Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Want to drive through Mexico, looking for truck advice
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Want to drive through Mexico, looking for truck advice

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev
Bedlam

PNW

Moderator

Joined: 06/13/2012

View Profile






Posted: 04/03/20 04:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would focus on purchasing SRW 1-ton trucks with gasoline engines. DRW trucks may be too hard to get through borders due to restrictions, smaller trucks will not have the payload you need and large diesels are not as popular which make getting parts and service an issue.


Chevy Sonic 1.8-Honda Passport C70B-Host Mammoth 11.5-Interstate Car Carrier 20-Joyner SandViper 250-Kawasaki Concours ZG1000-Paros 8' flatbed-Pelican Decker DLX 8.75-Ram 5500 HD-Tank Urban Touring 150SE-VW TransBuggy 1200


FireGuard

Frazier Park

Senior Member

Joined: 02/20/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/03/20 05:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would look for an early 2000s Ford F-250 supercab short bed with a V10.
You should be able to find one with less than 150k miles in your price range.


13Jeep Wrangler
07 Ragen 21FB
12 Yamaha Super Tenere
14 Suzuki DR 650

Supercharged111

Colorado Springs, CO

Full Member

Joined: 06/09/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/03/20 05:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lfrese wrote:

I was looking at a 2002 GMC Sierra 3500 Extended but consumer reports says the 2002 Sierra 1500 is not reliable so I dont think the 3500 would be great.


The 1500 ***** trannies and diffs, the HDs do not. There is nothing unreliable about a 2002 Sierra 3500 gasser unless it's lived a life of neglect. And the comment about a diesel going 300k and a gasser only going to 160k is equally ignorant. My 98 1500 with 350 is north of 270,000 miles and runs the same as it did when I bought it around 150k miles. Trans and diff were upgraded long ago. The LS motors found in 99+ trucks go even longer. 6.0/4L80E and 8.1/Allison combos are both very durable, long lasting powertrains.


2007 Lance 1131
1997 GMC K3500 crew cab supercharged dually

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/03/20 06:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lfrese wrote:

jdc1 wrote:

It will be VERY hard to find a diesel truck with under 150,000 miles for less than $10,000. You can find plenty of gassers for that, with under 100,000 miles. Campers on mini-trucks do not preform well. Too top heavy and not enough power.


What do you mean "mini-trucks" I am looking for a 3/4 to 1 ton truck.
Why are the diesels so expensive? I imagine they have just as many issues as the gassers and are more expensive to fix, no?


Under $10k Toys or Nissans, the biggest trucks you'll find are high miles old body style Tundras or high miles Titan. Both only suitable for a small truck camper. Depending on what model Capri you get, the small ones are totally suitable for a 1/2 ton, larger ones, not so much.
Diesels, yeah, under $10k and not a basket case = high miles. And for just toting a smaller TC around, 100% not necessary. Brand, model and drive train determines which are the "good ones" and which aren't.

Not being handy with vehicles is a decided disadvantage with older vehicles especially on the road, because even little things can sideline you if you don't know how or aren't prepared for otherwise "simple" repairs.

That said, there is a plethora of low or lower miles 90s to early 2000s gas pickups in every brand and size that are under $10k and would be very reliable transportation ("reliable" is dependent on how much you know and can fix though).

Quick Seattle CL search, examples. 90s Reg cab F350 460 V8 41k miles grampa truck, perfect cond, $7500. 97 Silverado 1500 ext cab 96k miles like new, $9900. 200 F250 V10, 137k miles great shape, $8500


Pick out the size of the truck you "want" to fit your camper needs, 1/2 ton or HD. Live with reg cab or ext cab, way cheaper than any crew cab models due to CC's popularity. And then find the right truck based on miles, service records and condition with less emphasis on brand.
Aside from general condition, transmission health is probably first on the list of important items assuming the truck is otherwise totally functional, IMO.
After that, get the truck and do all the maint and recommended repairs/services for the miles that you can't verify through existing records. (IE if it's 25 years old and has original radiator hoses, replace them and t stat and flush the coolant. And similar items)

Drive the truck for a while. Items or issues will pop up and you can get them taken care of on your terms.

Then go to Mexico!

The tough part, is people get rid of trucks because they are old, "unreliable" or pending repairs. One who can fix their own vehicles, this is an economical way to get a good vehicle. One who cant, every little thing is a big bill from the mechanic, compared to the cost of a usually simple part. If this wasn't the case there wouldn't be so many new cars sold! Presuming your on a tight budget based on your question, take this into consideration and force yourself to do all the things you can achieve on your own.
Example, bought an "old beater" commuter rig recently. Only 19 years old, 105k miles and honestly in very good condition. I've put about $500 into maint and repairs. However, if I paid someone to do it, it would have been a couple thousand in cost and I would call it an expensive lesson.
CO is an ok place for rust free vehicles, but the sun gets to vehicles that aren't garaged, if you find one that stayed out of the mountains. Honestly, the BEST place to look for old vehicles in good condition is the wet side of the mountains here in the PNW, OR and WA. Simply put a predominately cloudy, rainy, temperate climate is the healthiest place for vehicles to live to a ripe old age for a variety of reasons.

Hope this helps


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/03/20 06:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

And a search is a good thing to do. This topic also comes up about weekly. "What's the best budget truck for ____?"
Typically the _____ doesn't matter much. It's the things I said above that will find you a good rig. But you may find other useful suggestions in other threads.

* This post was edited 04/04/20 08:45am by Grit dog *

ppine

Northern Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 07/04/2016

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/04/20 08:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The world except for the US runs on diesel. Diesel outboard motors, diesel lawn mowers. Available in Mexico.

You do not want to tour Mexico in a bright and shiny outfit, because it makes you a target. Try to blend in. Find a dependable truck that does not look too good.

check with the State Dept, ask around so you be know which areas to avoid. After you get 50 miles from the border you will relatively safe if you know how to avoid the drug zones.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/04/20 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

And when you are looking at old vehicles, find one that’s in good condition but then don’t concentrate on what’s nice, but look at everything that might need repair.
Front end, brakes, minor leaks like axle and driveshaft seals.
Engine oil leaks are typically minor unless they’re front or rear main seals.
U joints. Original with plastic retainers on an old truck = may not last long.
Hoses and belts (minor, but still $)
Fluids
PS fluid clean red and no leaks (some GMs still use power steering fluid most are atf though)
Brake fluid. Look decent or like yesterday’s coffee. Old fluid = corrosion = more issues with calipers and master cyl
Trans. If not clean and mostly red, assume at min a service but it often gets neglected because people are lazy and trans fluid changes aren’t quite as easy or cheap as oil changes.
Tune up? Most vehicles are cheap and easy. The wrong cord Triton engines = high likelihood of stripping or breaking old spark plugs when changed.
Any electrical “modifications”. Shoddy old shadetree electrical work is a huge turn off to me due to the complexity of diagnosing some electrical issues.
Some more things to consider when looking.

ScottG

Bothell Wa.

Senior Member

Joined: 02/25/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/04/20 11:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A totalled truck of that discription is worth 10K or more.


Scott, Grace and Wesly
2003 Dodge 3500 4x4, 6 speed Cummins.
2018 Silver Fox 32A.
H0NDA eu2000i

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/04/20 12:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ScottG wrote:

A totalled truck of that discription is worth 10K or more.
??

Good point though. Salvage title trucks if they’ve proven themselves for a while And depending on the previous damage can also be a good buy. More truck for the money.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Want to drive through Mexico, looking for truck advice
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.