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 > Why do I keep blowing out tires on my truck?

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BobsYourUncle

Calgary Alberta Canada

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Posted: 08/01/21 06:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It has to be something related to that particular corner of the truck. It seems odd it's always the same one.

Don't let the Michelin naysayers sway you on those tires. I run the same ones on my truck - best tires ever. Last set was 79,000 and change miles before I replaced them. Trouble Free. Current set of them is 74,000 miles and still going. It will be Michelins again.
I did replace one of them, but it was a road hazard into the sidewall. No brand is immune from that.

I'd be looking for something peculiar to only that corner. Where does the exhaust pipe dump? Does it hit the tire?


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JRscooby

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Posted: 08/01/21 07:23am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Point, underinflation will cause blowout, over-inflation, very unlikely.
Overload can cause blowout.
Had 2 blowouts RR of a trailer. The third tire, I used white shoe polish to make 'whitewalls' on all of the trailers. With evidence, I adjusted the driver's attitude

dodge guy

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Posted: 08/01/21 08:52am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’ll second the only rotate front to back. That’s all I do. Going side to side can cause damage because the tire has a memory and when it spins in one direction for thousands of miles and you switch it to rotate in a different direction then it came cause the rubber and steel to fatigue sooner. Bias plus never had that issue.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 08/01/21 09:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Devo the dog wrote:

Overinflation.


All that would do is wear out the center of the tire. He said he religiously inflates to 80 towing.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 10:21am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:

I’ll second the only rotate front to back. That’s all I do. Going side to side can cause damage because the tire has a memory and when it spins in one direction for thousands of miles and you switch it to rotate in a different direction then it came cause the rubber and steel to fatigue sooner. Bias plus never had that issue.


That is the biggest falsehood I’ve heard posted on here in a while! Which says alot considering this is rvnet, the land of wacky theories and methodologies! Lol

I find it hard to believe you even said that. Aren’t you a Dodge mechanic? You should know better.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 10:22am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Devo the dog wrote:

Overinflation.


All that would do is wear out the center of the tire. He said he religiously inflates to 80 towing.


10-4 12V. Another useless response by Devo. Surprised he didn’t attribute it to being a Chrysler product!

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 10:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

Stop buying Michiblows….next caller please!


I have ran Michelin’s for at least one million miles with one flat and no cracks.


My comment was semi tongue in cheek! But all BS aside, I haven’t experienced the stellar life span personally that you have.
I’m sure we’ve had 100s of trucks on Michelin’s without issue at work. But I don’t track job truck tire life. They’re more prone to buying the farm early due to damage, lack of rotation or overloading.
Personally have had 2 sets of Michelin’s I can recall. 1 was a new takeoff set off of a 2000era Ram 2500 that I put on my half ton. So no overloading possible. Tires were cracking at less than 3 years from their born on date.
Other was a set of super high performance car tires. Tires were 2 years old 2010 vintage and over half tread on a car that was a garage queen under the prev owner. They too were dry rotting a year later.
No failures with either vehicle, but neither of these examples sat out and baked in the sun but they were dry as a popcorn fart and cracking.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 10:46am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP, it is highly unlikely it’s a vehicular issue. Unless you literally had the same rim in the same position for 10 years and never rotated tires.
It’s also unlikely overloading, unless there’s more to your loading scenario than you posted. But that would make both rear tires equally suspect for failure.

The only plausible explanation aside from coincidence I see is sun damage and the dynamic loading of your rear tires under the pin weight. Which is more than the dynamic loading on the fronts even though the fronts carry more static load when empty.

Maybe you’ll expound and maybe verify that it truly was tread separation and not some form of damage that caused the blow outs.
In my experience, passenger side tires in general are more susceptible to road damage from debris, as most debris ends up on the right shoulder of the road and is easiest hit by the right side tires.
Maybe coincident but our new truck with big neg offset wheels picked up 3 different punctures last winter. 1 RF and 2 RR. 1 was a bolt and the other 2 were pieces of broken tire chains, obviously picked up the only place I drove where chains required and in the snow when they were likely invisible, because I only went over the pass during good snow conditions for riding.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 10:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

dodge guy wrote:

I’ll second the only rotate front to back. That’s all I do. Going side to side can cause damage because the tire has a memory and when it spins in one direction for thousands of miles and you switch it to rotate in a different direction then it came cause the rubber and steel to fatigue sooner. Bias plus never had that issue.


That is the biggest falsehood I’ve heard posted on here in a while! Which says alot considering this is rvnet, the land of wacky theories and methodologies! Lol

I find it hard to believe you even said that. Aren’t you a Dodge mechanic? You should know better.


And while I don’t usually google stupid stuff like this. It got the better of me.
Couldn’t find a single “recommendation” that didn’t promote side to side rotation as a viable option.

ALTHOUGH, to your point, I also generally only rotate straight front to back unless I am trying to correct some unusual tread wear.
What is viable, is on a rwd vehicle, the drive axle tread will feather in the opposite direction of the steer axle tread. Front to back only rotation keeps the tread feathering in check.
Or in the case where rear tread wear isn’t greater than front, and tires are all equal wear not necessitating putting the best tread on the right rear to help it “catch up”, I may rotate side to side only, which has the same effect as front to back but by different means wrt correcting feathering of the tread.
This is more pronounced in vehicles with heavy axle loads, aggressive tread and or more torque/aggressive acceleration. And much less noticeable in the opposite conditions.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 11:04am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:

It’s possible they are overinflated.
You need to do some weighing
Truck empty
Truck loaded for a trip with hitch in bed
Truck and trailer
Then you will know your true weights.


See, if you did a little math with the known weight (approx) of the rear of a HD truck empty and the likely range of pin weight, the OP is right in range for 80 psi on those tires.
Unless you’re going one step further and forcing the OP to admit that he’s carrying a half load of firewood and a rock collection or that maybe his trailer is magically reaaaaly light weight on the pin. In which case he’d be overinflated but it wouldn’t hurt the tires one bit.

Some of the suggestions here are about as viable as Martians are coming down and destroying one tire on his truck every 3 years!

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