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 > Dealing with the "Barfmeister"

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Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 12/03/21 08:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Augie is a 2 yr old Australian Shepherd who clearly has a "fussy tummy". A few times per week I find myself cleaning up barf :-( He gets fed twice a day, dry food (Diamond Naturals "All Life Stages") plus little bits of "people food", although he gets less and less of those treats as I try to figure what is causing everything he eats to reverse course. He also gets a Milk Bone at night, so he doesn't have an empty stomach all night. A forensic examination of what I'm cleaning up (at least now in his adult years), generally shows there was a buildup of either the "yellow foamies", or simply a bunch of phlegm. It's certainly NOT consistent, as though he had a food allergy.

He's not sick, or showing signs of allergies - he's playful, energetic, has a gorgeous silky coat, etc. I also realize that dogs are able to barf if the slightest thing upsets their tummies. My other dog Ben eats the same stuff and never upchucks.

So here are my questions: can dogs suffer "post nasal drip"? I'm wondering what is causing all the phlegm. I kind of doubt it's external stuff like pollen, since Augie is equally as barfy back home in Michigan.

Or is there something I can give him to either cut back on the phlegm, or to ease his touchy digestive system? After he loses his dinner - I'll put some more dry food in his dish, he'll eat it happily and it stays down.

Thanks for any tips I can try!

ReneeG

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Posted: 12/03/21 08:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Could it be a food allergy, to the dog food? We've had two dogs with food allergies. One's manifested with diarrhea and the other spit up just enough digested food that it made a mess. Both were grain allergies. We switched foods and it solved everything.


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dturm

Lake County, IN

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Posted: 12/03/21 09:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With nasal and sinus issues you almost always see or hear breathing issues or "reverse sneeze."

The foamy phlegm is more likely excess saliva that was produced before vomiting where nausea was happening.

Regular vomiting could be nothing but also could be a sign of more serious problems (chronic pancreatitis for example). You might have a blood panel and urinalysis run just to rule out more serious issues. If everything is normal I usually recommend changing foods. There are some OTC anti-nausea meds and some more intensive prescription meds if necessary.

BTW, Kaylee has chronic pancreatitis and is on low fat diet, no table food and Ondansetron daily. It has controlled her vomiting to the point where it's unusual rather than frequent.

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BB_TX

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Posted: 12/03/21 11:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You need to have him examined by a vet. Guessing is not a good option. As Doug states, could be many things. We have dealt with that on a couple of our past dogs.

toedtoes

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Posted: 12/03/21 12:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree to get a check up with the vet to rule out serious issues. My thought since it is phlegm coming up that maybe he has acid reflux. That can cause vomiting hours after eating.


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Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 12/03/21 03:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

I agree to get a check up with the vet to rule out serious issues. My thought since it is phlegm coming up that maybe he has acid reflux. That can cause vomiting hours after eating.


I had been wondering if dogs can have this. Many years ago, my previous Aussie would forget to eat for many hours, then vomit up the "yellow foamies". I'd give him a piece of bread with Pepto soaked into it - he'd eat it grudgingly - but that seemed to calm his tummy and after a bit, he'd be able to eat some dog food. But I would kind of know what was coming - his stomach would be growling like a cat fight. Augie shows no signs of upset stomach, ever. Eats his food - then we cross our fingers because it could come back up real soon - or many hours later; or most times, not at all.

I guess I'll have to find a local Vet while we're in FL.

Thanks, everyone!

dturm

Lake County, IN

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Posted: 12/03/21 04:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dogs can have reflux and acid problems. It's a little harder to diagnose because they don't tell us they have the burning sensation [emoticon].

I forgot to say that Kaylee is also on Pepcid once daily for her issues.

Pawz4me

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Posted: 12/03/21 04:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

I agree to get a check up with the vet to rule out serious issues. My thought since it is phlegm coming up that maybe he has acid reflux. That can cause vomiting hours after eating.


I've had three dogs who had a tendency toward "yellow foamy" throw up two or three times a week. My vet recommended famotidine (generic Pepcid) for the first one and it worked wonders. So for the other two I just went ahead and gave it a try, and it worked for them, too. If it's mainly happening in the morning sometimes making sure the dog has a couple of dog biscuits or other bland bedtime snack can help, IME. For some it seems to happen when their tummy gets too empty.


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toedtoes

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Posted: 12/03/21 05:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dturm wrote:

Dogs can have reflux and acid problems. It's a little harder to diagnose because they don't tell us they have the burning sensation [emoticon].

I forgot to say that Kaylee is also on Pepcid once daily for her issues.


I only thought of it because I have asthma and acid reflux and the combination will have me hacking up phlegm. I had to look up if dogs get it.[emoticon]

Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 12/04/21 07:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pawz4me wrote:

toedtoes wrote:

I agree to get a check up with the vet to rule out serious issues. My thought since it is phlegm coming up that maybe he has acid reflux. That can cause vomiting hours after eating.


I've had three dogs who had a tendency toward "yellow foamy" throw up two or three times a week. My vet recommended famotidine (generic Pepcid) for the first one and it worked wonders. So for the other two I just went ahead and gave it a try, and it worked for them, too. If it's mainly happening in the morning sometimes making sure the dog has a couple of dog biscuits or other bland bedtime snack can help, IME. For some it seems to happen when their tummy gets too empty.


I DO give a bedtime snack of a Milkbone, just so there's something in their stomachs - and I also read up on how a gallbladder really functions; so I'm going to try eliminating any fatty additions to his regular food and see if that helps. Part of this plan will involve using a shock collar - on my husband who insists on sharing everything he eats with the dogs..... ;-)

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