Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Anyone using the Mr. Heater "Journey" catalytic heaters?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Anyone using the Mr. Heater "Journey" catalytic heaters?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/01/21 10:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

ktmrfs wrote:

Unvented propane appliances dump slightly less than a gallon of water into the air for every gallon of propane burned.


Operating on the 1500 BTU "low" heat setting, a catalytic heater would need to run 2.5 continuous days to consume a gallon of propane (and thus produce one gallon of water).

One person exhales that same amount of water in roughly 48 hours (not counting daily activities such as bathing, showering, washing dishes, etc.)

So - Yes, it contributes some additional moisture, but not a huge amount.


If your in a relatively dry climate, I agree as I mentioned earlier the additional moisture may not be an issue and may help bring the RH up to a more comfortable range. But if your in an area like we are where RH is already high, add to that body moisture, small enclosed space, and cool surfaces and it doesn't take much additional moisture to get surfaces below the dew point and end up with condensation and a RH that is uncomfortable.

And if your lucky enough that the low setting of 1500BTU is enough, great, but if you need 5000BTU or more, compounds the potential moisture issue.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!


Skibane

San Antonio, TX

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/01/21 07:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

And if your lucky enough that the low setting of 1500BTU is enough, great, but if you need 5000BTU or more, compounds the potential moisture issue.


1,500 continuous BTUs is roughly equivalent to a 15,000 BTU furnace running 10 percent of the time.

Max output of this particular heater is 3,000 BTUs. If I need more than that, the furnace can make up the difference.

Using the furnace a little beats using it a lot, IMO.

Then again, if you're really that concerned about the extra moisture, just leave one of the kids at home. [emoticon]

MT BOB

Montana

Full Member

Joined: 03/02/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/01/21 07:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

ktmrfs wrote:

And if your lucky enough that the low setting of 1500BTU is enough, great, but if you need 5000BTU or more, compounds the potential moisture issue.


1,500 continuous BTUs is roughly equivalent to a 15,000 BTU furnace running 10 percent of the time.

Max output of this particular heater is 3,000 BTUs. If I need more than that, the furnace can make up the difference.

Using the furnace a little beats using it a lot, IMO.

Then again, if you're really that concerned about the extra moisture, just leave one of the kids at home. [emoticon]


Not really. Most RV furnaces are not very efficient, you may be getting only 11,000 btu's of heat from it. Then there is the electricity use,especially if not plugged in. Then the noise.Then the huge losses from duct work,in bigger rv's/campers, usually run in cold spaces. Just some reasons space heaters are so popular in rv's. Also,gas and electric space heaters are 100% efficient. If they have fans,then a bit less.

Skibane

San Antonio, TX

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/21 01:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^You're ignoring the fact that unvented heaters need to have a window or ceiling vent opened a bit to replenish the oxygen they consume, and to reduce moisture build-up.

There is some heat loss through that opening.

Any way, my point is that a small heater which runs constantly can put just as much heat into living areas as a much larger furnace that only runs occasionally.

Gdetrailer

PA

Senior Member

Joined: 01/05/2007

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/21 01:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

^You're ignoring the fact that unvented heaters need to have a window or ceiling vent opened a bit to replenish the oxygen they consume, and to reduce moisture build-up.

There is some heat loss through that opening.

Any way, my point is that a small heater which runs constantly can put just as much heat into living areas as a much larger furnace that only runs occasionally.


Although, you are ignoring the fact that much of the efficiency of a unvented IS going right out the window and ceiling vent especially when you add in a little bit of wind above zero MPH.

Not arguing that 1500 BTUs setting can create some heat under mild conditions to be somewhat comfortable. But in reality not enough once outside temps drop and the winds blow along with the square footage you are trying to heat.. Small area like containg the heat to just your sleeping area and sure 1,500 BTU might keep you cozy under a few layers of blankets.. Heating a 30ft space, well that amounts to trying to stay warm with a single candle..

I have heated my 26ft TT with one single oil filled radiator heater in winter to do some work.. At 1,500W setting you get roughly 5,200 BTUs.. Worked just OK when winter temps were in the 45F or higher and no wind blowing. Once temps got below 30F and a nice 10 MPH wind and took that heater hrs to bring temps up to 45F-50F.

TT came with a 24K BTU gas furnace, I upgraded that to a 30K BTU furnace.. Now if I want to work in the TT even on the coldest days furnace has no issue getting trailer up to temp that I am comfortable in without the need for long underwear, two layers of coats, heavy hat and thick gloves. As a bonus, the upgraded furnace runs for much less time than the smaller one, means less battery use.

Just depends on your perspective of what is "comfortable" living quarters temps..

Skibane

San Antonio, TX

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/21 03:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

Not arguing that 1500 BTUs setting can create some heat under mild conditions to be somewhat comfortable. But in reality not enough once outside temps drop and the winds blow along with the square footage you are trying to heat.


Based on my own experience, I have to disagree.

In windy 40 degree weather, I have used the 1500 BTU setting on my Olympian catalytic heater as the sole heating source to stay very comfortable in a 28 foot class A - with a ceiling vent cracked open for ventilation.

30 degree weather requires the 3000 BTU setting.

Naturally, I could have installed one of the larger catalytic models instead (or installed a second heater located some distance from the first), but I never felt like I needed it.

PerryB67

Lanesboro, Minnesota

Full Member

Joined: 07/07/2017

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/21 03:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

Although you are ignoring the fact that unvented heaters need to have a window or ceiling vent opened a bit to replenish the oxygen they consume, and to reduce moisture build-up.

There is some heat loss through that opening.

..................................

Just depends on your perspective of what is "comfortable" living quarters temps..
Yes, there is some heat loss. Have you ever put your hand on the exhaust from your furnace. Now that's heat loss! It's huge!

The heat loss from one of our awning windows opened 1/4 - 1/2" and our Maxxfan open the same is virtually nothing, and certainly a huge difference over the furnaces heat loss.

Wind is not a problem. I just make sure the awning window chosen to be cracked is not directly into the wind.

I'll agree that comfortable to one is not the same to the other. Our camper is a 21' Escape 5.0 fifth wheel. The body is about 20.5' long, 7' 4" wide and around 6'8" interior. It's all we need.

We use our Weber catalytic heater when the overnight temps get below 40 F, otherwise when the temps are over 40F the Weber is too warm. At about 30 F we kick the furnace in gear to make up any difference. The Weber on low will run all night on one re-fillable 1# tank.

Enjoy,

Perry

* This post was edited 11/03/21 08:36am by PerryB67 *


2018 Escape 5.0
2019 F150 Max Tow, Max Springs, 3.5 EB Quad Cab
Victron 712, Victron 100/20, Victron 100/30
GoPower 170 watt, and three Renogy 100 Compact watt panels, all in parallel
260 ah Soneil SiO2 batteries


ajriding

st clair

Senior Member

Joined: 12/28/2004

View Profile



Posted: 11/02/21 08:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

you can't delete a post, just the words in the post.

So, how many gallons of water does one gallon of propane make?
My water question is where is all this water coming from? It can't be all from the propane.
As mentioned, a human will breath out about the amount of water that could fit into a 1lb propane bottle (little less), so running one is like having a second person... just curious...

Other mention. The heaters will heat mass in your camper (walls, kitchen stuff, water, shoes, whatever is there, and these things keep the heat. It is not so much that the air needs to stay warm, but that the mass around you stay warm, so venting some air out is not catastrophic, though that is air that could still be warming up interior mass.
Yea, venting some air out or seeing half your propane heat blow out the exhaust are probably similar numbers, but the Buddy heaters probably still win even though you vent some thru windows

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/02/21 09:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:

you can't delete a post, just the words in the post.

So, how many gallons of water does one gallon of propane make?
My water question is where is all this water coming from? It can't be all from the propane.


water comes from combustion of propane, (or gasoline, or diesel, or natural gas) see my above post. Burning hydrocarbon (CxHy) + O2 = CO2 + H2O (water) + heat. And yes burning a gallon of propane yields slightly less than a gallon of water. it is emitted as water vapor.

C3H8+5O2= 3CO2 + 4H2O + Heat
Carbon Dioxide + Water + Heat (exothermic reaction)

* This post was edited 11/02/21 10:12pm by ktmrfs *

Tom_M

New Hope, MN

Senior Member

Joined: 04/24/2011

View Profile


Online
Posted: 11/03/21 06:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a Buddy heater that I removed the regulator from and plumbed it into my propane line with a hose. I spend winters in Florida which is very humid and have had no issue with condensation. Just make sure to crack the roof vent and a window a bit. It uses much less propane than the furnace and uses no electricity. I have a CO detector with a display and it has never gone above zero.

I'm tempted to try the Flame King's version which has the added benefit of a thermostat and a bit higher output.

Available on Amazon:

Flame King portable heater on Amazon


Tom
2005 Born Free 24RB
170ah Renogy LiFePo4 drop-in battery 400 watts solar
Towing 1978 VW Bug convertible
Minneapolis, MN


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Anyone using the Mr. Heater "Journey" catalytic heaters?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.