Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: General RVing Issues: Ham radios
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Ham radios

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Next
down home

south

Senior Member

Joined: 06/01/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/15/20 05:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One or twice the subject has come up but the FRS and the other channels are not a great idea.
When out on the road in the middle of nowhere and the cells don't work and the CBs, now rare, and you don't have 100 watt linear and twin 10 ft antennas on one what to do?
I have considered 2 meter handhelds and find a few at modest prices.....and lots of comments..and personal experience with cheap printed (not the term I want) switches.....
So is 2 meter an answer or 10 meter or in Canada marine radios not just on the water.
So you guys with the ham radios I want a long range 2 way radios, the repeater situation, has had some negative comments too, so no more than a couple hundred dollars for two radios that more than just I would use that can reach otu there through woods and over mountains?
And how about a radio to our home based landlines or cells?

ReneeG

Meridian, Idaho

Senior Member

Joined: 07/13/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/15/20 05:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One of our future bucket list trips is the Magruder Road in northern Idaho. Hubby had thought of getting his Ham radio license in order to communicate up there if need, but there are these radios that work off the satellites and can communicate to cell phones by text for a month by month fee. One is made by Garmin. No license required and you would only need one.


2011 Bighorn 3055RL
2011 F350 DRW 6.7L 4x4 Diesel Lariat and Hensley BD3
1992 Jeep ZJ and 1978 Coleman Concord Pop-Up for remote camping
Dave & Renee plus (Champ, Molly, Paris, Missy, and Maggie in spirit), Mica and Mabel, both Rat Terriers!


rdhetrick

Texas

Full Member

Joined: 08/30/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/15/20 05:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As a ham myself, I can give you my experience...

If you're looking to communicate with someone else along with you, they work great, much better than FRS.

However, if you're wanting it for "emergency" communications with the outside world if you don't have cell signal, I don't think it's effective. There just isn't enough people "listening" out there. Sure, some areas are active, but the vast majority of space is pretty dead. Even on the repeaters, I find most places to be quiet.

For example, I recently made a trip out west from Dallas, TX to southern CA, AZ, and NM. Over the course of that 4 week trip, I got ZERO responses on the 2M calling frequencey. While driving, I'd call out every hour or so. Usually when I reached a campground, I'd try once.

Bottom line, I don't consider it a reliable mode of communication for a personal emergency.

I do a lot of hiking, and I'm thinking hard about getting a PLB for a true emergency.

AA5RV


Rob
2006 Mandalay 40E Full Time
2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

rk911

DuPage County

Senior Member

Joined: 05/30/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 07/15/20 05:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

if you’re looking to call for help a hand held radio...on any band (ham, marine, GMRS, business band) the range of the radio without using a repeater will be very, very short. using a properly installed externally mounted antenna along with a power amplifier will extend that range but that will be more than your $ budget.

a ham HF transceiver with a good antenna will let you talk around the country or the world. no linear needed but, again, more $ than you want to spend.

a mobile 2-meter radio with the aforementioned properly installed externally mounted antenna along with a power amplifier will give you better range but, again, more $.

everything ham, GMRS, business band requires an FCC-issued license. for true
emergency use here is no magic bullet.


Rich
Ham Radio, Sport Pilot
_________________________________
2016 Itasca Suncruiser 38Q
'46 Willys CJ2A
'03 Jeep Wrangler TJ
'10 Jeep Liberty KK

& MaggieThe Wonder Beagle

Reisender

NA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/09/2018

View Profile


Online
Posted: 07/15/20 06:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A 2 meter or 70 cm handheld will get you about 3 times the distance if it is a 5 watt unit. If you have an external antenna and the other party you are talking to has as well you can do much longer range, 15 or 20 kilometers etc, especially if it is mounted mobile unit as they tend to be 40 watt ish units. Of course to do all this you need to take a course and get your ticket. Or at least write the exam if you have home studied.

RobWNY

Jamestown, NY

Senior Member

Joined: 02/28/2014

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/15/20 06:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think the coolest part of having a Ham Radio License is you can talk with the Astronauts on the International Space Station. The ISS radio transmits signals at 145.80 MHz and receives signals at either 144.49 or 145.20 MHz, depending on its orbital location.


2020 Silverado 2500HD LT, CC, 4X4 6.6 Duramax
2021 Grand Design Reflection 311BHS

You can't put a porcupine in a barn, set it on fire, and expect to make licorice.


rk911

DuPage County

Senior Member

Joined: 05/30/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 07/15/20 06:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

A 2 meter or 70 cm handheld will get you about 3 times the distance if it is a 5 watt unit. If you have an external antenna and the other party you are talking to has as well you can do much longer range, 15 or 20 kilometers etc, especially if it is mounted mobile unit as they tend to be 40 watt ish units. Of course to do all this you need to take a course and get your ticket. Or at least write the exam if you have home studied.


possibly, under ideal conditions. not so much from a campsite in the forest or in a mountainous valley. in a flat LTVA or on top of a hill extended range is possible. but someone has to be listening.

Ed_Gee

Central Oregon coast

Senior Member

Joined: 01/14/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/15/20 07:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe a quality VHF (2M) radio with good properly installed antenna will provide substantial communications capability around most of the continent. We planned on relying on 2M for our emergency communications needs on our journey up British Columbia and even through the Yukon Territory and into Alaska before COVID hit..... It would have had far Better coverage than cell phones. Another option is one of the two satellite system texting options with appropriate plan. As a bit of a Prepper, I keep a Garmin Inreach device on hand with a monthly plan.


Ed - on the Central Oregon coast
2018 Winnebago Fuse 23A
Scion xA toad

lampooner

South Carolina

Senior Member

Joined: 06/03/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/16/20 04:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have been a HAM sine 1958. Got my license via a high school ham radio club.
It is a great hobby, i have enjoyed it for years.

I can not, would not, recommend it for guaranteed reliable use in an emergency.
Someone mentioned a satellite phone option. I would recommend looking into that.
It probably would be a great deal more reliable, I feel.

That said Ham radio is a great hobby and backup for emergency situations.


Lampooner

Remember you are only young once,
but you can be immature forever!

wa8yxm

Wherever I happen to park

Senior Member

Joined: 07/04/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/16/20 05:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2 Meters though great where it works is not 100%.. If you are worried about being out in the middle of no where with a blown engine and no cell coverage that's not your best choice.. a Good multi-band HF radio (80-10 or 160-6) might be a better otpion. No the higher numbered (lower frequency) bands you may need more antenna than practical on an RV but for 40 or better 20 to six the antennas get smaller (a full Dipole is 1/2 the wavelength so a 20 meter Dipole is 10 meters or about 33.5 feet so reasonable on many RV's a Quarter wave VERTICAL is half that high

(The frame of the RV is the other half)

Range? Well some Rvers routinely work overseas contacts I routinely work about half the US voice and half the world digital when conditions are decent which right now they are not. but I can still talk to folks. Just not as many.


Home is where I park it.
Kenwood TS-2000 housed in a 2005 Damon Intruder 377


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Ham radios
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in General RVing Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.