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 > Climbing steep grades...

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Mrgunguy

Asheville, NC

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Posted: 06/16/20 02:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ReneeG wrote:

I'm not a Class A owner, but on more than one occasion, in our travels, we've seen the toad following the motor home by the other driver, up mountain passes.


That’s a great idea and one that I had considered but would rather not do if I can help it. My wife can’t drive a stick and she would rather not drive the coach when she has to think about what she’s doing. She likes it flat and straight, LOL! But she’s a trooper and will do what’s needed if required.

pigman1

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Posted: 06/16/20 03:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just another thought. If you have a PAC or Jake break, be sure you use them going down. General guidance is same gear going down as going up, but of course, if you've never driven the road, that's a bit difficult. However, same general procedures going down as going up. Downshift to what you think might be right and slow down to keep from overturning the engine. After you down shift, if the coach is slowing on the hill, feed it a bit of gas as long as RPM's stay in a reasonable range. If not, up shift one and start the procedure over again. If you are accelerating as you start down, use the service brake to slow down below the first speed you selected and see what RPM/speed does. If speed starts up again, downshift a gear, slow down and start the process over again. This sounds complicated but as you gain experience, you'll be able to guess the necessary RPM/speed closer and closer. Just know that this is a continuous process that never ends due to traffic, road grade changes and other conditions vary, but you'll find it easier as you gain practice. After a while you'll find yourself doing these things without conscious thought and then you'll find mountain driving can actually be fun. Besides, the views are great.


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STBRetired

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Posted: 06/16/20 03:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My MH normally runs at about 195 on the flats and will get up to about 220 when climbing grades. That is pretty normal and not much to worry about. 235 is a bit high, but if it comes right back down if you slow your assent or reach the top, I don't see it as much of a problem. that is assuming that those temps are while towing your Jeep. If that is without a tow, you will have issues when you add 4000 pounds of dead weight behind you. If your trans cooler is part of the radiator, you should install a separate cooler so that the trans is not pushing heat into your engine coolant. Would be better for the trans as well. My rig has separate trans and oil coolers mounted in front of the A/C condenser.


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Desert Captain

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Posted: 06/16/20 04:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You will find Yellowstone a great deal higher than 5,000'... More like 6,800' to 8,500'{ I just spent a week there}. You should be a lot more worried about your transmission fluid temps than the engine coolant temperatures. Hopefully you have a gauge that displays trans temp {like a Scan Gauge} and if not you NEED one!

Your engine/transmission coolant temps should never exceed about 225 and then only in extreme heat and under a heavy load. So long as the temps cool back down as soon as the load is removed you should be fine. Your trans temps will be 12 - 20 degrees higher than they should be {and not in a good way} unless you religiously utilize your Tow Haul function. A Scan Gauge will demonstrate this quite clearly and if you are not using TH your are slowly but surely cooking your transmission {needlessly}.

We are In St George, Utah wrapping up a three week trip that will come in at around 4,000+ miles. Climbing the 8, 9 and even 10,000' passes we have encountered the coolant rarely saw 212 and the trans 206 and I am fully loaded and towing a 2,200# 10' X 6 ' {8' tall} cargo trailer with my 2012 E-350 V-10 24' Class C {I have my Indian Springfield - 875# and some misc gear in the trailer}.

I have had this rig for nearly 7 years with 62,000 miles on it and live in southern Arizona RVing year round the whole time. As soon as I bought the coach {used with just 6,208 miles on it} I changed out the oil, trans fluid and differential for full synthetic and yes, it helps a lot!

Keep good fluids and the temps in the proper range and your 6L or my 6.8 V-10 will last longer than we will.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

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drmopar

Discovery Bay

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Posted: 06/16/20 04:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you want to tow, add separate coolers. My dealership had the CHP account with those older Mopars with the 440's. They had Trans coolers, Engine oil coolers, Power steering coolers and a Max cooling package. These would never overheat going up a grade at 120mph. In your case make sure to switch off the A/C when going uphill. You don't need the additional heat from the A/C condenser. Add a trans cooler and disconnect if part of the engine radiator is used for trans cooling. Worst case, I helped a guy with a overheat issue. The radiator was too small to handle the heat, so we used an old windshield washer tank and pump to direct water on the front of the radiator when getting hot, old school but it works.

Mrgunguy

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Posted: 06/16/20 04:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks guys, this is all very helpful. What it tells me is that I should bring it back to my mechanic and see if there’s anything that he can do, equipment-wise. The reason I am thinking this way is because this MH routinely goes above 225 when going up hills, and that’s when it’s empty. No water, gear, toad or wife. The heat seems to always be something I have my eye on and it’s disconcerting. If the mechanic can install a trans cooler and maybe double check the whole cooling system to see if he can make it more efficient/effective, that might make the difference.

Lwiddis

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Posted: 06/16/20 05:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Five thousand feet elevation? Wow serious IMO. lol

Be ready for 10,000 in the Eastern Sierra and over 12,000 in Rocky Mountain NP.


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wolfe10

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Posted: 06/16/20 05:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WHAT goes above 225 degrees F? Coolant? Transmission?

What effect does going to a lower gear and less than WOT do for temperature?


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time2roll

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Posted: 06/16/20 05:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well whatever speed, you should not have to use just 30% to 50% of the power to go slow and keep from boiling over. There really is something wrong if this is the case. If this has been going on since the last cooling service consider a different shop. Need someone that can find the issue and repair. Anybody can swap most of the coolant, say they changed the thermostat and checked the fan and send you down the road. You need someone to really get in there and fix it.

240-250 should be top of normal with 260-280 is boil over range. I assume it should run 200-210 max on the flats at 65 mph.


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BarabooBob

Baraboo, WI

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Posted: 06/16/20 06:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I drove a Toyota bases Class C over 60,000 miles including up the west side of the Bighorn Mtns on 14A, the Beartooth Hoghway, Logan Pass, Independence Pass, Trail Ridge Road and almost every high elevation pass in the Rockies. My solution to running hot was to spin that little 22Re (115 horse engine w/6,000 pound coach) I frequently ran 4500 to 5000 rpms in second gear doing 45 mph. The engine never got hot. The tranny never got hot. I had an oversized radiator and an extra tranny cooler.
Even with you Chevy based Class C, don't be afraid of running the engine faster. Install proper gauges including engine temp, tranny temp, & tach. Don't worry about how fast you are going, shift down before anything gets hot and spool that motor up. Drive with the tach and temp gauges. You will still get there, just a bit slower without damaging your rig. Get used to the sound of your Vortex at higher rpms, it really is a sweet sound.


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