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 > Good battery for Boondocking Palomino Puma 19RL

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Sandy5

Ohio

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Posted: 01/04/22 06:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you! Won't be doing solar, this is going across the country (out west) so it will be in all sorts of different areas.

valhalla360

No paticular place.

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Posted: 01/04/22 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sandy5 wrote:

There is currently one battery box 11.5x8x8
And may I ask why marine or RV batteries are not as good?
A few replies stated:
"compromises like the RV/Marine batteries"
and "marine deep cycle are compromised batteries"
Are they not truly deep cycle?


The design for starting batteries is lots of thin plates. Surface area defines how many amps a battery can throw off. For starting, thin plates provide more surface area and thus more amps. Your average dual purpose battery is just a starting battery with different lugs compared to a dedicated starting battery.

The design for deep cycle batteries are fewer but thicker plates. With less surface area, they can throw off fewer amps. Thicker plates are better at storing more energy (ie: they can throw off their amps for a longer period of time). Outside of very expensive specialized batteries, you will find difficulty sourcing a 12v deep cycle battery. 6v golf cart batteries on the other hand are easy to source and true deep cycle designs.

Note: Assuming they can put out the amps, there is no harm in using deep cycle batteries for starting. (example: on a sailboat with a 30hp diesel and a large house battery bank, you can use the house bank to start the engine with no problem).

Now back to your question:

Before running out and buying batteries, make a stab at estimating what your power consumption will be. Otherwise, you may wind up spending money on items that don't work and then may not fit in with your final solution.

Start with an energy audit (it won't be perfect but better than people randomly telling you to get X system).
- Decide how long you expect to be off grid.
- Guestimate how long each item will run (lights, TV, waterpump, furnace, laptop/phone chargers, etc...) Find the wattage for each and multiply times the duration they will operate. This will give you a total watt-hour you need to replace each day. Add 20-30% as the systems aren't 100% efficient and you might miss some items.
- Don't plan on air/con unless the generator is running (this is a whole different subject)
- Divide your watt-hr by 12 to get amps-hr @ 12v. Then double it to see how big of a battery bank you need. Lead-acid batteries generally don't like to go below 50% charge, so you can't use the full rated amp-hr.
- 6v golf cart batteries are likely the cheapest option and if only 2 or 4, likely a good choice. If you need much more than that weight starts becoming an issue in a small RV. Then you move into lithium which is a new subject with different considerations.
- Now you need to charge the battery bank. If you are just weekending for a couple of days, you can just double the watt-hrs and install a larger battery bank. Or you can run the generator to charge them (caviot: it takes a very long time to go from 90% to 100% with lead-acid batteries, so it may be more effective to go a bit larger on the battery bank as 50-90% can charge fairly quick). Alternatively, you can add solar. Figure 4-5times the nominal watt rating in watt-hr (ie: a 100w panel will generate 400-500watt-hr per day)

This should give you a good idea of the scale of what you need.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


CA Traveler

The Western States

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Posted: 01/04/22 09:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Generators are used to charge 50-85% SOC because the last 15% is a slow charge that takes many more hours. Solar can fill that in. Also with some sun solar can do a complete charge for the day. So something to consider as you learn.

And there is a lot of sun for a lot of your travels - but from the news Ohio currently not so much recently.


2009 Holiday Rambler 42' Scepter with ISL 400 Cummins
750 Watts Solar Morningstar MPPT 60 Controller
2014 Grand Cherokee Overland

Bob


pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 01/05/22 12:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sandy5,

If you plan on being a "rolling stone" then look into adding a dc to DC charger to the RV.

Solar is, in my opinion the nearest thing to a free lunch you are likely to find. It need not be terribly expensive, and the battery bank will love it.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp-hours of Telcom jars, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

valhalla360

No paticular place.

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Posted: 01/05/22 04:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Solar is, in my opinion the nearest thing to a free lunch you are likely to find. It need not be terribly expensive, and the battery bank will love it.


Yes, something as simple as a 100w portable panel you plug into the battery bank can address the long duration it takes to fill the last 10%. Charge with the generator quickly in the morning up till around 90% and then let the solar finish it off over 8-9hours.

Sandy5

Ohio

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Posted: 01/05/22 04:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to share advice on this matter, I appreciate it!

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 01/05/22 05:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As stated, two 6V golf cart batteries is the best bang for the buck.

However, even better would be two 12V LiFePO4. Double the stored energy. If you want to recharge while driving, buy a DC-DC battery charge.

If you decide to buy an inverter, get one that has a builtin charger and automatic transfer switch. These are easier to install and easier to use. Remove your existing converter and connect directly to the batteries.

MFL

Midwest

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Posted: 01/05/22 07:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm sure the OP is looking for a simple setup, and is asking for a battery recommendation.

I would recommend starting out with an interstate rv/marine 12v, in the largest size to fit box, maybe group 27. It is best to get a fresh/close to current date battery, not one that has been sitting on a shelf for a year. Walmart sells a lot of batteries (mostly their brand), so usually fresh, with good charge.

In time, many lessons will be learned, and some of the more complicated, but good suggestions, will be an option for the OP.





Lwiddis

Owens River area

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Posted: 01/05/22 07:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

“Hope it is a quiet inverter type. Even then, they can get tiresome to listen to, especially if your boondocking spot is quiet.”

Tiresome for you as well as your neighbors. Consider solar for recharging and using the generator as a backup.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, WindyNation 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AMP Lithium battery. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist. 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 01/05/22 08:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:


I would recommend starting out with an interstate rv/marine 12v, in the largest size to fit box, maybe group 27.

Two 6G golf cart batteries would be similar cost and store more power.

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