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turbojimmy

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Posted: 10/03/18 10:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

I WILL point out that I have NO, ZERO, NADA, NOTHING "fear" of Propane or NG. In fact, in my Sticks and bricks I have a NG Furnace, NG water heater, NG stove, for further insult, I have a NG furnace in my 3 1/2 stall garage. The only single appliance I have that is not NG is the dryer.

It isn't "fear" that causes me to not use propane appliances much in my TT, it is the mere fact that using PROPANE FOR ANYTHING IS EXPENSIVE!! You pay twice as much as NG and get LESS BTUs, even paying for electric is cheaper than Propane.

On top of that is the mere fact with a propane fridge, you USE MUCH MORE ENERGY, takes 275W-325W worth of electric or propane. My home fridge conversion sips at a mere 90W of electricity and it only does that for about 20 minutes per hr..

We don't bother to take showers in our RV, why?

Campground showers tend to have more space, easier to get in and out of and don't have to ration the water (try telling a "teen" to cut back on the 20 minute showers at full force)..

So, our water heater spends most of it's life idling with just a pilot light and the burner only really runs when we draw hot water for cleaning dishes..

Cooking inside, well, lets put it this way, when camping in the deep south in early June with scorching 99-105 temps during the day, using a propane stove inside is just not happening.. and at those temps no need for the furnace..

Yep, that is why I have used a mere 30 lbs of propane in 11 yrs..


My post wasn't necessarily directed at you, but since we're here...

Propane has more than twice the BTU of NG per cubic foot but at this point in time it's ridiculously expensive. When I first bought my house at the very end (December 30) of 2015 it was fueled with propane. By February I had burned through around 400 gallons - the previous owner (a couple) said they were paying $500/month for propane. I'm a family of 5 and knew that wasn't going to fly. I had NG brought to the house which cost around $4k (it's a 500-foot run, I did the appliance conversions myself). It's already paid for itself. I use the 1,000 gallon tank for grilling now and as a backup fuel source for my generator (NG is primary).

I don't know where you get a 90W fridge. The fridge in my house has a 1400-watt startup and over 700W while running. It's a run-of-the-mill GE double-door. Nothing elaborate. The RV fridge is 300-watts. On a per-cubic-foot basis the gas absorbtion fridges are much less efficient than, say, the Samsung residential-type fridges that run at 100-200 watts but the trade-off is in the flexibility of using propane. Costs aside, the energy used in generating the 300-watts electricity is horribly inefficient compared to using propane.

And, again, it depends on how you camp. I need the propane for my fridge. I'm not going to run my generator 24x7 nor install a huge battery bank and solar array in my ancient rig. I also need heat a couple of times a year. Hot water? Heck yeah I need that. My hot water heater does not have a standing pilot and doesn't run much. Last, cooking with gas is easier, better and more efficient than any electric-based means. Yeah charcoal is best but I ain't got time for that. I have an extend-a-stay hooked up to my on-board propane tank for outdoor cooking.


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2gypsies

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Posted: 10/03/18 12:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

Has anyone ever stopped using propane completely ?

More storage without a furnace and less weight too.


No, you don't have to use the furnace or propane tank. Camp the way is most comfortable for you. There are no 'rules'. However, I hope you're not considering taking out the furnace, etc. You would have a hard time selling it.

Opposite of this is that we rarely used electric - just propane and solar.


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doxiemom11

Arizona

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Posted: 10/03/18 03:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In some areas, the cost of propane is cheaper than electric --- and the desert sure does get cold at night. We prefer to use our furnace rather than leave an electric heater plugged in and running while we sleep. I used to pay insurance claims and those electric heaters can start fires. If you are awake and present, you can react to signals of danger and prevent a fire - not so much when you are sleeping. Many rural houses heat with propane furnaces, have propane clothes dryers , propane kitchen stoves etc so I also do not understand the people afraid to use their furnaces.

theoldwizard1

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Posted: 10/03/18 04:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jplante4 wrote:

Plus camping with an old 2 burner Coleman stone and a Mr Buddy heater isn't exactly camping without propane.

True ! Neither are really required if you are willing to fire up the generator.

MetalGator

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Posted: 10/04/18 07:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I love the propane on our new Motorhome. Only two things use it (propane/electric water heater and furnace). Our stove is induction and the oven is a convection oven. I live in Florida so rarely use the furnace and almost always use electric on the hot water heater. What I do use it for is our gas grill. I usually like cooking on charcoal but I found a nice portable gas grill that I really like. I took the regulator off and I can hook it up to the gas connection on the outside of the motor home. Both my wife and I work long hours during that week and are basically weekend warriors. Using the portable gas grill is really easy and convenient. I have a large propane tank on the motor home and it was full when we purchased a little over a year ago. I use the gas grill almost every trip multiple times and several times I have smoked ribs/brisket on it where the grill was going for 6+ hours. My tank is still 65% full.

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richclover

WY

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Posted: 10/04/18 07:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

memtb wrote:

We rarely have a 50 amp “current bush” where we do most of our camping, and often the temps are near or below O F, so on an extended boondocking trip, we do use propane....lots of propane! [emoticon]


Hi, Todd!

Nope, no “current bushes” in my part of the state. We haven’t had our first snow yet. It’s been warm and very dry... until now. We’re putting a cold weather/snow test on the new rig next week for a week-long elk camp.

I’m hoping the new remote start generator will do okay. Some extra gas will be aboard.

We’re sure to burn through most of two 30 lb propane tanks [emoticon]


Rich
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memtb

Wyoming

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Posted: 10/04/18 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

richclover wrote:

memtb wrote:

We rarely have a 50 amp “current bush” where we do most of our camping, and often the temps are near or below O F, so on an extended boondocking trip, we do use propane....lots of propane! [emoticon]


Hi, Todd!

Nope, no “current bushes” in my part of the state. We haven’t had our first snow yet. It’s been warm and very dry... until now. We’re putting a cold weather/snow test on the new rig next week for a week-long elk camp.

I’m hoping the new remote start generator will do okay. Some extra gas will be aboard.

We’re sure to burn through most of two 30 lb propane tanks [emoticon]


Rich, I bet you will “burn thru” 2 - 30 pounders pretty quickly! Last year,a late Nov. early Dec., 22 day trip....we “ burned thru” close to 50 gallons ( 200+ pounds)! But...we had a “very comfortable” elk camp!


Todd & Marianne
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BarabooBob

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Posted: 10/04/18 05:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For those that want to use electricity whenever possible, what about when you camp where there is no electricity and you are not allowed to run your generator, at any time? This summer my wife and I stayed at a state park (can't remember the state), at 6:00am. this monster bus parked about 100 yards away decides to fire up his generator and the extremely noisy diesel engine. One of the other campers went over to ask him to turn it off until 8:00 am which was when generators were allowed, the jack-a$$ would not even answer the door. He then decided to start reving the engine. We found a ranger and this moron was escorted out of the park and his reservations were canceled without a refund. A bunch of us stood near the road and applauded as he drove by. And people wonder why campers don't like generators.


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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/05/18 12:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BarabooBob wrote:

For those that want to use electricity whenever possible, what about when you camp where there is no electricity and you are not allowed to run your generator, at any time?


Your question above is about campsites in which you're not allowed to run a generator at all ... i.e. no generator-allowed hours.

These are usually "tents only" type campsites - and often are not large enough for RVs, or have campsites that are so unlevel that RVs cannot be leveled adequately, or are outright posted as "No RVs".

Unfortunately those camping areas are often very beautiful and highly attractive to us with our relatively small RV. If we find those type camping areas and they're not outright posted as "No RVs", we can charge our batteries by merely idling our ultra-quiet main engine which cannot be heard a few feet away.

With our idling main engine we can of course also keep the interior cool with the cab air if the camping is during hot and/or high humidity daytime weather. Our other RV appliances are propane based, so are quiet.

By the way, it is possibe for tenters to sometimes need and use small generators. In addition to our built-in generator, we carry along in our motorhome a small ultra-quiet portable suitcase generator that was probably intended for both small RVs and tenters when it was introduced in the 1980s. We sometimes use this for battery charging in noise-sensitve campsites instead of idling the main engine.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

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Posted: 10/05/18 12:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

Has anyone ever stopped using propane completely ?

I don't see a big benefit for the cost, unless you plan on boondocking for a week ! Most people camp in warm weather and if you are plugged in, there are always electric space heaters. Induction cook top, InstaPot, microwave or convection oven for cooking. Residential refrigerator (they work better in extreme conditions anyway). Water heater would have a longer recovery time.

Even if I did want to boondock for a night or two, I always carry an old Coleman stove so bacon and eggs in the AM is not a problem. Some disposable propane bottles and a Mr Heater Buddy Heater would be good to knock the chill out in the AM if I was concerned. More storage without a furnace and less weight too.
Aside from the fact that your premise above (in red) is not at all accurate, your last paragraph made me laugh a bit. "More storage without a furnace and less weight too." Ummm...and then you fill that storage (and offset that weight savings) with a coleman stove, Instapot, electric space heater, Mr Heater Buddy heater, disposable propane bottles, etc...got it! So what was the advantage again?


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