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 > Why do I keep blowing out tires on my truck?

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pitch

NY

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Posted: 08/02/21 06:49am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most tires these days are directional. Front to rear is the only rotation.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 09:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:


And yes changing the direction of rotation of a tire after thousands of miles can and does make a difference!


That you are correct sir. It DOES make a difference, for the good though, by correcting the tread feathering rather than allowing it to continue, if direction of rotation is changed by swapping L to R on the same axle. (Speaking for rwd/4wd vehicles, never had a fwd car long enough to care aboot the tires_
X rotation also changes rotation, but does not correct tread feathering.
If one watches how a tire wears in a specific position on a vehicle, there is almost always an option (not always the same option) to optimize the life of all 4 tires.
General exceptions being tires worn quicker or unevenly due to vehicle issues (alignment, etc), or lack of rotations causing a pair to wear further than the other , or burnouts! lol

But the notion that changing rotational direction on a tire that is not a directional tire is somehow harming the tire inherently is absolutely false.
FWIW, even directional tires will not be damaged running "backwards", they just won't perform quite as well.

But I am not the authority on tires....nor are you, or you'd understand this.

PS, you should tell capriracer he's FOS too, but I believe he actually is "the guy."


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Wishin

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Posted: 08/02/21 10:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3 things come to mind after reading all the above.

1. Heat from the exhaust. Is something wrong with your exhaust or engine that is causing your exhaust to put more heat into that tire than it normally would? I'm guessing the exhaust travels past that tire like it does on most trucks.

2. Over loaded, not likely based on your truck and trailer, but perhaps it might be a good idea to be sure.

3. Sitting in the sun. I think you said that tire sees more sun than the other ones? Perhaps keep it covered. It is pretty hot where you live in Phoenix. I'm from Michigan where tires don't usually see much heat damage, but I worked with a guy that lived there for a couple of years and he said tires just don't last much longer than 3 years down there from his experience and from the tire guy he went to.

What kind of tire life do most people in south Arizona get in years?


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BenK

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Posted: 08/02/21 10:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another thought...

Front tires don't get nail induced flats as often as rear tires, because the front tire will kick up the nail that has been laying on its side.

Then the nail dances upright for the rear tire to hit it. 50/50 whether nail head or pointed end.

Right side says the OP, so that means road shoulder more often than the left side and dependent where/how the OP drives

Then if the OP has had that rear, passenger side tire repaired in the wrong area of the tire...it will have it low on air often and why asked the OP if the right rear was low more often than the others.

Running too low PSI damage is cumulative and if the OP drives on the fast side of speed limits, accelerates the heating to separate the tread.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 12:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pitch wrote:

Most tires these days are directional. Front to rear is the only rotation.


Considering we're on a RV forum and the topic is about trucks and RVs, I cannot think of a single truck/RV tire that is directional....
I'm sure one of the rvnetters will come up with an example and claim I'm wrong, because likely one exists, but I'd like to see "most" of the directional truck tires you're talking about.

Even car tires are less than 50%? I'd say directional. There are even plenty of performance tires that aren't directional. Have 2 performance cars now both with low pro Z rated tires. Neither are directional.

BTW, "directional" tires are really of no practical advantage except in ultra high performance applications.

Wishin

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Posted: 08/02/21 02:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

pitch wrote:

Most tires these days are directional. Front to rear is the only rotation.


Considering we're on a RV forum and the topic is about trucks and RVs, I cannot think of a single truck/RV tire that is directional....
I'm sure one of the rvnetters will come up with an example and claim I'm wrong, because likely one exists, but I'd like to see "most" of the directional truck tires you're talking about.

Even car tires are less than 50%? I'd say directional. There are even plenty of performance tires that aren't directional. Have 2 performance cars now both with low pro Z rated tires. Neither are directional.

BTW, "directional" tires are really of no practical advantage except in ultra high performance applications.


Agreed, directional tires make up a pretty small % of the market unless you're shopping for winter tires. All my winter tires for all 4 of my vehicles are directional (including my Suburban).

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 02:42pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Devo the dog wrote:


BTW, now that you pointed out that my post is useless and you're surprised that I didn't attribute the problem because it's a Chrysler product, you can never again call yourself unbiased and level headed.


Huh??

1 word. Meds.

You need some.

Devo the dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 04:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

joshuajim wrote:

Possible that the RR brake Is “hanging” and causing excessive heat in the tire.


If so the pads would be gone and backing plates would be gouging the rotors.

Leave it up to 12V to only think of extremes: The calipers are either floating on the rotors or gouging the rotors, and nothing else. LOL. Typical knuckledragger.

If the caliper is not releasing the pad completely and it's always riding the rotor, it'll generate heat and wear a little more than the rest. That's possible and it hasn't been ruled out, except by 12V and Gritdog.

I think JRscooby is on to something: Right turns and rubbing curbs is also a possibility.

BTW, how much over inflated will a tire need to be to do damage? In this case, it's unknown. It's still unknown if the tire pressure gage is accurate, so it's difficult to answer. There are too many variables. The only consistant items are three blowouts on the same tire at approximately the same mileage, and gritdog and 12V thinking they know everything.


The dodge fan boys hate the dodge/ram dealerships. Now that I have owned a Mexican Fiat Oui-Oui (La fiat wee-wee), I understand why.
The only thing more incompetent than Ram is Bye-don and his supporters.

Grit dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 05:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Devo the dog wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

joshuajim wrote:

Possible that the RR brake Is “hanging” and causing excessive heat in the tire.


If so the pads would be gone and backing plates would be gouging the rotors.

Leave it up to 12V to only think of extremes: The calipers are either floating on the rotors or gouging the rotors, and nothing else. LOL. Typical knuckledragger.

If the caliper is not releasing the pad completely and it's always riding the rotor, it'll generate heat and wear a little more than the rest. That's possible and it hasn't been ruled out, except by 12V and Gritdog.

I think JRscooby is on to something: Right turns and rubbing curbs is also a possibility.

BTW, how much over inflated will a tire need to be to do damage? In this case, it's unknown. It's still unknown if the tire pressure gage is accurate, so it's difficult to answer. There are too many variables. The only consistant items are three blowouts on the same tire at approximately the same mileage, and gritdog and 12V thinking they know everything.


With all due respect, OP never said if he did or didn't rotate his tires. 3 sets of tires over 9-12 years and 75-90k miles (I think he said 25-30k on each set before blowout), with even marginal tire rotation practices would have made it very unlikely that the same tire was in that position it's entire life.
Although the "can't change rotation" knuckledraggers could argue that that tire should have only gone front to back on the same side and that's a very likely sequence with typical tire wear.
But at the same time, the right rear, if any, tends to wear quicker than the other tires unless you drive like a complete vegetable, which would have that tire off the RR and somewhere else in a proper rotation.

And 75-90k miles of brakes hanging up even marginally, WOULD toast those brake pads long before the third or maybe even the second tire was in play. But let's say for your sake that it was hanging up just a teensy weensy bit. Then it wouldn't have made much heat.


But to grasp at all the straws, his gauge (because I'm sure it was the same one for 10 year...lol) must have been waaaay off to blow the guts out of the tire. But he must only uses THAT gauge on THAT tire and uses other gauges on other tires so he only blew one tire to kingdom come 3 times over and not the other three......

Cummins12V98

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Posted: 08/02/21 06:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Over the time of three tires a set of pads WILL be shot and steel to steel if dragging. That is simply the truth.

* This post was edited 08/02/21 10:11pm by Cummins12V98 *


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