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 > ScanGauge vs UltraGauge

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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 06/19/20 01:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

I would never own a motorhome or truck without a Scan Gauge. I've had mine for 11 years, bought it for my 5.4L V-8 F-150 when I was towing a 22' TT. When I bought the Class C I just reprogrammed it for the 6.8L V-10 and have not looked back. The install was all of about 4 minutes, two small pieces of velcro and a wire tie for the excess coil behind the dash. It just does not get much simpler than that.

For the record I always run with average and real time mpg's displayed along with transmission fluid {X Gauge function} and coolant temp. The first trip I took with the SC I got 10 percent better mileage just by watching the displays and playing the game of trying to keep my real time mileage higher than the average. I figure I got my $139 back in about 6 months just on fuel savings.

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D.C. - I just watch the good old (analog??, teehee) Ford dash guage for engine temperature - and of course it's never moved since I've owned our E450 Class C. What kind of engine and transmission temperatures have you seen when climbing grades and pulling your trailer in hot summer temperatures?

P.S. #1 The 5R110 transmission on our 2005 E450 mysteriously failed at around 60K miles ... and I wonder if it was because of it running too hot at times through the years when going up grades with the transmissioon NOT in Tow Haul mode ... hence maybe excessive clutch slippage and the consequent generated heat inside the tranny.

P.S. #2 Now I keep Tow Haul mode engaged almost all of the time to maybe help reduce clutch slippage heat on grades.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

Desert Captain

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Posted: 06/19/20 02:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Phil, As I am sure you know Ford gauges are notorious for being glorified idiot lights but fortunately there is nothing deficient about the ECM. By tapping into it through the OBD port the Scan Gauge gives me all I need and much more.

This last trip was typical albeit a tad longer than most at 4,150 miles. Most of it was either deep in the Rockies or cruising down the interstates at 65 - 70 and the usual trans fluid temps were 186 unless I was climbing a lot and then it would get as high as 212 - 216. I saw 225 once climbing up out of Panamint Springs in Death Valley in September with temps at 110 and that was towing the Harley

Coolant temps typically sit around 198 but will climb to 210 -216 on extreme grades or if the desert heat is cranking. No harm or foul as they both drop like a stone as soon I reach the summit or take my foot out of it.

Towing the Indian in my Cargo trailer {bike and trailer weigh 2,200#} this trip we averaged 9 mpg. Saw higher {long downhills} and lower {driving into 35 gusting to 50 mph winds right on the nose for hours at a time}. I can't say enough good things about that V-10... it is a beast that has never even flinched.

If I had to guess I would say your previous lack of religious use of Tow Haul contributed to the shortened working life of your original trans which is pure conjecture on my part{not to mention that your hobby is to fill the rig up with lots of rocks and go where few would follow}.

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carringb

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Posted: 06/19/20 03:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I like to run actual coolant temps too. The factory gauge is buffered, so it reads points dead center between about 170-240 ish. By the time the gauge shoots up, it might be too late, if you're not a spot you can immediately pull over.

If I see my temps go above 220F and climbing, I'll either ease up a little, or switch off the A/C. Or at least the rear a/c since that's a bigger heat load in my case. But that's VERY rare. Really only happens when it's above 100F and after about 10 minutes of WOT climbing. If the engine coolant temp gets too hot, then the in-tank transmission cooler won't be adding much cooling anymore, and that's when the trans temps shoot up.

But more important, it'll give you early warning of a cooling system problem, before it becomes a big problem. Last summer, I had an issue with my engine temps hitting 240F before the T-stat would open. Never would have known it was starting to stick, if I couldn't see actual temps on the UltraGauge.


Bryan

2000 Ford E450 V10 VAN! 450,000+ miles
2014 ORV really big trailer
2015 Ford Focus ST


bobndot

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Posted: 06/19/20 04:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On those temp readings are most of you running stock cooling systems or have you added an extra external cooler, either oil or trans. ?

Desert Captain

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Posted: 06/19/20 06:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bobndot wrote:

On those temp readings are most of you running stock cooling systems or have you added an extra external cooler, either oil or trans. ?



Any truck with the factory tow package should come with a transmission cooler standard. It's the same for motorhomes, I have yet to see one without a dedicated trans cooler. After doing some research I am considering replacing my fan clutch with a high performance aftermarket model. Mine works fine but is 8+ years old and there are a lot of good reports out there on this upgrade for not a lot of money.

Living in southern Arizona {the forecast is for triple digits and zero precipitation for the next ten days... Arrrg!} I take the heat seriously. I flush/replace my coolant every 2 - 3 years and keep a close eye on the entire cooling system {hoses, clamps etc.}. I think running full synthetic oil {trans fluid and differential} is a good idea as well and like chicken soup, "It might not help but it couldn't hurt..."

Always carry lots of water and stay hydrated.

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bobndot

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Posted: 06/19/20 09:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Triple digits for 10 days. I know its bad, we have a few friends living in and around Phoenix. I would think the pavement would burn a dogs paws.

I know my 2017 Ford E450 has a tranny cooler. I have to check to see if my 2017 Fords trans cooler is internal or external.


My Scangauge 2 is due to arrive tomorrow. I think I have to program it to monitor the trans temp on a 2017 v10 Wish me luck !

carringb

Corvallis, OR

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Posted: 06/20/20 08:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bobndot wrote:

On those temp readings are most of you running stock cooling systems or have you added an extra external cooler, either oil or trans. ?


In my case, I upgraded the stock external cooler to a Tru-Cool max, because my grill guard changed airflow enough to make the trans temps higher, and I'm running up to 25,000 combined. The stock cooler should be sufficient for the 22,000 rated GCWR.

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