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 > Tesla with a generator on a hitch haul

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Reisender

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Posted: 01/03/22 02:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mkirsch wrote:

Reisender wrote:

Yah. I agreed with everything you just said. But for pre-heating the Tesla doesn’t work like that. The poster mentioned he had been running the genny for 24 hours. It takes 5 or 7 minutes to pre-heat the tesla and it can do it from it’s own battery. He or she was running the genny for other reasons. Probably low charge. Makes sense, albeit really slow. Even at 24 amps 120 volts from that genny.


Maybe you missed the part about "severely reduced capacity in cold temperatures?"

Sure you can warm it up using its own batteries, but how much of a hit on range will there be pulling from the cold batteries?

Maybe the owner ran the generator to keep the car and batteries warm for the 24 hours it sat there, rather than let the batteries get cold and having to start from scratch? That generator can't run for 24 hours at full capacity, and isn't all that quiet so I doubt it was actually charging the car. Those Hondas are really only quiet at idle.


To go from minus 20 to plus twenty in our driveway while not plugged in takes 5 or 7 minutes. It’s about a 2 percent hit on the battery. I’m not sure what severely reduced capacity means but typically around here one should count on losing about a third of your normal range for the winter temps we get.

Teslas don’t have anything like a block heater function. Just plugging it in won’t keep anything warm. The cars needs to be actively charging for heat to be diverted for battery warming.

Again. Not questioning the drivers motives for plugging in. More than likely he had a good reason. But pre-heating wouldn’t be one of them unless he wanted to keep the interior of the vehicle warm continuously for days on end. Maybe a pet inside. Who knows.

Agreed on the noise of the genny. We have a 3400 watt propane genny that we use for emergency home backup. Once every couple months we exercise it and use the Tesla as a variable load as I can vary it from 5 to 24 amps on 120 volts. Works well. But when up at 24 amps it’s working hard and is considerably louder. Meh. It’s once every couple months for 20 minutes and the neighbour does the same thing so it’s all good.

Pre-conditioning on navigation to a supercharger is another topic. In this case the battery is preheated about 30 minutes or so before arriving at a supercharger. This insures max charge rate when arriving at the supercharger. But that’s all automatic and outside the scope of this conversation.

Cheers.

* This post was edited 01/03/22 02:29pm by Reisender *

pianotuna

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Posted: 01/03/22 03:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender.

Thanks for the update on not moving and charging.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp-hours of Telcom jars, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

rjstractor

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Posted: 01/03/22 04:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

rjstractor,

I found 24 kw to move 100 miles, on the wobbly wide web. (model 3 Tesla)

However I did not know that when plugged in the tesla won't move. I guess that is a good safety feature.


Don, a Model 3 doesn't go 100 miles on 24 kilowatts, it goes 100 miles on 24 kilowatt/hours. I think you're confusing the concepts of absolute power output (kw) and power output over time (kw/hr). It's kind of like the idea of torque and horsepower.

Since the car takes 24 kw/h to go 100 miles, that little generator would need to run for just over 9 hours at 2.6 kw to produce that much power. So the car would be moving at about 11 mph. That's assuming it was able to put all that power into the car battery, which it can't. To move the car at highway speed (60 mph) for 100 miles, the generator would need to produce the 24 kw/h in 100 minutes, which requires a generator with a power output of 15 kw. That's a pretty big generator to pack on a hitch hauler. [emoticon]

pianotuna

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Posted: 01/03/22 04:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree kwh is correct--but I was doing a "paste" from the tesla report.

Groover

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Posted: 01/03/22 06:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rjstractor wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

rjstractor,

I found 24 kw to move 100 miles, on the wobbly wide web. (model 3 Tesla)

However I did not know that when plugged in the tesla won't move. I guess that is a good safety feature.


Don, a Model 3 doesn't go 100 miles on 24 kilowatts, it goes 100 miles on 24 kilowatt/hours. I think you're confusing the concepts of absolute power output (kw) and power output over time (kw/hr). It's kind of like the idea of torque and horsepower.

Since the car takes 24 kw/h to go 100 miles, that little generator would need to run for just over 9 hours at 2.6 kw to produce that much power. So the car would be moving at about 11 mph. That's assuming it was able to put all that power into the car battery, which it can't. To move the car at highway speed (60 mph) for 100 miles, the generator would need to produce the 24 kw/h in 100 minutes, which requires a generator with a power output of 15 kw. That's a pretty big generator to pack on a hitch hauler. [emoticon]


That is also more than you can put in at 240V. Without higher voltage you are capped at 12kw.

Huntindog

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Posted: 01/03/22 06:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All this makes two things obvious to me. Battery tecnology inspite of having come a long way, needs to improve a great deal in order to replace Fossil fueled autos.
And the fact that RVers can now benefit from the improvements in batteries for boondocking.
I flat out love my Battle Borns in my Momentum



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Learjet

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Posted: 01/03/22 06:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

two things stick out in the thread...ignorance and people afraid of changes.


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CA Traveler

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Posted: 01/03/22 07:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

99 Good News Stories 2021

https://medium.com/future-crunch/99-goodnews-2021-2492e4fcacfb

Interesting article, Electric Vehicles section below and suggests significant change are coming for cars and trucks. How about #76?

Solving climate change isn’t just about decarbonizing electricity, industry and agriculture, but also transport, which accounts for a third of global carbon emissions. On that front, it’s been a standout year. So good in fact, that for the first time ever we’re giving EVs their own section (we usually include them with clean energy).

73. 2021 was the year that the world’s carmakers finally seemed to accept the inevitability of an all-electric future. General Motors said it would eliminate the sale of all fossil fuel powered cars and SUVs by 2035, Jaguar said it would stop selling them within the next five years, and Hyundai said no more after 2040.

74. Ford said it would sell only EVs in Europe from 2030, Fiat said it would be an all electric company by 2030, Volvo said its entire car line-up would be fully electric by the same year, and both Audi and Daimler-Mercedes announced they were no longer developing new combustion engine models.
In terms of products, there is no longer any rational reason to opt for a combustion engine in the near future.
Wolf-Henning Scheider
CEO, Mercedes Benz

75. In March, the IEA said that the global demand for gasoline had peaked, and was unlikely to return to pre-pandemic levels given the shift to electric vehicles, and in July, the world officially rid itself of leaded gasoline, after a refinery in Algeria used up the last stockpile. It took a 40 year campaign by the UN to achieve this, and it’s estimated elimination will prevent more than 1.2 million deaths annually.

76. If you remember just one number from this section, make it 10%. That’s the proportion of global vehicle sales that are now electric. To put this in perspective, in the first quarter of 2010, 395 electric vehicles in total were sold worldwide, 0.002% of passenger car sales. In the last quarter of this year, 1.7 million were sold, of which more than half were in Asia.


77. Sales in Germany and China were particularly mindblowing. More than a third of new German cars sold are now plugins, while in the world’s largest car market EV sales have reached nearly 20%. In October, the Tesla Model 3 was the best selling car in Europe (not the best selling electric vehicle — the best selling car, overall), and Hertz bought 100,000 of them for its new fleet, the largest electric car order of all time.

78. In May, Ford unveiled its new electric pickup truck, the F-150 Lightning, whose petrol-powered counterpart, the F-150, is the biggest selling pickup truck in the United States. The real gamechanger however, were the first customer deliveries for all electric carmaker Rivian’s new truck, and the company’s subsequent $100 billion plus valuation, higher than GM or Ford.

79. It wasn’t just passenger vehicles that had a good year. Ebike sales continued to boom, and trucks also proved they were poised for electrification, as 13 models were released in the US alone. Also, we heard that the global fleet of battery powered buses has increased by 22% since 2019, and 18% of all municipal buses on the road worldwide are now zero-emissions.

80. Canada and Chile announced bans on sales of combustion vehicles by 2035, the EU proposed a plan to do the same (although it’s not law yet) and then the really big one: at COP26, 37 countries, including the UK, India, Mexico, Morocco and Turkey, committed to phasing out gas car sales by 2035 in rich countries, and by 2040 in poorer ones.

81. Thanks to progressive policies over the past 24 years, California announced that it had clocked up a 78% reduction in diesel particulate pollution, the toxic black stuff from car exhausts, and that the cleaner air had resulted in 82% fewer deaths from heart and lung disease. New York also became the second state after California to announce combustion engine ban, after governor, Kathy Hochul, signed a bill requiring all passenger vehicles sold in the state to be emissions-free by 2035.

82. In December, the US EPA issued new rules that significantly tighten greenhouse gas emissions levels for new cars, SUVs, and pickup trucks sold in model years 2023 through 2026. All told, these standards will cut carbon emissions by 3.1 billion metric tons by 2050, equivalent to two full years of emissions from all transportation in the United States.


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valhalla360

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Posted: 01/03/22 08:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

For example, after 7 years of driving an EV our lifetime average is 6.4 kilometres per 1 kw of electricity.


This is part of the issue with these discussions...not keeping proper units. Then things get convoluted and misconstrued.

One instantaneous burst of 1kw is not going to push a car 6.4 kilometers. In fact being on for just an instant, the car won't have time to accelerate at all.

I suspect you meant 1 kwh.


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valhalla360

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Posted: 01/03/22 08:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rjstractor wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

rjstractor,

I found 24 kw to move 100 miles, on the wobbly wide web. (model 3 Tesla)

However I did not know that when plugged in the tesla won't move. I guess that is a good safety feature.


Don, a Model 3 doesn't go 100 miles on 24 kilowatts, it goes 100 miles on 24 kilowatt/hours. I think you're confusing the concepts of absolute power output (kw) and power output over time (kw/hr). It's kind of like the idea of torque and horsepower.

........


Again, please use the correct units...particularly if you are correcting the use of units.

24 kw/hr implies if you start from a standstill the power output will gradually ramp up from 0kw until an hour later it will be at 24kw (assuming you continue for an hour). In common usage, it's a nonsense value that has no real use.

The correct units are kilowatt hours (KWH).

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