Trailer Life Magazine Open Roads Forum: Beginning RVing: Winterizing Question
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Beginning RVing

Open Roads Forum  >  Beginning RVing

 > Winterizing Question

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
JoshuaH

Jefferson City, Mo

Full Member

Joined: 06/09/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/05/18 09:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This summer we bought a 17Ft. Hybrid camper that replaced a pop up. This is my first experience with a camper having a water heater, shower etc, the pop up just had 1 sink.

I've read about how to winterize using RV antifreeze, seems pretty easy. I was wondering, is there any reason why I can't use compressed air to blow out all the water in the lines? I have an air compressor, wouldn't be hard to make an adapter that will hook to the water connection.

Thanks!

DrewE

Vermont

Senior Member

Joined: 08/23/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/05/18 09:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There's no reason at all why that is impractical, and many people (including me) winterize that way all the time. Setting the regulator on the compressor to around 40 psi is plenty and will avoid possibly overpressurizing the water lines.

Basically, you drain the fresh water tank and water heater, open the low point drains, and run the water pump until it's completely dry (or as dry as it can get). It's not harmful to operate them dry for a few minutes (or more). Then, close the low point drains and hook up the compressor and bypass the water heater and, one by one, open each tap and low point drain until only air comes out. I usually go around a couple times to be sure everything is dry. Then just put a cupful of antifreeze in each of the drain traps and in the bottom of the toilet bowl and drain out any bit of water that collected in the gray or black tanks from the process. (I'm assuming you started with them empty; if not, just dump them normally.)

One advantage of blowing out with air is you don't have to rinse out antifreeze in the spring.





BobsYourUncle

Calgary Alberta Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/12/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/05/18 10:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JoshuaH wrote:

I have an air compressor, wouldn't be hard to make an adapter that will hook to the water connection.


You can buy one of those adapters at any RV parts store. They are cheap enough to get. They thread into your city water connection and then you attach the female end of your air hose chuck to it.


2007 GMC 3500 dually ext. cab 4X4 LBZ
Duramax / Allison
Fire Red

1997 Triple E Topaz 27' Bunkhouse TT


JoshuaH

Jefferson City, Mo

Full Member

Joined: 06/09/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/05/18 10:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks. We like to camp off grid in the winter, after pricing RV antifreeze I got to thinking I'm going to be spending a lot of money each time we go, would save some money to just blow out the lines.

I figured there was no reason I couldn't do it this way but wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something.

LarryJM

NoVa

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2007

View Profile



Posted: 10/06/18 03:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JoshuaH wrote:

Thanks. We like to camp off grid in the winter, after pricing RV antifreeze I got to thinking I'm going to be spending a lot of money each time we go, would save some money to just blow out the lines.

I figured there was no reason I couldn't do it this way but wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something.


Biggest issue with just blowing out the lines is that if your system has a low run of pipe you could end up with water in it after blowing out the lines since residual water could drain and collect in that low section, freeze and cause an issue. With that said many do just blow out their lines and the issues seem to be rare if you only do that as long as its a decent blowing out job.

My trailer only takes just over a gal of antifreeze so I just use that, but I don't use the trailer during the winter so I don't do multiple winterizations.

Larry

* This post was edited 10/06/18 04:25am by LarryJM *


2001 standard box 7.3L E-350 PSD Van with 4.10 rear and 2007 Holiday Rambler Aluma-Lite 8306S Been RV'ing since 1974.
RAINKAP INSTALL////ETERNABOND INSTALL


gbopp

The Keystone State

Senior Member

Joined: 08/03/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/06/18 03:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RV Blowout Plug

JaxDad

Greater Toronto Area

Senior Member

Joined: 08/02/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 10/06/18 05:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LarryJM wrote:

Biggest issue with just blowing out the lines is that if your system has a low run of pipe you could end up with water in it after blowing out the lines since residual water could drain and collect in that low section, freeze and cause an issue.

Larry


That could only be an issue if you don’t blow the lines out properly. I did an experiment a few years back for sceptical friend to show him how well it works. I took a 100’ coil of clear fuel hose and hooked to to tap, then with it standing vertically hooked it to the compressor with the regulator set to 50 psi. There wasn’t a drop left in the line.

The issue arises when someone uses a very small compressor that can’t maintain the required pressure for very long, or just doesn’t perform the task correctly.


JoshuaH wrote:

Thanks. We like to camp off grid in the winter, after pricing RV antifreeze I got to thinking I'm going to be spending a lot of money each time we go, would save some money to just blow out the lines.


That makes it sound like you think you’re going to put water back in the system each time you use it during the winter. That is a VERY dangerous proposition. You will have a lot of lines in places you can’t heat enough to prevent freezing.

LarryJM

NoVa

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2007

View Profile



Posted: 10/06/18 05:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JaxDad wrote:



That could only be an issue if you don’t blow the lines out properly. I did an experiment a few years back for sceptical friend to show him how well it works. I took a 100’ coil of clear fuel hose and hooked to to tap, then with it standing vertically hooked it to the compressor with the regulator set to 50 psi. There wasn’t a drop left in the line.

The issue arises when someone uses a very small compressor that can’t maintain the required pressure for very long, or just doesn’t perform the task correctly.


Depending on who you ask 50psi is more pressure by almost 2 times as what a lot of folks recommend for the max air pressure to blow out your lines and is from what I can tell at the very max of what anyone recommends. Of course the more pressure and larger capacity the better the job, but the question which is an unknown is for your particular trailer (especially with regards to its specific configuration like were the inlet for blowing out is in relation to say the water pump and low point drains) is just what is that pressure and air compressor capacity needed to do the job right and avoid the issue I mentioned. If you guess wrong it could be a fairly expensive mistake and you really are sort of guessing.

Larry

IB853347201

Eastern Ontario

Full Member

Joined: 06/18/2018

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/06/18 06:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always blow the lines out first with about 40 psi, and then pump thru RV antifreeze, just to be sure.
The cost of a few gallons of antifreeze is nothing compared to the cost of possible water damage or replacing burst water lines. Especially if the line is snaked thru a wall/cabinet.
Dont' forget to get the water out of the hotwater heater bypass...

JoshuaH

Jefferson City, Mo

Full Member

Joined: 06/09/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/06/18 07:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator



That makes it sound like you think you’re going to put water back in the system each time you use it during the winter. That is a VERY dangerous proposition. You will have a lot of lines in places you can’t heat enough to prevent freezing.

Well I didn't think that would be a problem as long as we kept the furnace running. I don't camp when its really cold, but possibly below freezing at night, 30s-40s during the day.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Beginning RVing

 > Winterizing Question
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Beginning RVing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2018 CWI, Inc. © 2018 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS