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 > Changing a tire yourself

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klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 10/25/21 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My only flat on my C in 6 years and when AAA got there we found the bracket holding the spare tire into the rack was bent. he had to unbolt and remove the rack to get the tire out, so do check that from time to time.
And he borrowed my tools to do the job.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/25/21 12:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For you DIY tire changers out there (of which I'm maybe one, if ever required in certain situations):

1. Sometimes "along side" the road is soft, so in addition to all the tire changing equipment you might have along, you better have some boards (and shovel) along to create a proper support area for the jack's base.

2. You might want to not have just a regular high-tonnage hydraulic jack along - the better high-tonnage jack is one that extends higher just in case. i.e. A jack with dual cylinder capability so as to extend more than normal. i.e. What if the road shoulder is slanted downwards from the roadway, and the flat is on the side away from the roadway and you have/want to get the RV axle with the flat somewhat level?

3. If your spare is mounted up underneath like they are on pickup trucks (and is the case on our RV) ... even though you might be able to drop, drag, and mount the spare - where are you going lift up and store the flat tire if you can't lift it back up and secure it underneath?

4. Don't forget you may have to do tire changing in extreme heat, cold, rain, snow, sleet, high wind conditions, etc.. You might want to carry along a tarp, suitable clothing, and a portable fan to blow on you if you're doing tire changing work in the extreme heat.

5. If - worst case - you think you can merely "camp out" while waiting for roadside service to arrive and change your spare -> what if you're on a highly tipped/rough area just off the roadway. Will the RV be at too much of an angle to not damage your propane refrigerator and/or ruin food inside while you wait hours and hours for help?

Of course if you're a boondock camper, you better be able to change your RV's tire in all kinds of strange situations. For this we carry along a satellite communication device ... but I hope my budget can afford to have $$$$$ trailside service come out to rescue us!

* This post was edited 10/25/21 12:16pm by pnichols *


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toedtoes

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Posted: 10/25/21 02:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good considerations. For me, the answers would be:

1. I carry the plastic blocks with me - both in the MH and in the SUV.

2. This is why I carry two jacks. I have had an instance where I needed to use one jack to lift the vehicle so far, then placed a couple blocks under the second jack to lift it a bit further. I would also roll the vehicle to the least unlevel spot.

3. This happened to me. I simply put the bad tire in the back of the SUV until I could take it to a tire shop.

4. I keep a moving blanket, tarp, rain poncho, and a regular blanket in both vehicles.

5. In a worst case scenario, where there would not be a fairly level spot to pull over, food would be my least concern.


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DrewE

Vermont

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Posted: 10/25/21 03:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've changed a tire "in anger" on my motorhome (while on the road) twice: once because a tire came apart apparently due to internal damage or defects, and once because I managed to maneuver too close to a stump and got some bits of wood stuffed up between the sidewall and the rim. I won't say it's fun, but it wasn't a terrible ordeal for me and I thought beat waiting for AAA to find someone to help and for them to come. (I have also had AAA come to change the tire once on the motorhome, the result of cutting too close to a curb not long after I had gotten it, and aside from taking some time to get someone out it worked out just fine. I did not have a jack at the time.)

In any case, I just use a pretty standard bottle jack with an adjustable height center column that can be screwed upwards to increase the height, a 24" breaker bar, and appropriate sockets--and, of course, wheel chocks diagonally opposite. I've done pretty much the same task in my own driveway a few times, too, for various reasons, most commonly because a tire or brake shop didn't realize the big holes in the Centramatics should be lined up with the inner valve stems so you can check and fill the tires.

I have usually just put the removed tire in the middle of the kitchen area, inside the main door of my motorhome, where there's a nice big spot on the floor; it's quicker than cranking it up with the lift mechanism for the spare.





pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/25/21 05:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

Good considerations. For me, the answers would be:

1. I carry the plastic blocks with me - both in the MH and in the SUV.

2. This is why I carry two jacks. I have had an instance where I needed to use one jack to lift the vehicle so far, then placed a couple blocks under the second jack to lift it a bit further. I would also roll the vehicle to the least unlevel spot.

3. This happened to me. I simply put the bad tire in the back of the SUV until I could take it to a tire shop.

4. I keep a moving blanket, tarp, rain poncho, and a regular blanket in both vehicles.

5. In a worst case scenario, where there would not be a fairly level spot to pull over, food would be my least concern.


Food would be my last concern, too ... but distruction of my propane refrigerator - from being too long parked at an angle while waiting for ERS to arrive and install the spare - would be a serious concern! [emoticon]

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 10/25/21 05:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My thought with the food being my last concern is that if I were stuck in an off-kilter position, I would turn the fridge off. Then no concern about damage to it.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 10/25/21 07:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

2. You might want to not have just a regular high-tonnage hydraulic jack along - the better high-tonnage jack is one that extends higher just in case. i.e. A jack with dual cylinder capability so as to extend more than normal. i.e. What if the road shoulder is slanted downwards from the roadway, and the flat is on the side away from the roadway and you have/want to get the RV axle with the flat somewhat level?!
Also note when you are buying a hydraulic jack that it needs to get under the axle/frame when the tire is flat or completely gone. Clearance can get very tight. Many higher tonnage jacks with decent lift may not go low enough.


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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/25/21 11:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

pnichols wrote:

2. You might want to not have just a regular high-tonnage hydraulic jack along - the better high-tonnage jack is one that extends higher just in case. i.e. A jack with dual cylinder capability so as to extend more than normal. i.e. What if the road shoulder is slanted downwards from the roadway, and the flat is on the side away from the roadway and you have/want to get the RV axle with the flat somewhat level?!
Also note when you are buying a hydraulic jack that it needs to get under the axle/frame when the tire is flat or completely gone. Clearance can get very tight. Many higher tonnage jacks with decent lift may not go low enough.


My high lift jack also starts out very low, then extends to around 20 inches. Just in case, I carry a full size shovel so that I can dig a shallow hole for the jack base if the jack doesn't start out low enough. Sometimes the hole might need a board in the bottom of it to make a firm base for the jack, in which case the hole would need to be large and deep enough to also make room for the board. My jack has a long handle so I can work it when it may be hard to otherwise reach it under the axle and in the hole.

mgirardo

Brunswick, GA

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Posted: 10/26/21 08:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When we owned our Class C, it came with a fully mounted spare and a lug nut wrench, but no jack. The one time I assisted someone replace a flat on a smaller Class C, the rims were partially rust welded together and was a serious pain to separate the two rims even with a long tire iron.

We had AAA Plus with RV when we owned the Hybrid TT and kept it with the Class C. We had 1 blow out of an inner dual in the 7 years we owned it and I was glad to wait for AAA to find someone to take care of it for us. We waited about 2 hours for AAA to find someone, mainly because they were trying to find someone that could tow the Motorhome to a safer place if the Motorhome was not in a safe place. The company that came out within 30 minutes of getting the call could not tow the Motorhome and had the tire swapped quickly. I guess AAA finally gave up on the tow requirement. Fortunately, the rims separated without issue.

For us, AAA is as much about how much money we save on discounts at Hotels, Campgrounds, restaurants, etc. and it is rare that a year goes by and the savings don't pay for the membership.

-Michael


Michael Girardo
2017 Jayco Jayflight Bungalow 40BHQS Destination Trailer
2009 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS Class C Motorhome (previously owned)
2006 Rockwood Roo 233 Hybrid Travel Trailer (previously owned)
1995 Jayco Eagle 12KB pop-up (previously owned)

Lumpty

Greater Gotham City

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Posted: 10/26/21 05:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Luckily never had a flat on the current Class C, but have rotated a 6 tires a few times. To do so requires jacking opposite diagonal corners up. I use my 3-ton floor jack under the axle corner, and a 6-ton bottle jack under the front Twin-I beam. Each only has to be lifted enough to daylight under the tires. The bottle jack lives in the motorhome, along with the appropriate socket, 1/2” drive extension and breaker bar. If I had to change a tire on the road I could do it easily.


Rob

Too Many Toys.
- '11 E450 Sunseeker 2300
- '16 F150 Supercrew 5.0/FX4
- '09 C6 Z51
- '15 VW Golf Sportwagen daily driver
- '86 Civic and '87 CRX race cars

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