner upgrades to accommodate additional power needs.

FWIW, here is what I did: Added a 75A subpanel into my garage/shop. The 75A panel powers a 50 amp receptacle for RV power and a 50A receptacle for a welder. I also installed 4 X 120V GFCI duplex receptacles for various power tools and other garage/shop needs. So far, I have never tripped a breaker or tripped a GFCI circuit. I would do the same again, even if I had a 30 amp rated RV electrical system. It is easy to just pull three wires to a new 30A receptacle but is difficult to add in that fourth power wire for 240V service, should the need arise in the future. Also, with 50A service, wire size is increased so voltage drop becomes a non-issue.

If someone only has a 30A RV, a compromise would be to pull wires for 240V of a size for 50A service but cap one wire off on both ends and install a 30A 120V breaker and receptacle. That way there’s no need for dogbone to plug in at home and easy to upgrade later if needed and there’s still the larger wire lower voltage drop benefit.

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