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Bowling Green, KY

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Posted: 05/25/20 05:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The American Chestnut was not killed by a chemical. Back to the topic please. [emoticon]

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 05/25/20 05:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

narcodog wrote:

Tell me when was the last time you saw an American Chestnut?
every year when we visit a sheep/cattle farm in central VA. They planted resistant American chestnuts many years ago.

I recall the elm lined streets in the Chicago suburbs from my childhood. We planted resistant elms at our previous gone; we will eventually plant resistant elms on our current farm.

down home

south

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Posted: 05/26/20 11:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have an American Chestnut alive and well Lots of Chestnut trees spring up from the roots around the bases of long cut down giants along the ridge. And on down the ridge line are several live American Chestnuts.
At least I hope the one in our woods is still alive. Someone cut a giant branch or whole tree and came down our road and dropped at the end of our drive in 2013. They may have cut it down. I wish i had been there when he dropped it off.
There is a bug attacking walnuts in the counties east of us in Tn and it hasn't made it here yet. Half the woods are walnut trees.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 05/26/20 01:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

down home wrote:


There is a bug attacking walnuts in the counties east of us in Tn and it hasn't made it here yet. Half the woods are walnut trees.


I have a whole forest of the fabled hard to find "Black Walnut" trees I would love to sell.. Some folks believe a Black walnut tree is rare and expensive..

I've got a monster BW towering well over 100 ft tall..

One of these days it WILL have a "meeting" with my chain saw and wood burner.. Hate those blasted baseball sized nuts, sure beat the heck out of my mower deck, can't walk near the tree without stepping/tripping on them and they make one heck of a stain on shoes/clothing/hands..

Not to mention BW trees also spreads out a natural herbicide chemical called Juglone from its roots, leaves and even the fruit husks which kills other trees/vegetation off.. Can't put a garden in there, have tried, pretty much nothing grows near that stand of BWs other than BWs..

BLACK WALNUT TREE

Wished I could find a person willing to part with a million for it??

See adds on CL all the time for BW trees they are trying to get top dollar out of them..

down home

south

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Posted: 05/26/20 10:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't remember the prices and the one that fell at our last home, neighbors got it and made mantles and tables from it.
Good figured wood brings lots of money especially if it is a peeler with no knots for veneer. The roots can bring really big prices.
The nuts can easily be picked up with a hand tool you roll over them like a cage. Our Snapper zero turn wit high lift blades set at about 3 1/2 inches would make short work of the green to rotting husks on the walnuts leaving the black nut itself. We get a lot of rain and we are more temperate rain forest than anything else now so the husks just disappear into the grass and soils in a month or so. Of course the yard is large. it is a pain to try to walk on ground covered with fresh walnuts in the hulls and Sycamore Balls ,and locust balls. Dad hated the chestnuts which were everywhere when he was young. The spiked hulls and such. I am thinking of getting someone to retrieve some of the chestnuts, and plant in pots for eventual transfer to the field/lawn out front. If you hav a hundred foot walnut then you have some serious good looking crotch wood up high, and at least three 8'-10' peeler logs with no knots, I think. and the roots. If you have a Arborist or a Mill that specializes in Walnut pecan and such I would seriously have them look at it before I would burn it. Walnut is terrible wood in the fireplace.
I am not able but if i can find a couple of teenagers, I have the saws etc to cut some wood for benches and picnic tables and such out of oaks, walnuts and others that are down but sound.

Bill1374

northern New York

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Posted: 05/31/20 04:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have done gun stock work since the late 60s. While most of my work was with cherry and curly maple, walnut and figured walnut is awesome. Because arthur came to visit my knuckles, I have pretty much stopped working. That said, I do have a couple of pieces of stump walnut left. The color and figure in this wood is beautiful. At woodworkers shows, I usually wind up drooling over the walnut that's available. Wish I could still work with it. Treasure the walnuts that you have as they are getting tough to find.


KZ Montego Bay in Florida
Rockwood lite up north
2016 HD Street Glide, 12 Fatboy for cruisin

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Bowling Green, KY

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Posted: 05/31/20 05:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, we need to protect our trees. Walnut is so plentiful in our area and neighboring states it is used as firewood; not an exaggeration. The lumber companies around here that buy, kiln dry, and export walnut are not buying right now as there is no demand; sad but true. This is not necessarily true for the rare veneer size trees but is for the 'run of the mill walnut trees'.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 06/01/20 02:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Moderator wrote:

Yes, we need to protect our trees. Walnut is so plentiful in our area and neighboring states it is used as firewood; not an exaggeration. The lumber companies around here that buy, kiln dry, and export walnut are not buying right now as there is no demand; sad but true. This is not necessarily true for the rare veneer size trees but is for the 'run of the mill walnut trees'.


"Lumber companies" do not buy "Yard trees" (trees around a homeowners house), they buy "lots" of known good lumber on wooded lots that have less chance of something metal embedded.

Sawmills typically will not accept "yard trees".

Portable sawmill sawyer guys MIGHT be willing to make lumber out of "yard trees" but typically will charge $50-$100 for every bandsaw blade ruined by metal objects embedded in the wood.. This often gets pretty pricey after you take out more than 1 or two blades.

"Yard trees" typically WILL have hard metal things like nails, spikes, screws, bolts, lag bolts, fencing wire, entire metal fence posts and any other metal thing that the tree grows around..

Portable sawyers typically will refuse to cut the first 10 ft closest to the ground especially for this reason. Really a shame since that is the thickest and gives the most board foot but I cannot blame them..

I have run into bunches of nails, screws and barbed wire from some of the trees on my property with my chainsaws, makes a mess of the chain and each time you jab a saw into a tree boardering a property line you do have a good chance of this happening.

As far as selling a "yard tree" for lumber goes, yeah, everyone WANTS KILN DRIED wood, don't have a kiln to dry it, your precious yard lumber isn't worth a plug nickel.

True story, my Brother had somewhere over 4K board feet of prime VT Maple wood that he had dropped and had cut into boards.. He was planning to build all new kitchen cabinets, doors and even make trim for his 100+ yr old VT farm house.. Sadly he passed before tackling that project.. My SIL tried to no avail could get a cabinet maker WILLING to use that wood even though it had been properly stickered and had well dried in his attic for 4 yrs!

She ended up TRADING the entire 4K board ft lot of Maple to someone else who HAD a SMALL AMOUNT of kiln dried Maple, just enough to get the kitchen cabinets made.

I have about 1K board ft of very pretty VT grown pine my Brother had given me a yr before he passed so I could use for Trim work in my house leftover.. Sort of like having that wood as trim as a reminder of his kindness..

On edit..

Wanted to include a neat project I did with some of the overgrown trees on my property..

[image]

Made that fake fireplace surround out of some of the butt ends that a portable sawyer di not want to run through his mill.. I hand slabbed the wood with a 1990s McCullough chain saw..

Pretty wood, nice grain, hard as heck.. That wood air dried in my basement for well over 8yrs before I got around to that..

Houses a 500 watt electric heater to help warm up a cool living room space.

* This post was edited 06/01/20 02:36pm by Gdetrailer *

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Bowling Green, KY

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Posted: 06/01/20 03:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

"Lumber companies" do not buy "Yard trees" (trees around a homeowners house), they buy "lots" of known good lumber on wooded lots that have less chance of something metal embedded.



I made no mention of, and was not referring to, 'yard trees'. I am speaking of all the walnut found in forests and on multiple farms in Ky, Tn, and other states. It is fairly abundant. Right now there simply is not a market local, or foreign, for walnut. It may pick up later; lumber is a very fluid market. I have a friend that has multiple drive in kilns, be buys locally and surrounding states and exports world wide by the container load. When the market picks up he will be able to move the full storage yards of walnut, oak, cedar, and maple; but not right now.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 06/01/20 07:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Moderator wrote:

Quote:

"Lumber companies" do not buy "Yard trees" (trees around a homeowners house), they buy "lots" of known good lumber on wooded lots that have less chance of something metal embedded.



I made no mention of, and was not referring to, 'yard trees'. I am speaking of all the walnut found in forests and on multiple farms in Ky, Tn, and other states. It is fairly abundant. Right now there simply is not a market local, or foreign, for walnut. It may pick up later; lumber is a very fluid market. I have a friend that has multiple drive in kilns, be buys locally and surrounding states and exports world wide by the container load. When the market picks up he will be able to move the full storage yards of walnut, oak, cedar, and maple; but not right now.


Understandable.

The problem is the average guy on the street often misunderstands there is a difference in value of a tree in their backyard and a grove of trees unmolested by nails and other objects. These are the folks that often post their backyard Oak, Walnut, Cherry, Maple for out of this world pricing on CL..

The conversation here can easily mistaken by the average guy on the street because there was no context.. Your talking more in the lines of Commercial tree development, guy on the street is thinking, wow, I can cash in on that big tree in my backyard.

The BW tree grove I have is in reality worth more as firewood rather than lumber quality prices. Burns pretty good and around here nobody will buy it from a backyard.

Although the last time I sawed BW, my allergies did not appreciate the high Tannin content contained in it.. Kind of puts me off from dropping a few of the oversized ones in my backyard that have the potential of reaching out to my house or garage. Some wood workers often have allergic reactions to BW dust..

I enjoy making things out of wood and often from leftover pieces the sawyer would not touch.. Slabbed out some nice Oak last Summer from a friends place, he had a backyard Oak against his home dropped and had me cut some lengths so he could have some lumber cut out of it.. The leftovers I could keep for firewood.. I kept a couple parts of the butt that was over 36" across and made some Oak slabs for future wood projects.

He also has me go in a clean up after some select cuts he has done on his 160 acres every few years, typically has them do select cuts 40 acres at time so not a clear cut, keeps me in fire wood and helps to give new growth a fighting chance.. Good woodlot management.

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