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 > gps which one is best,second best

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mikestock

Vestavia Hills, AL, USA

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Posted: 06/16/20 06:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I didn't necessarily use my GPS on my cell phone when I'm well aware of the route I will be taking.

My last trip through Knoxville, TN, I learned my lesson. I noticed that about 70% of the traffic exited the interstate, toward Maryville, just south of Knoxville. I didn't think much about it and kept going. The traffic came to a sudden halt and the trip through Knoxville took about 2-1/2 hours. There was a major accident during early rush hour and the traffic that had exited went through Maryville probably saved at least 1-1/2 hour. I now use the Google or Waze mapping, even when I know the route like the back of my hand.

Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 06/17/20 05:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^^^^^^^^^^^^X2^^^^^^^^^^^


What I post is my 2 cents and nothing more. Please don't read anything into my post that's not there. If you disagree, that's OK.
Can't we all just get along?

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 06/17/20 11:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bill.Satellite wrote:

Not sure why folks keep talking about not using a cell phone as a GPS due to concerns over losing mapping with no cell service.
A) If you know you are headed for such an extremely remote area where you will not have service for hours, you can download the maps before you leave on the trip.
B) Google Maps downloads a good portion of your trip as soon as you begin the trip and continues to do so as you travel. The phone always has many many miles ahead of you already downloaded so loss of cell signal for a little while is of no concern. If you are traveling the Interstate highway system it's unlikely you would ever be without a signal for any longer than it takes to top the hill ahead.
C) Using the phone gives you the only truly LIVE traffic info even out in the middle of nowhere as the phone collects speed information along your route and can warn you of major traffic issues giving you time to find and alternate route, take a break or just live with it knowing how far ahead the back up ends.
Google can now also let you know where there are lane closures, speed traps and other user reported issues. None of this is available via a stand alone GPS unless you tie it to your cell phone and that pretty much kills the argument of GPS and loss of cellular.
Lastly, while any GPS can have incorrect mapping information, the MOST up-to-date maps are available on Google Maps and WAZE. They can be be updated in real time on short notice like years long construction projects. These never show up on a Garmin type device but keep you on track with phone apps.


Or ..... the next time you replace your mobile phone you can buy one with a large enough internal storage capacity so as to just-in-case hold vast area maps all the time. That can make it just like the dedicated navigator units that internally store - for instance - all of North America. Both my Garmin navigator unit and phone internally hold all of North America.

My phone even holds Aerial Imagery, Quad Sheet, Topo, Digital Atlas, and Open Street maps of most of North America ... and I can update these as often as I need, and any/all of these map types can be overlaid on top of each other if desired. These map databases use the internal GPS capability - so no cell tower access is required.


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cleo43

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Posted: 06/17/20 01:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:



My phone even holds Aerial Imagery, Quad Sheet, Topo, Digital Atlas, and Open Street maps of most of North America ... and I can update these as often as I need, and any/all of these map types can be overlaid on top of each other if desired. These map databases use the internal GPS capability - so no cell tower access is required.

You miss his point about traffic jams in real time.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 06/17/20 03:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cleo43 wrote:

Quote:



My phone even holds Aerial Imagery, Quad Sheet, Topo, Digital Atlas, and Open Street maps of most of North America ... and I can update these as often as I need, and any/all of these map types can be overlaid on top of each other if desired. These map databases use the internal GPS capability - so no cell tower access is required.

You miss his point about traffic jams in real time.


Right you are!

It would be extremely rare to encounter traffic jams in places where there isn't any cellular system service.

djsamuel

Central Florida

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Posted: 06/18/20 01:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mikestock wrote:

I didn't necessarily use my GPS on my cell phone when I'm well aware of the route I will be taking.

My last trip through Knoxville, TN, I learned my lesson. I noticed that about 70% of the traffic exited the interstate, toward Maryville, just south of Knoxville. I didn't think much about it and kept going. The traffic came to a sudden halt and the trip through Knoxville took about 2-1/2 hours. There was a major accident during early rush hour and the traffic that had exited went through Maryville probably saved at least 1-1/2 hour. I now use the Google or Waze mapping, even when I know the route like the back of my hand.


This is an important point. The Garmin I use has traffic and it works very well. However, when I was using my old GPS I never thought about that!


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IsssomSkive

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Posted: 06/25/20 03:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I also use Garmin 760, it does the job for me.


..

Kober

Arizona

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Posted: 08/14/20 10:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Can Google Maps be configured to warn of low bridges and other RV hazards like switchbacks and steep grades?


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Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 08/14/20 06:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kober wrote:

Can Google Maps be configured to warn of low bridges and other RV hazards like switchbacks and steep grades?

No. If you are hoping to make travel plans blindly, no matter what you use will eventually let you down. You should know your route ahead of time and use the GPS to warn you of upcoming turns and traffic issues ahead.

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