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 > Torque Wrench for WD Hitch nylock nuts

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dolfinwriter

El Cajon, CA

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Posted: 10/24/20 04:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think I found a simple solution:
https://www.amazon.com/Neiko-20743A-Digital-Adapter-Foot-Pound/dp/B009GLITFW/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=400%2Bft%2Blb%2Btorque%2Bwrench&qid=1603572222&sr=8-5&th=1

BenK

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Posted: 10/24/20 06:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Think mixing up 3/4" bolt (measured at the shank dia) vs across the hex flats

A 3/4" across the hex flats is a 1/2" bolt...which IIRC, tops out around 160 ft/lbs max torque for a grade 8

A 3/4" bolt (measured at the shank), IIRC, tops out around 380 ft/lbs

Socket sets are sized by the measurement across the square flats


-Ben Picture of my rig
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BenK

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Posted: 10/24/20 06:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A 3/4" bolt will have a hex head with 1.125" across the flats

Therefore, needs a 1 1/8" socket

dolfinwriter

El Cajon, CA

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Posted: 10/24/20 06:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BenK wrote:

A 3/4" bolt will have a hex head with 1.125" across the flats

Therefore, needs a 1 1/8" socket


I think you're right, but they left that out of the list of tools needed. Looks like I need to go check every fastener and make sure exactly what I need and not trust the manual that came with it. That will definitely be a comment in my review of this thing later!

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* This post was last edited 10/25/20 09:14am by dolfinwriter *   View edit history

carringb

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Posted: 10/24/20 07:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You guys are over thinking this.

Just buy the appropriate length breaker bar so your body weight will generate the torque needed.

If you weigh 180 pounds. A 2 foot breaker bar will apply 360 foot pounds.


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K Charles

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Posted: 10/24/20 07:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The OP posted a list of tools and one of them is a 1 and 1/8 in. wrench for the 3/4 in. bolt.





ACZL

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Posted: 10/25/20 07:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ask folks at a Ryder/Penske shop or the like. If all else fails, Snap-On or MAC tools. How about a semi tire service shop as well.


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dolfinwriter

El Cajon, CA

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Posted: 10/25/20 09:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After lining up all the bolts and checking them against the manual and kind of mock-up test fitting, they left off a 1-1/16" socket for the nylock nut on the 3/4" bolt and a 5/8" open end wrench for the square head frame bracket bolts. I could use a Crescent hammer for those, but adjustable wrench isn't listed either.

So thank you to BenK for mentioning the bolt hex head size vs. bolt diameter, because that prompted me to verify everything I need.

The 3/4" bolt hex head is 1-1/8", but the nylock nuts on those bolts are 1-1/16". Those 1-1/16" nylock nuts are the ones that need to be torqued to 380 ft-lbs.

The install instructions leave a bit to be desired. Maybe they're written "correctly" for the way engineers think and talk, but most people putting this together won't be engineers. And if you assume that a 3/4" bolt means both hex head and nylock nuts are 1-1/8", then you'd be wrong.

What amazes me is the most common response I have gotten is to take it to a semi or big rig maintenance facility and bother them to borrow a proper torque wrench for this. Is that really what most people who are doctors, lawyers, cybersecurity professionals, carpenters, electricians, teachers, bankers, police officers... do? I doubt most people even know where to find one.

Probably the second most common is some version of a "calibrated elbow" approach. I don't torque spec every single thing I work on that lists a torque spec, but torque specs exist to ensure that things are properly tightened, but at the same time not OVER-tightened. This seems like something where it is really important to get it right. One of the reviews of this was a user who winged it, and down the road it came loose. He was smart enough to be checking it at intervals, so he caught it and had tools to tighten it. But would it have come loose at all if he'd gotten the torque to spec to begin with?

So I bought a 3/4" breaker bar, a 3.4" torque adapter (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009GLITFW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1), and a 3/4" 6-pt impact rated socket set w/ratchet and extensions. It's costing me about as much as the proper rated torque wrench by itself, but I'll do this right and I'll have some versatile tools for future use.

CA Traveler

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Posted: 10/25/20 10:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's always been my approach to buy the tools as needed and if I break something then it won't happen twice.


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Durb

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Posted: 10/25/20 10:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dolfinwriter wrote:

After lining up all the bolts and checking them against the manual and kind of mock-up test fitting, they left off a 1-1/16" socket for the nylock nut on the 3/4" bolt and a 5/8" open end wrench for the square head frame bracket bolts. I could use a Crescent hammer for those, but adjustable wrench isn't listed either.

So thank you to BenK for mentioning the bolt hex head size vs. bolt diameter, because that prompted me to verify everything I need.

The 3/4" bolt hex head is 1-1/8", but the nylock nuts on those bolts are 1-1/16". Those 1-1/16" nylock nuts are the ones that need to be torqued to 380 ft-lbs.

The install instructions leave a bit to be desired. Maybe they're written "correctly" for the way engineers think and talk, but most people putting this together won't be engineers. And if you assume that a 3/4" bolt means both hex head and nylock nuts are 1-1/8", then you'd be wrong.

What amazes me is the most common response I have gotten is to take it to a semi or big rig maintenance facility and bother them to borrow a proper torque wrench for this. Is that really what most people who are doctors, lawyers, cybersecurity professionals, carpenters, electricians, teachers, bankers, police officers... do? I doubt most people even know where to find one.

Probably the second most common is some version of a "calibrated elbow" approach. I don't torque spec every single thing I work on that lists a torque spec, but torque specs exist to ensure that things are properly tightened, but at the same time not OVER-tightened. This seems like something where it is really important to get it right. One of the reviews of this was a user who winged it, and down the road it came loose. He was smart enough to be checking it at intervals, so he caught it and had tools to tighten it. But would it have come loose at all if he'd gotten the torque to spec to begin with?

So I bought a 3/4" breaker bar, a 3.4" torque adapter (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009GLITFW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1), and a 3/4" 6-pt impact rated socket set w/ratchet and extensions. It's costing me about as much as the proper rated torque wrench by itself, but I'll do this right and I'll have some versatile tools for future use.


Good decision. I hadn't realized digital in-line torque readers had become so inexpensive. They used to be a lot more expensive than a 3/4" torque wrench. Still make sure you support your work to the ground with a floor jack. Your torque reader will read 380 ft-lbs but the energy used to compress the truck's springs will not make it to tighten the fastener and you will be under torqued.

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