Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Tire Size
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Fossil Hunter

Paso Robles, CA

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Posted: 01/24/21 02:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just purchased a new trailer that came with 205/75 R15 tires.
Any harm in going up to a 225/75 R15 tire?
I would like the increased plys and load range.
Thank you.


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 01/24/21 03:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You don't have to change tire sizes, just go up in the load range..

You can get Load range E in your default size of 205/75 R15..

SEE HERE

"Capacity: Load range: E Ply rating: 10 Maximum load: 2,830 lbs at 80 psi Maximum speed: 81 mph (speed rating M) "

2,830 lbs capacity and plyrating of 10 which is the same as 225/75 R15 Load range E.

Going to 225/75 R15 will net you nothing than paying more and perhaps due to larger diameter might even scrape/rub the wheel well and at worst wheels may end up touching while in motion..

Moving up to Load range E will also require airing up the tires to maximum side wall pressure of 80PSI get that extra capacity. Airing LR E to 50 PSI may net you LESS capacity than a LR C aired to 50 PSI.

This may exceed your max rim pressure if you have LR C tires (LR C side wall pressure is 50 PSI).

Honestly, since you just bought it and if it is brand new off the lot, I would recommend using as is. For the most part, unless you are severely overloading and or underinflating the tires spec'd by the manufacture will meet the absolute min of required ratings.

The main key here is to make sure you inflate and maintain the tires to the SIDE WALL PRESSURE. Generally as long as you do that they should be fine..

After the tires have worn down then consider moving up to a heavier load range, IF you experience a blown tire.. Higher load range adds weight which can be problematic with braking..

* This post was edited 01/24/21 03:21pm by Gdetrailer *

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 01/24/21 03:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer, that top tire show 225-E. All 205-15 are C & D that I am aware of.

For the OP watch your approved wheel width and clearance before you jump to 225s. May need new wheels. Keep in mind trailer suspensions do deflect significantly when turning sharp.

I have and recommend the Goodyear Endurance ST205R15-D. Speed rated to 80 something.

* This post was edited 01/24/21 03:45pm by time2roll *


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Fossil Hunter

Paso Robles, CA

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Posted: 01/24/21 03:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm interested in the Goodyear endurance tire. I had them on a previous trailer and they worked great.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 01/24/21 04:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

Gdetrailer, that top tire show 225-E. All 205-15 are C & D that I am aware of.

For the OP watch your approved wheel width and clearance before you jump to 225s. May need new wheels. Keep in mind trailer suspensions do deflect significantly when turning sharp.

I have and recommend the Goodyear Endurance ST205R15-D. Speed rated to 80 something.


Right you are.. Looks like a bug in that websites search that substituted 225 for 205..

LR D for 205 is 8 ply rating and is good for 2,150-lb max load at 65 psi

Not sure how big and heavy the OPs trailer is but for two axle trailer you have 8600 lbs of capacity with LR D..

LR C has ply rating of 6 and a 1,820-lb maximum load at 50 psi and for two axle you have 7280 lbs of capacity..

But as I mentioned before, if OP has LR C to get the extra capacity they MUST inflate to sidewall pressure which in LR D is 65 PSI..

I still stand by the statement that as long as they have bought a BRAND NEW TRAILER there is no compelling reason to change tires or sizes "just because" they want more ply rating and should just run what they have until worn..

IF they experience a blowout, THEN move up.. The odds of a blowout are not all that great, yes, there have been some folks who have experienced multiple blowouts, but the reality is those most likely are self inflicted by overloading and or underinflating.

Running over stuff on the road like nails, bolts and other objects, jumping curbs can damage even the highest ply rating tire available even on the lightest load..

Heck I blew out a 10 ply tire on a empty pickup just running over a bolt on the road that I never saw.. Just heard a woosh sound.. Tire mechanic pointed to the size of hole and said non repairable, a bolt went through, too big of hole to repair..

The blowout scare on this and many other forums are way over hyped..

time2roll

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Posted: 01/24/21 04:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would also run the existing new trailer tires for at least two seasons before replacement unless they delaminate or show other defects.

Lynnmor

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Posted: 01/24/21 04:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would use Goodyear Wrangler HT and skip the ST tires.





MFL

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Posted: 01/24/21 05:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Op has not said what his new trailer GVWR is, or what load range tire is on it. He may already have D rated tires. If he has C rated oem, they would have to be adequate. If he wants, or needs a bit more cushion for his load, D rated Endurance would be a good choice.

Jerry





Lwiddis

Death Valley NP

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Posted: 01/24/21 05:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Nor has OP told us the load range of his current tires.


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Boon Docker

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Posted: 01/24/21 05:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

Op has not said what his new trailer GVWR is, or what load range tire is on it. He may already have D rated tires. If he has C rated oem, they would have to be adequate. If he wants, or needs a bit more cushion for his load, D rated Endurance would be a good choice.

Jerry


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