Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: NASA Annouces May 27 Return to Space from US
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > NASA Annouces May 27 Return to Space from US

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
PawPaw_n_Gram

On the Road Somewhere

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2012

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 04/17/20 08:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Today NASA announced the first scheduled launch of astronauts into space from United States soil since 2011.

Two astronauts are scheduled to be launched at 4:32pm EDT, May 27, from Launch Complex 39A at Cape Canaveral/ Kennedy Space Center in the Crew Dragon Capsule atop a Falcon 9 rocket - both manufactured and operated by Space-X Corporation.

NASA Press Release


Full-Time 2014 - ????

“Not all who wander are lost.”
"You were supposed to turn back at the last street."

2012 Ram 2500 Mega Cab
2014 Flagstaff 832IKBS TT


wa8yxm

Wherever I happen to park

Senior Member

Joined: 07/04/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/18/20 06:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Now NASA really knows how to "Socially Distance" [emoticon]

I have a "new" toy here. actually the "Toy" is a Raspberry Pi-2 I bought some years ago but finally had an excuse to take it out of the box so I could set up a Pi-Zero-W with Qnetgateway software for use with one of my D-Star Radios (ham radio) To set up QnetGateway I first had to install Raspberien and I went with the "light" version so then I had to install SSH and GIT and then GIT some stuff from a repository (This all makes sense if you are a linux person which I was not when I started this progject [emoticon] Well once I had SSH up and working I was able to switch the memory card (Equivlent of hard drive on a Doze box) to my spare Pi-Zero and finish set up there. Works great by the way.

I still had a memory cad left over so I did a full install of Raspberien on the Pi-2 and then installed HAMCLOCK.

HamClock is a multi-featured clock designed by/for Ham Radio operator.
It shows the time (Well it is a clock) both local and UTC (What used to be called Greenwich Meridian Time) It shows solar activity a couple different ways or band characteristics. IT can track the ISS or any of several other satellites or the moon. And more... Been fun figuring it out and also learning both the PI and Linux and finding what other programs I need (like xscreensaver).

That all was build up for the next line:
So it tells me the ISS is due overhead in about an hour.


Home is where I park it.
Kenwood TS-2000 housed in a 2005 Damon Intruder 377


Dutch_12078

Winters south, summers north

Senior Member

Joined: 10/07/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 04/18/20 07:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm really glad to see we'll finally be getting back into human space travel again, and doubly glad that SpaceX is taking the lead in the endeavor!


Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
Bigfoot Automatic Leveling System
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox baseplate


Dutch_12078

Winters south, summers north

Senior Member

Joined: 10/07/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 04/18/20 07:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

Now NASA really knows how to "Socially Distance" [emoticon]

...
That all was build up for the next line:
So it tells me the ISS is due overhead in about an hour.

I know it's lot's of fun to build these projects, but for everyone else that's interested in spotting the ISS from home, try this link that not only tells you when, but where to look.

Spot The Station

cewillis

Tucson, az, usa

Senior Member

Joined: 01/24/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 04/18/20 08:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PawPaw_n_Gram wrote:

Today NASA announced the first scheduled launch of astronauts into space from United States soil since 2011.


Congratulations, about time, and keep it up.


Cal


PawPaw_n_Gram

On the Road Somewhere

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2012

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 05/30/20 01:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Success!!!

59 years and 25 days after Alan Shephard, US astronauts have returned to space for the first time since 2011 aboard an craft launched from the US, built by a US company !!!

Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

Senior Member

Joined: 06/07/2004

View Profile



Posted: 05/30/20 07:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had two sets of kids/grandkids visiting - and we ALL stood, watched the launch, and cheered!! Pretty exciting stuff!

Moderator

Bowling Green, KY

Moderator

Joined: 01/19/2004

View Profile



Posted: 05/30/20 07:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We were due for some 'good news'!

wa8yxm

Wherever I happen to park

Senior Member

Joined: 07/04/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/31/20 04:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The Launch went off without a flaw.. The Falcon 1st stage booster returned to origin and landed perfectly (As they have in the past) that is one of the most impressive things about this space-x venture is they do not need to fish the 1st stage out.. Just go out and pick it up after it chills some on the pad.

Several other impressive events as well. like the period of maximum dynamic pressure or they throttled down to reduce it then back up after it was past. I do not recall that from the old days..

And it is a private company doing it.. That is both a mix of good and bad. Good that private companies are now doing it. bad the government is not.

PawPaw_n_Gram

On the Road Somewhere

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2012

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 05/31/20 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

The Launch went off without a flaw.. The Falcon 1st stage booster returned to origin and landed perfectly (As they have in the past) that is one of the most impressive things about this space-x venture is they do not need to fish the 1st stage out.. Just go out and pick it up after it chills some on the pad.


SpaceX does have to former launch pads a few miles south of the Launch Complex configured for vertical landings, however, this booster, and most of the 50 that they have successfully landed, came down on an unmanned 'barge' out in the ocean. It is about the size of a football field, and there is no one on board the ASDS Of Course I Still Love You.

The most amazing thing to me is that the head of the company said "Okay, it might take 50 failures before we learn how to do this."

There is a video out of what the SpaceX people call 'Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly' of some of the failures, and the video explains easily why there is no one on the landing ship.

wa8yxm wrote:

Several other impressive events as well. like the period of maximum dynamic pressure or they throttled down to reduce it then back up after it was past. I do not recall that from the old days..


Apparently that has been done for most of the almost 60 years of manned space flight. The first time I heard of it was when the Shuttle Challenger blew up in Jan 1986. The last words from the craft were "Roger, go for throttle up."

wa8yxm wrote:

And it is a private company doing it.. That is both a mix of good and bad. Good that private companies are now doing it. bad the government is not.


That is also a result of the costs of the Space Shuttle, and the issues uncovered after the Challenger disaster. SpaceX is one of two US companies working on private initiatives to fly men and woman into space. Boeing heads the other program, and is expected to get astronauts into orbit in about a year.

NASA sets the requirements, the safety requirements and more. Such as the used booster rockets. SpaceX has used many to launch a second, even a third time.

However for manned missions, only new, unused boosters may be used. NASA and SpaceX are very conscious of the risks involved with these things which are really just huge, dangerous explosives they are trying to set off in a planned manner.

I will always remember Eric Sevareid of CBS News saying just before one of the early Apollo launches "We have to remember, what these men are sitting atop is really just the biggest bomb ever built. We just hope it fires off in the manner planned."

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > NASA Annouces May 27 Return to Space from US
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.