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 > Tesla Cybertuck - Can we take another thread?

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rjstractor

Maple Valley, WA

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Posted: 12/13/21 07:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

BobsYourUncle wrote:

I read a thought provoking jab at EVs this morning, something I never considered. Not trying to stir anything up, but out of lack of knowledge, it makes me wonder.

Let's suppose ICE vehicles are gone and it's all EV.
I'm sure we have all been in a situation where there is a major issue on the road, a bad wreck, a weather problem, whatever. The highway is closed for many hours while they address the situation, perhaps even overnight or longer. And its January. You and everyone else is sitting there trying to stay warm and you have a 3 mile lineup of EVs with dead batteries....
How good are the heaters in an EV, and how much power do they draw?
How do you rescue hundreds of motorists and clear a highway full of dead battery vehicles?

Maybe the solution is simple and I don't see it...


In that kind of situation an EV is a pretty good place to be. AN EV heater keeping a car warm draws less than a KW. A typical EV has a 60 to 100 kWh battery. You could sit there warm and cosy for days with no problem. The upcoming half ton EV’s have batteries between 140 to 200 kWh. You could probably stay warm and comfortable for a week in those. Same in summer with AC. Doesn’t take much to keep a warm car warm or a cool car cool.


Agree with Reisander on this one- A pickup with a 25 gallon tank uses about 1/4 gallon per hour idling and an EV with a 100 kwh battery will draw about 1 kw to keep the car warm. Either way, with a full tank or battery you have heat for 100 hours. Takes a whole lot more heat energy to move a car down the road than it does to heat it. It's easier to use a gas can to get an empty ICE vehicle going than getting a dead EV going, but they tell car drivers to be mindful of their fuel level before heading over a pass. EV drivers will need to do the same. But a 4-6 hour pass closure should not be an issue.

NamMedevac 70

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Posted: 12/13/21 10:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The one photo I have seen of the cybertruck is a real ugly PO* and doesn't even look like a truck. I will gladly pass.

time2roll

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Posted: 12/13/21 10:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BobsYourUncle wrote:

I read a thought provoking jab at EVs this morning, something I never considered. Not trying to stir anything up, but out of lack of knowledge, it makes me wonder.

Let's suppose ICE vehicles are gone and it's all EV.
I'm sure we have all been in a situation where there is a major issue on the road, a bad wreck, a weather problem, whatever. The highway is closed for many hours while they address the situation, perhaps even overnight or longer. And its January. You and everyone else is sitting there trying to stay warm and you have a 3 mile lineup of EVs with dead batteries....
How good are the heaters in an EV, and how much power do they draw?
How do you rescue hundreds of motorists and clear a highway full of dead battery vehicles?

Maybe the solution is simple and I don't see it...
More likely to run out of fuel idling your ICE vehicle.

With an EV the idle draw to run the computer is nothing in comparison. EV might even be more comfortable in extreme conditions as the systems do not rely on a minimum rpm for cooling or minimum engine energy for heat.

Either way there will always be someone very low on fuel or out with a nearly depleted battery. Battery might be more likely to be full due to top off daily vs weekly when the tank is low.

EV will not create any CO issues.

* This post was edited 12/13/21 10:42pm by time2roll *


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pianotuna

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Posted: 12/13/21 11:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

17% of the US population lives in either apartments or condos, making the whole "charge at home" thing a little tougher.

So, who will pay for an appropriate number of charging stations at these locations when (and if) the demand for EV's skyrockets?


If they live north of 43 they may have electric services already. We have to be able to plug in block heaters.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

pianotuna

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Posted: 12/13/21 11:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BobsYourUncle wrote:

Let's suppose ICE vehicles are gone and it's all EV.
I'm sure we have all been in a situation where there is a major issue on the road, a bad wreck, a weather problem, whatever. The highway is closed for many hours while they address the situation, perhaps even overnight or longer. And its January. You and everyone else is sitting there trying to stay warm and you have a 3 mile lineup of EVs with dead batteries....
How good are the heaters in an EV, and how much power do they draw?
How do you rescue hundreds of motorists and clear a highway full of dead battery vehicles?


Hi Bob,

They use heat pumps. I suspect the EV would fare far better than the ICE in such a context. Heat seaters are resistance based but draw little energy. Mine draw about 50 watts.

It would be interesting to know how B.C. solved the issues of all the ice cars that were trapped by mud slides before and behind them.

RetiredRealtorRick

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Posted: 12/14/21 04:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

17% of the US population lives in either apartments or condos, making the whole "charge at home" thing a little tougher.

So, who will pay for an appropriate number of charging stations at these locations when (and if) the demand for EV's skyrockets?


If they live north of 43 they may have electric services already. We have to be able to plug in block heaters.


If you're speaking of the 43rd parallel, not a lot of the US population currently lives north of it, and I really doubt that we'll ever see a strong migration to that area [emoticon]

Also, block heaters have been around a long, long time, and aren't they just 110 or 120v? (asked the Florida boy).


. . . never confuse education with intelligence

Reisender

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Posted: 12/14/21 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

17% of the US population lives in either apartments or condos, making the whole "charge at home" thing a little tougher.

So, who will pay for an appropriate number of charging stations at these locations when (and if) the demand for EV's skyrockets?


If they live north of 43 they may have electric services already. We have to be able to plug in block heaters.


If you're speaking of the 43rd parallel, not a lot of the US population currently lives north of it, and I really doubt that we'll ever see a strong migration to that area [emoticon]

Also, block heaters have been around a long, long time, and aren't they just 110 or 120v? (asked the Florida boy).


120 is fine for those with a daily commute up to about 80 or 90 kilometres. We did that for years with our first EV. We used the soffit plug meant for Christmas lights. And I suppose one could always pop into a DC fast charger if the.need arose. Roughly half of people with EV’s just use the included charge cord and a 120 volt plug. At least in our neighbourhood. The other half had stove plugs installed in their garage or driveway.

Groover

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Posted: 12/14/21 07:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Getting run down EV's going shouldn't be a big problem with a little preparation. All you need is to have a small generator or portable battery pack to get the electronics awake in the event that the batteries are totally run down. In the few minutes that it takes to get them up rig install the towing eye and lash the EV to a tow truck or other handy vehicle with adequate charge/fuel and tow it away. If the towing vehicle has enough extra towing juice use regen to in the stranded EV to quickly charge it up enough to make it independent.

While it is not recommended I have seen several tests where people did just that and it worked well.

pianotuna

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Posted: 12/14/21 08:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

17% of the US population lives in either apartments or condos, making the whole "charge at home" thing a little tougher.

So, who will pay for an appropriate number of charging stations at these locations when (and if) the demand for EV's skyrockets?


If they live north of 43 they may have electric services already. We have to be able to plug in block heaters.


If you're speaking of the 43rd parallel, not a lot of the US population currently lives north of it, and I really doubt that we'll ever see a strong migration to that area [emoticon]

Also, block heaters have been around a long, long time, and aren't they just 110 or 120v? (asked the Florida boy).


That's right--only about 40 million people.

RetiredRealtorRick

St. Augustine Beach, FL

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Posted: 12/15/21 04:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

17% of the US population lives in either apartments or condos, making the whole "charge at home" thing a little tougher.

So, who will pay for an appropriate number of charging stations at these locations when (and if) the demand for EV's skyrockets?


If they live north of 43 they may have electric services already. We have to be able to plug in block heaters.


If you're speaking of the 43rd parallel, not a lot of the US population currently lives north of it, and I really doubt that we'll ever see a strong migration to that area [emoticon]

Also, block heaters have been around a long, long time, and aren't they just 110 or 120v? (asked the Florida boy).


That's right--only about 40 million people.


So that's 12% of the population. As I said, not many.

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