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 > Butane vs. Propane

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crasster

Dallas

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Posted: 02/06/20 04:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So I talked to a man that had an coach where the manual states that it can use both Butane AND Propane.

Which is better? Worse? Pros? Cons? Why?
Thanks!


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Dutch_12078

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Posted: 02/06/20 04:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Butane burns about 12% more efficiently than propane, but propane boils at a much lower temperature, making it the better choice for cold weather use. For most purposes in mild to warm weather, either one will get the job done. Unlike natural gas, appliances designed for propane typically work just as well on butane. Another option is isobutane, a combination of the two often favored by backpackers.


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wolfe10

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Posted: 02/06/20 04:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

butane has more BTU's per gallon, but (actually LARGE BUT) is has a lower boiling point.

So, if in cold climates/temperatures, propane is the correct LPG. If higher temperatures, butane is great.

Do a little research for boiling point on both and you can determine what is best for your locale.


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naturist

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Posted: 02/06/20 05:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I do not know about the fuel referenced above, which may be misnamed but chemically, isobutane is NOT a mixture or combination of propane and butane. There are two forms of the four carbon butane molecule possible, either a straight chain which is called n-butane and a central carbon with three pendant carbons, called isobutane. Both are butane, same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms, same molecular weight, but slightly different physical and chemical properties.

And no, butane does not have a lower boiling point (at 0 to 1 degree C) than propane (-42 degrees C).

Actually, three products are sold, propane, butane (actually a usually a mix of both isomers) and LP gas, a mixture of propane and butane.

* This post was last edited 02/06/20 06:06pm by naturist *   View edit history





theoldwizard1

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Posted: 02/06/20 06:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

naturist wrote:


Actually, three products are sold, propane, butane (actually a usually a mix of both isomers) and LP gas, a mixture of propane and butane.

Yep. What is commonly sold as "propane" (LP) is a blend. The percentages vary from location to location and time of year.

If you live in a northern/cold climate, you will be getting close to 100% propane in winter.

Lwiddis

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Posted: 02/06/20 07:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

“I talked to a man...” Why am I not impressed? Similar to advice in a fortune cookie?


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Fresno Tundra Driver

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Posted: 02/06/20 09:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

naturist wrote:

I do not know about the fuel referenced above, which may be misnamed but chemically, isobutane is NOT a mixture or combination of propane and butane. There are two forms of the four carbon butane molecule possible, either a straight chain which is called n-butane and a central carbon with three pendant carbons, called isobutane. Both are butane, same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms, same molecular weight, but slightly different physical and chemical properties.

And no, butane does not have a lower boiling point (at 0 to 1 degree C) than propane (-42 degrees C).

Actually, three products are sold, propane, butane (actually a usually a mix of both isomers) and LP gas, a mixture of propane and butane.


Nice to have an organic chemist in the group! [emoticon]


E.Lee Galik

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Posted: 02/07/20 05:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If I never camped below freezing BUTANE.. Since it occasionally gets down below freeZing where I hang out .. Propane.

WHY
Propane the vapor temp is right close to -40 (No sure exactly but within 2 degrees) -40 I'm seriously not going to be using the RV.

Butane I think it's 32.. So if the tank gets down to 30.. NO HEAT.

Many have bought propane in the deep south or so they thought, but the dealer filled the tank with Butane, which is cheaper, and pocketed the additional profit. Then they went north and no heat.


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dougrainer

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Posted: 02/07/20 06:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Butane is sold south of the border. There are probably no Gas retailers for Public sale FOR RV's and DOT cylinders that sell Butane anymore. They just quit selling both types in the USA years ago as there was no real need. You may be able to find some that do sell Butane, but why? Doug

RayJayco

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Posted: 02/07/20 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

Butane is sold south of the border. There are probably no Gas retailers for Public sale FOR RV's and DOT cylinders that sell Butane anymore. They just quit selling both types in the USA years ago as there was no real need. You may be able to find some that do sell Butane, but why? Doug


Butane is cheaper on wholesale level...

A couple months ago, I was discussing this with a friend in NO Cal during the rolling power outages due to the fires. He didn't want to consider a propane BU genny due to his friends that his lines froze up when it was 20F. I explained to him that in temperate climates you will often get butane as propane and butane are both LPG gas...
Call your supplier and ask to see the paperwork, you may be surprised...


Inquiring minds want to know...

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