Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Which TT has the Best Kitchen and Why?
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 > Which TT has the Best Kitchen and Why?

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kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 12/21/20 01:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Best thing to do is cook up a more formidable tow vehicle as you'll need one to accommodate the type of kitchen 2 chefs would be happy with.

wildtoad

Blythewood, SC

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Posted: 12/21/20 01:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Have you actually been in the 22ft Bambi? Looking at the exterior there is very little if any storage for stuff you wouldn’t want inside. That’s a lot of money to be paying for nostalgia and name. Since you are both chef’s, I have to assume you will want to bring along a lot of cookware, knives, spices, cutting boards. All well and good but all have space requirements.

Take time to figure out what you want to bring along in food stuffs, clothes, towels, cookery, eating stuff (plates, utensils, glassware), electronic equipment including blenders, warmers, countertop items and envision where it all is going to go in whatever size you think you want.

Also, taking a quick look online at the specs for the X5 they tell you the weight of the car, how much it can tow, hitch weight. What I don’t see is the gross combined weight rating (GCWR) which is important to know. If it says the max weight or GVWR of the x5 is 6,000 and it can tow 6,000 that doesn’t mean you can fully load up the X5 and still tow 6,000. Perhaps your owners manual will have this information.

Just my thoughts


Tom Wilds
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BurbMan

Islip, Long Island

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Posted: 12/21/20 02:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good chefs don't need a lot of equipment like us amateurs! We bought a dutch oven for the camper, it came inside once to do holiday duty and has never left....

I think your size/weight expectations are about right for the X5, your issue as you noted will be water. Finding decent size fresh and grey tanks in a smaller trailer is a challenge. If water is accessible but just not at your trailer, get a some collapsible 6-gal water jugs that you can use to refill the trailer tank, and also a blue tote to drain the gray tank into and take to the dump area (or men's room...)

We mitigate a lot of water usage with paper towels and Windex (or other cleaner). Use paper towels to wipe the pots/pans as clean as you can so it doesn't take much water to scrub them. Use paper plates and disposables as much as possible. Use Windex on stove/countertops/etc.

Also don't wash dishes one at a time. wait until the meal is over, use the stopper to fill the sink with hot sudsy water and wash them all at once. Don't rinse them under running water, a quick dip in the suds will rinse them and the suds will run off while air drying on the drainboard.

It's just a matter of getting into a cadence of what works for you. We are going through that now, having downsized from a 34' trailer to a truck camper, and figuring out what to bring in the limited storage we have.


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propchef

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Posted: 12/21/20 02:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BurbMan wrote:

Good chefs don't need a lot of equipment like us amateurs! We bought a dutch oven for the camper, it came inside once to do holiday duty and has never left....

I think your size/weight expectations are about right for the X5, your issue as you noted will be water. Finding decent size fresh and grey tanks in a smaller trailer is a challenge. If water is accessible but just not at your trailer, get a some collapsible 6-gal water jugs that you can use to refill the trailer tank, and also a blue tote to drain the gray tank into and take to the dump area (or men's room...)

We mitigate a lot of water usage with paper towels and Windex (or other cleaner). Use paper towels to wipe the pots/pans as clean as you can so it doesn't take much water to scrub them. Use paper plates and disposables as much as possible. Use Windex on stove/countertops/etc.

Also don't wash dishes one at a time. wait until the meal is over, use the stopper to fill the sink with hot sudsy water and wash them all at once. Don't rinse them under running water, a quick dip in the suds will rinse them and the suds will run off while air drying on the drainboard.

It's just a matter of getting into a cadence of what works for you. We are going through that now, having downsized from a 34' trailer to a truck camper, and figuring out what to bring in the limited storage we have.



edit: I meant to reply to wildtoad, the post above you. Yes, chefs need minimal gear. :-)


Thanks. See the post just above and my other posts. We don't need a lot of stuff, minimal really. Everything will be preplanned and prepped, only finished for mealtime. We'll need a 10" cast iron, tongs, oil, salt and pepper, plates and service ware. Other must-have items are a variety of stainless steel mixing bowls, side towels, spatulas, basic measuring spoons, and my knife roll.

When I was in scouts I learned how to plan, measure, and package my meals and freeze what I needed, and used homemade dry mixes for things like pancakes. Same concept here. Enough storage for food to last 5 days and the very basics to reheat/finish the meals.

I owned and towed a 30" commercial kitchen that was 8800 lbs empty. Loaded for an event is was sometimes pushing 11k. I'm no stranger to towing. And no, I didn't pull that with the X5 lol


Myth: Chefs eat fancy foods. Truth: Most don't. I LOVE Mac and cheese. I find multi-course meals tedious and I avoid them. We eat simple foods, but seek out the best ingredients and use good technique. My chef friends all love greasy burgers and pizza. But GOOD pizza, from a handmade, hand tossed dough and baked in a 900 degree wood oven. THAT'S a pizza. :-)

propchef

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Posted: 12/21/20 02:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

kellem wrote:

Best thing to do is cook up a more formidable tow vehicle as you'll need one to accommodate the type of kitchen 2 chefs would be happy with.


Another myth. :-) I'm most happy in front of my Weber grill.

I'm a minimalist and can always make due. Chef Luz has a collection of gadgets that would make Willams AND Sonoma jealous.


The X5 is paid for and is staying. A larger truck is down the road but not yet.







Kitchens in YOUR (collectively) trailers? Love 'em or hate 'em? Let's hear.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 12/21/20 02:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My kitchen is fine. Not particularly large or any special features. Short on counter space and storage if you compare to a home but is plenty for travel. Sometimes larger just adds more clutter.
Only thing I would change would be to skip the oven. We have used it maybe 3 times in 15 years.


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Sjm9911

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Posted: 12/21/20 04:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok, so , i cook a bit. You will have a small inadequate kitchen in a camper. The stoves are low pressure, i have yet to see one with a good flame. In fact when the ac is on the flame is worse. Lol. Oven is almost the same, but workable. Best bet is to have a good outdoor set up. Good propane grill, griddle and burner. Also invest in a set of aluminum pots that nest. A few good knives, and forget the set of mixing bowles. Well maybe one that serves as a mixing bowl and mesering bowl/ strainer. You can keep the cast iron pan , i bring 2 of them. You will learn to adapt. Dont rip out the microwave just yet. I never use mine at home, ok popcorn only. But in the TT i use it a lot. Make meals and freeze them, pop in the microwave and dinner is ready. Now you can cook at home. I have also transitioned to paper plates for clean up. Sometimes the water conservation is hard! I would figure most of the TT have simmiler kitchens and storage capabilities. You learn to make due with less. Use stones in the oven for even heat. Grill more, cook on the stovetop less. Have fun and good luck with the search.


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Merrykalia

Appalachian (apple at chun) Mtn in the GREAT SW Va

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Posted: 12/21/20 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have owned and cooked in 6 different campers...popup, hybrid, travel trailer, 2 different fifth wheels and now a motorhome.

I could cook up a good meal in all of them...some, just a bit easier. The popup had a tiny fridge and 2 burners. That limited what we could do inside, so I mostly cooked outside under a canopy. The hybrid was a bit more challenging because the stove was directly across from the bathroom door. Again, most of it was done outside.

A trailer is small...no matter how big it is, compared to a residential kitchen, it's small. The use of a burner also heats up the camper quickly, even in cold weather. It also produces lots and lots of steam, which produces condensation, which can produce lots of problems down the road.

Each Thanksgiving, I fix a full holiday meal in our camper, or outside of our camper. Over the years, we have purchased some really good equipment that we carry with us...a grill, a flat-top griddle, a butane burner and a CampChef oven. These are my mobile kitchen essentials and I can use them anywhere.

My suggestion is to look at a camper that has good storage and don't buy something because it says "airstream", but look for good quality vs investment cost. Plan to set up an outside kitchen that can be used in any weather.

Good luck.


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propchef

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Posted: 12/21/20 05:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sjm9911 wrote:

Ok, so , i cook a bit. You will have a small inadequate kitchen in a camper. The stoves are low pressure, i have yet to see one with a good flame. In fact when the ac is on the flame is worse. Lol. Oven is almost the same, but workable. Best bet is to have a good outdoor set up. Good propane grill, griddle and burner. Also invest in a set of aluminum pots that nest. A few good knives, and forget the set of mixing bowles. Well maybe one that serves as a mixing bowl and mesering bowl/ strainer. You can keep the cast iron pan , i bring 2 of them. You will learn to adapt. Dont rip out the microwave just yet. I never use mine at home, ok popcorn only. But in the TT i use it a lot. Make meals and freeze them, pop in the microwave and dinner is ready. Now you can cook at home. I have also transitioned to paper plates for clean up. Sometimes the water conservation is hard! I would figure most of the TT have simmiler kitchens and storage capabilities. You learn to make due with less. Use stones in the oven for even heat. Grill more, cook on the stovetop less. Have fun and good luck with the search.


Good info about the gas pressure, that was one of my issues.

I avoid aluminum pots and pans in my personal collection. They're reactive to acids and won't work on an induction burner (I have several tabletop models I use for demos). My 10" skillet serves me well. I'll also have a 3 quart and 6 quart sauce/soup pot with lid.

I have more knives than, well, I have a lot of knives as does the wife. Hers are Kicuichi, handmade. I'm not allowed to use them. [emoticon]

I haven't used a microwave in more than 20 years, including at work. We have three kitchens and a production bakery, and one microwave that staff uses occasionally to reheat something they brought from home. Trust me, we won't use it.

Bowls, we must have bowls. Many of them. They nest and take up no space and are immensely useful.

propchef

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Posted: 12/21/20 05:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Merrykalia wrote:

I have owned and cooked in 6 different campers...popup, hybrid, travel trailer, 2 different fifth wheels and now a motorhome.

I could cook up a good meal in all of them...some, just a bit easier. The popup had a tiny fridge and 2 burners. That limited what we could do inside, so I mostly cooked outside under a canopy. The hybrid was a bit more challenging because the stove was directly across from the bathroom door. Again, most of it was done outside.

A trailer is small...no matter how big it is, compared to a residential kitchen, it's small. The use of a burner also heats up the camper quickly, even in cold weather. It also produces lots and lots of steam, which produces condensation, which can produce lots of problems down the road.

Each Thanksgiving, I fix a full holiday meal in our camper, or outside of our camper. Over the years, we have purchased some really good equipment that we carry with us...a grill, a flat-top griddle, a butane burner and a CampChef oven. These are my mobile kitchen essentials and I can use them anywhere.

My suggestion is to look at a camper that has good storage and don't buy something because it says "airstream", but look for good quality vs investment cost. Plan to set up an outside kitchen that can be used in any weather.

Good luck.


The condensation was a worry. Ventilation. I assume no outside ventilation for the cooking area? Is that standard across the industry?

The Airstream was an example because we have other considerations other than the kitchen, of course. I like the bath separated from the sleeping area, and the Bambi bath stretches across the back. It's a good size. There are other trailers I like as well, with the Lance mentioned earlier and one or two of the Outdoors RV TTs.

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