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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 10/17/21 06:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

We are all just shooting in the dark until we know what make and model refrigerator you have. Or at a minimum, is it a true 12V DC refrigerator or does it run on 120V AC from an inverter.

Two things that will improve its operation while towing are 1) a DC-DC charger and 2) a better battery, like lithium ion.


OP says Residential refrigerator. I would assume 120v.


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MT BOB

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Posted: 10/17/21 06:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well,the next logical step would be to check for 12 volts at the inverter.
BUT,some things you can check-
1 all the fuses and circuit breakers
2 you might have a separate "changeover/transfer switch/module, and it may have a switch on it
3 My best guess--- some Forest River products have a battery disconnect switch, that only disconnects the batteries from the inverter. Usually located in the battery compartment. Dealers turn them off because the inverter can discharge the batteries when sitting unused for a while.
Good Luck.

Cummins12V98

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Posted: 10/18/21 09:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good idea on the disconnect.

Campinfan

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Posted: 10/18/21 09:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have the residential fridge and it works great off the inverter when I am towing. I have the stock Interstate deep cycle rv battery from the dealer.


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laknox

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Posted: 10/18/21 10:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Coach-man wrote:

That is the downer to residential fridges! If you stay put for long periods, and only move occasionally then they are great! Now, if your on the move a lot, your going to have to become an “expert” on batteries, and inverters. Starting with the alternators, yes plural. In your truck. Did your rig come with an inverter? What size is it, does it power more than the fridge? Perhaps, you need to upgrade it, or add one if not present? What is the amp rating on your house batteries? Typically, the factory ships their rigs without batteries, which are provided by the dealer at the time of sale. Again, they typically install the smallest, cheapest batteries they can get away with providing! Some people install a couple of 6 volt golf cart batteries, to ensure they are providing enough amps to run things! That would then require, looking at your charging systems, both in the trailer, and in your truck, keeping the batteries charged! Yep a residential fridge can become an expensive option, if you outfit your truck and rig to support it! Good luck!


Actually, 2 12v "marine" batteries will usually provide a few more amp hours of storage than the typical 6v golf cart batteries but will require more frequent charging to avoid damage. In my experience, it's usually 225-230 Ah for 2 12v batteries (voltage stays at 12v but Ah doubles when connected in parallel), but the typical 6v golf cart batteries are around 210 Ah and stay at that level when connected in series for 12v power. The =real= advantage to deep cycle 6v golf cart batteries is that they can be drawn down a lot further than so-called "deep cycle" 12v batteries without damage, and can do so many, many times.

Lyle


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laknox

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Posted: 10/18/21 10:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Diamond c wrote:

I just went out and checked and as I suspected the inverter is on. So I’m going to assume that it’s the truck that isn’t setup to charge the 5er. I’ll have my son-in-law to look at it again and if he can’t figure it out then I’ll take it to the dealership.


Make sure your battery disconnect is ON! I learned the hard way that if it's not on, my batteries wouldn't charge. Also, a single alternator will not charge up 2 batteries unless you drive all [email protected] day long. Had my old FW plugged in for 5 days at my house and found that my batteries were well down before leaving for a 3 hour drive for our annual family boondocker, because the disconnect was OFF. Got to our site and batteries were still in the yellow so ended up having to run my truck for about an hour each day, on top of 45w of solar, just to stay in the yellow. My current KZ is the same way.

Lyle

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Posted: 10/18/21 02:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

laknox wrote:

Diamond c wrote:

I just went out and checked and as I suspected the inverter is on. So I’m going to assume that it’s the truck that isn’t setup to charge the 5er. I’ll have my son-in-law to look at it again and if he can’t figure it out then I’ll take it to the dealership.


Make sure your battery disconnect is ON! I learned the hard way that if it's not on, my batteries wouldn't charge. Also, a single alternator will not charge up 2 batteries unless you drive all [email protected] day long. Had my old FW plugged in for 5 days at my house and found that my batteries were well down before leaving for a 3 hour drive for our annual family boondocker, because the disconnect was OFF. Got to our site and batteries were still in the yellow so ended up having to run my truck for about an hour each day, on top of 45w of solar, just to stay in the yellow. My current KZ is the same way.


No an alternator will not charge two dead batteries but it will keep two charged batteries charged all day.

Lyle



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laknox

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Posted: 10/18/21 03:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

12th Man Fan wrote:

laknox wrote:

Diamond c wrote:

I just went out and checked and as I suspected the inverter is on. So I’m going to assume that it’s the truck that isn’t setup to charge the 5er. I’ll have my son-in-law to look at it again and if he can’t figure it out then I’ll take it to the dealership.


Make sure your battery disconnect is ON! I learned the hard way that if it's not on, my batteries wouldn't charge. Also, a single alternator will not charge up 2 batteries unless you drive all [email protected] day long. Had my old FW plugged in for 5 days at my house and found that my batteries were well down before leaving for a 3 hour drive for our annual family boondocker, because the disconnect was OFF. Got to our site and batteries were still in the yellow so ended up having to run my truck for about an hour each day, on top of 45w of solar, just to stay in the yellow. My current KZ is the same way.


No an alternator will not charge two dead batteries but it will keep two charged batteries charged all day.

Lyle


Not in my experience...

Lyle

Veebyes

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Posted: 10/19/21 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Start by reading the documentation that came with the rig.

Does it have an inverter? If so, was it turned on? An inverter is only as good as the size of the battery bank that it feeds off of. Typically off the dealer lot you will get 2 group 24 batteries. Just barely better than useless.

Going down the road the TV really does not put very much back into the trailer battery bank because of light wiring & distance causing VD. Solar does not put much back unless obviously under sun & exposed for long periods of time.

The new domestic type fridges are much better at power consumption than they used to be but if you don't have or don't have turned on what they need, all you have is a big cooler during the time you are on the road.


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Coach-man

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Posted: 10/19/21 08:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

laknox wrote:

Coach-man wrote:

That is the downer to residential fridges! If you stay put for long periods, and only move occasionally then they are great! Now, if your on the move a lot, your going to have to become an “expert” on batteries, and inverters. Starting with the alternators, yes plural. In your truck. Did your rig come with an inverter? What size is it, does it power more than the fridge? Perhaps, you need to upgrade it, or add one if not present? What is the amp rating on your house batteries? Typically, the factory ships their rigs without batteries, which are provided by the dealer at the time of sale. Again, they typically install the smallest, cheapest batteries they can get away with providing! Some people install a couple of 6 volt golf cart batteries, to ensure they are providing enough amps to run things! That would then require, looking at your charging systems, both in the trailer, and in your truck, keeping the batteries charged! Yep a residential fridge can become an expensive option, if you outfit your truck and rig to support it! Good luck!


Actually, 2 12v "marine" batteries will usually provide a few more amp hours of storage than the typical 6v golf cart batteries but will require more frequent charging to avoid damage. In my experience, it's usually 225-230 Ah for 2 12v batteries (voltage stays at 12v but Ah doubles when connected in parallel), but the typical 6v golf cart batteries are around 210 Ah and stay at that level when connected in series for 12v power. The =real= advantage to deep cycle 6v golf cart batteries is that they can be drawn down a lot further than so-called "deep cycle" 12v batteries without damage, and can do so many, many times.

Lyle


As long as we are splitting hairs, I have found Marine type batteries just a little better than useless! The so called “marine” battery is part “deep cycle” and part starting battery. Designed for people with trolling motors, as well as the “big” out board. Instead of getting the best of both worlds, you wind up with the worst of both worlds. A good deep cycle will not have a cold crank rating, used for starting. Your RV environment usually consists of the batteries sitting with a trickle charge for long periods, followed by running them way down. Only big draw back with the 6 Volt golf cart batteries is you must keep an eye on the water level, “high maintenance”. Good luck.

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