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wa8yxm

Davison Michigan (East of Flint)

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Posted: 06/24/21 05:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok re-charging rates.. Recommendations vary from both battery manufacturer to manufacturer and from Others as well

Xantrex for exmple recommended 30% C/20 as the peak
Trojan 10%
Lifeline originally 30% as the MINIMUM initial current later reduced to 20%
(That is only for their AGM batteries)

Generally speaking the lower the recharge rate (Down to a point) the longer the overall life of the battery. I suspect that point is Trojan's 10%

I ran around 550 AH of batteries with 80 amps peak for 9 years.


Home was where I park it. but alas the.
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after a semi "nicked" it. Still have the radios
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Almot

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Posted: 06/24/21 06:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cliffy49 wrote:

My toy hauler is old fashioned in that every thing except for the outlets, A/C, micro wave and tv are the only things that run off of shore power.

The micro wave is something that we very rarely run and if we do need the a/c or want to watch the tv I can always use the genny for the a/c and get an inverter for the tv.

There are still many units like this in production. They sometimes put all-electric fridge but not everybody wants it, propane fridge draws so little DC current that you will run out of water and propane before running out of battery. Not that I'm thrilled with propane fridges but they are easy on battery.

Propane fridge will draw 8-12 AH per 24 hours. If furnace is not needed, an energy-savvy couple could make it on 30-40 AH a day, most of this will be fridge and water pump. Limited use of microwave could add another 30 AH. As noted, many things people "want" to have in boondocks but it is a question whether those are necessities, and the list is truly endless. To harvest reliably 80 AH you need 400-600W flat solar. A smaller array won't cut it on cloudy days.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 06/25/21 06:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

Ok re-charging rates.. Recommendations vary from both battery manufacturer to manufacturer and from Others as well

Xantrex for exmple recommended 30% C/20 as the peak
Trojan 10%
Lifeline originally 30% as the MINIMUM initial current later reduced to 20%
(That is only for their AGM batteries)

Generally speaking the lower the recharge rate (Down to a point) the longer the overall life of the battery. I suspect that point is Trojan's 10%

I ran around 550 AH of batteries with 80 amps peak for 9 years.


ya, and to get around the worry of to much, you could also use tempature compensated solar charger. I have this set up alredy, just have to add another pannel before I need it yet.

Steve


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cliffy49

Blue Grass

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Posted: 06/29/21 11:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Want to thank every one for all of the information. I am thinking that I will probably go with a kit in the 200/400 range. It will probably be closer to 200 watts since we have not yet tried boondocking.

At some point in the future we may but in the mean time we can always use the genny if absolutely needed.


cliffy49
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2021 Silverado Custom 2500HD
2018 Catalina TH26 Toy hauler


Boon Docker

Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta

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Posted: 06/29/21 12:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

200 watts is a good place to start. Be sure to get a charge controller with enough amperage if you want to upgrade the panels later.

Happy Camping

cliffy49

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Posted: 06/29/21 01:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Boon Docker wrote:

200 watts is a good place to start. Be sure to get a charge controller with enough amperage if you want to upgrade the panels later.

Happy Camping


I know that most people will reccomend the Victron line but I really do not want to spend that much on a controller. Does anyone have a less expensive option? Probably looking at the MPPT(?) type.

pianotuna

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Posted: 06/29/21 04:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cliffy49,

Just make sure what ever you get will handle 400 watts. The charge controllers are often the most expensive part of the system.

Look at MorningStar, Outback, as well as Victron.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 06/29/21 04:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cliffy49 wrote:

Want to thank every one for all of the information. I am thinking that I will probably go with a kit in the 200/400 range. It will probably be closer to 200 watts since we have not yet tried boondocking.

At some point in the future we may but in the mean time we can always use the genny if absolutely needed.


a good starting point would be to fall in the middle. get say one 315 watt 24 Volt panel and get a controler than can handle 2 of them. then later if you decide you need just a bit more its cheep to add a second panel.

Steve

Boon Docker

Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta

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Posted: 06/29/21 04:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cliffy49 wrote:

Boon Docker wrote:

200 watts is a good place to start. Be sure to get a charge controller with enough amperage if you want to upgrade the panels later.

Happy Camping


I know that most people will reccomend the Victron line but I really do not want to spend that much on a controller. Does anyone have a less expensive option? Probably looking at the MPPT(?) type.


"Tracer" charge controller has good reviews and won't break the bank. My "Tracer" has been charging my pair of GC2 batteries for almost 9 years now.

Almot

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Posted: 06/29/21 05:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cliffy49 wrote:


I know that most people will reccomend the Victron line but I really do not want to spend that much on a controller. Does anyone have a less expensive option? Probably looking at the MPPT(?) type.

Renogy Rover 30 with Bluetooth: https://www.renogy.com/rover-li-30-amp-mppt-solar-charge-controller/.

Going MPPT makes future expansion easier, you can add panels in series onto the same #10 cable, just connect the pigtails between the panels. MPPT allows using 24V panels, those are cheaper per watt than 12V panels. Rover 30 can handle 400-450W array, so you can install a single 200-220W panel now and add another panel later if you want. The only drawback of 24 panel is 40 lbs weight, somebody should give you a hand to lift it on the roof.

When adding 24V panel later, it should better be same wattage so I suggest you install 400W from the beginning. Chances are that with 400W you won't need a generator, other than for running A/C.

Rover 40 could handle 2 pretty big panels, total 550-560W, same price as Rover 30 but no Bluetooth option. It probably has pre-programmed charging profiles for flooded, AGM and gel battery, so it will work.

I had a bad experience with MPPT Tracer aka Epever. Horrible proprietary software, help files are in impossible Chinglish - I am not new to controllers or software but this one was a big pain. Flimsy terminals. Sent it back and bought Renogy - not perfect but better. Though my case was unusual - I needed to adjust the charging parameters and on Epever this can only be done through the added software and laptop, inconvenient and the software is poor.

Forget "kits", they rarely have the panel you want with the controller you want with the length of MC4 #10 cable that you want.

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