Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Yet another tow/weight question...
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 > Yet another tow/weight question...

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SlothHorn

Rowlett, TX

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Posted: 07/20/20 01:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First time poster. I anticipate become a full-fledged member of this site/community as I get started.

Like many, I am confused about my truck's towing capacity. I've read every word of this thread twice. I figure, the best thing might be to put on my own truck's specs and lean on the experts on here for help.

2009 Dodge Ram SLT Quad Cab 2WD 4.7 V8
Gear Ratio 3.55
GVWR 6,700
3,700 front; 3,900 rear
Payload 1,681 - I'm assuming this is my payload as it's on the sticker inside my door.

95% of our travel will be somewhat local and on flat roads; however, we do want to take the occasional cross-country trip. We'll never be in a hurry as we're teachers and anticipate these rare trips to be over a good length of time.

What would be a comfortable dry weight "max" for a travel trailer? Thanks in advance. Ty

Lwiddis

South of Lone Pine, California

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A wet/loaded 7000 pound TT with WDH hitch will subtract at least 1000 pounds from your payload. If you carry only a few items in the truck that would be your max IMO.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watt solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL flag pole. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet-11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


djsamuel

Central Florida

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SlothHorn wrote:

First time poster. I anticipate become a full-fledged member of this site/community as I get started.

Like many, I am confused about my truck's towing capacity. I've read every word of this thread twice. I figure, the best thing might be to put on my own truck's specs and lean on the experts on here for help.

2009 Dodge Ram SLT Quad Cab 2WD 4.7 V8
Gear Ratio 3.55
GVWR 6,700
3,700 front; 3,900 rear
Payload 1,681 - I'm assuming this is my payload as it's on the sticker inside my door.

95% of our travel will be somewhat local and on flat roads; however, we do want to take the occasional cross-country trip. We'll never be in a hurry as we're teachers and anticipate these rare trips to be over a good length of time.

What would be a comfortable dry weight "max" for a travel trailer? Thanks in advance. Ty

I have the identical truck; same engine, gear ratio, model and quad cab as well (2WD). We tow a 24' trailer all over the country with that truck and it's been great; very stable, reliable, and not a white knuckle experience at all. However, if I was towing a much larger trailer, I would be looking at a bigger truck.

What size trailer do you plan to be towing? Figure 12% tongue weight and subtract that from the payload. That would be how much you can put in the truck (including people). Don't use the dry weight for your calculations. You want to use the GVWR so you can assume worst case.


Picture of Our Trailer

Camplite 21BHS


RollTideCamp

Tuscaloosa

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Check out this calculator, it is pretty good. You will want to factor that length and height will play a big part in how comfortable it tows as well, but its a great start.

https://www.keepyourdaydream.com/payload/

Mickeyfan0805

SE Wisconsin

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's really hard to judge - as there are a lot of factors still at play. Many will try to give rules of thumb (such as the 'use GVWR' note above), but those only go so far in some cases (if a trailer has 3k of cargo capacity, going by GVWR is probably overkill). So, here's the best quick overview I could suggest.

First, your payload is probably less than 1,681 - as that was the payload when the truck left the assembly line. Anything else added (bedliner, cover, mud flaps, bumper steps, etc.) all come off of that number. You can judge for yourself, or go to a scale to know for sure. I'll use 1,650 to start. So...

1,650:
-subtract driver and passenger weight (we'll say 400 for this example, you adjust).
-Subtract weight of the WD hitch (app. 100 pounds)
-Subtract weight of all gear, snacks, games, beverages in the cab (we'll say 50 pounds)
-Subtract tools, bikes, wood, grills, etc. in the bed (we'll say 100 pounds).

This would leave you with 1,000 pounds available for tongue weight. Assuming your hitch is rated to handle that tongue weight, you could handle somewhere around 7,500 pounds LOADED. I would suggest, based on that, you'd need to be looking at something under 6,500 pounds dry, if not closer to 6,000 even.

Obviously, you need to adjust the math based on your own family and configuration. We have 1,850 pounds of true payload available in our F150 (200 more than you), I keep the bed completely empty, and I still run right up against our GVWR with a trailer that is 8,000 pounds wet!

wanderingaimlessly

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Payload is the limiting factor. You have 1681 available.
Deduct 100 lbs for weight dist hitch.
Deduct _________ pounds for passengers
Deduct ________pounds for truck cargo (generator, tools, etc)
How much available cargo cap do you have left?

Multiply that number times 9 and you will be ballpark to your max trailer weight.

1681
-100
-???
-???
=----------- x 9 = Trailer max weight

kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 07/20/20 03:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Think you'll be fine as long as you understand the payload limitations which can also be managed somewhat by placing items in trailer instead of truck.

Will also add that after owning 4 trailers in the 24-30ft range, each one weighed much closer to the trailers GVWR vs it's dry weight or UVW.....hence the reason many advise to disregard the latter.

SlothHorn

Rowlett, TX

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Posted: 07/20/20 05:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks so much for all the info.
1. The two we're looking at have dry weights of 4,883 and 5,120.
2. I'm sure most newbies say this, but, we don't anticipate having too much added weight to the calculations above. Family is less than 500 total. We're not planning on taking anything more than the usual cooler, food, clothes, dishes, etc... We may take our bicycles as well.

Looks as if the math is ok according to the info supplied in all your posts. I look forward to adding to this forum on the help-side in the future.

kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 07/20/20 06:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SlothHorn wrote:

Thanks so much for all the info.
1. The two we're looking at have dry weights of 4,883 and 5,120.
2. I'm sure most newbies say this, but, we don't anticipate having too much added weight to the calculations above.


Perhaps your not quite understanding dry weight. This weight does not include optional equipment added, propane tanks, batteries, any fluids......it's just a striped weight off the end of the conveyor belt.

EXAMPLE:
Our current trailer has a dry weight of 6120lbs and a GVWR OF 7740LBS......OUR trailer weighed in at 7492 ready to camp.

Hope this helps.

Mickeyfan0805

SE Wisconsin

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Posted: 07/20/20 06:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SlothHorn wrote:

Thanks so much for all the info.
1. The two we're looking at have dry weights of 4,883 and 5,120.
2. I'm sure most newbies say this, but, we don't anticipate having too much added weight to the calculations above. Family is less than 500 total. We're not planning on taking anything more than the usual cooler, food, clothes, dishes, etc... We may take our bicycles as well.

Looks as if the math is ok according to the info supplied in all your posts. I look forward to adding to this forum on the help-side in the future.


I think you should be fine at that weight. The heavier of those trailers could be up to 6,000-6,500 when fully loaded (depending on fluids). At that weight, your tongue weight would likely be in the 800 pound range. Add 500 for your family and 100 for the hitch and you are at 1,400. That still leaves room for bikes or coolers in the bed.

If you aren't familiar with towing take your time to make sure your hitch is set up correctly, and then find a local parking lot to get a sense of turn angles, tail swing, etc. Then go off and have a blast!

Happy camping!

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