Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Tow Vehicles: Towing mileage/capability
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Towing mileage/capability

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
Allamakee1

Iowa

Full Member

Joined: 04/15/2016

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/09/22 07:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your concerned about mileage and entry height, I would suggest the Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel in a SUV format. In a truck, I would look at either the Chevrolet Colorado or GMC Canyon, both in the 3.0 diesel. Those would be about the same size as a Dakota, but would tow much better with better MPG. Those small diesels would be perfect for that trailer.


2010 Chevy D/A (LMM) CC-LTZ-Z71
Previous - 2014 Ram Ecodiesel Laramie

RoyJ

Vancouver, BC

Senior Member

Joined: 10/19/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/09/22 11:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Need a budget to start. But as a rough guide:

Any modern crossover with a RWD based chassis (Explorer, Grand Cherokee, etc.) can handle it with power to spare, thanks to 6/8/9/10 spd transmissions and tons of hp.

For a budget setup, late-2000s Explorer with 4.6 V8, Grand cherokee 4.7/5.7, 4runner V8 (fortune in this market), Trailblazers/Envoys, Pathfinder (v6 or the rare V8).

mkirsch

Rochester, NY

Senior Member

Joined: 04/09/2004

View Profile



Posted: 02/10/22 06:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

340K on the Yukon? You can't use that to compare because the poor thing is SLAP!! WORE!!! OUT!!!!

Of course it's going to run in lower gears, get poorer fuel mileage, have less power... Half the fuel is probably pushing past the rings into the crankcase.

You're going to run that risk with any extreme high mileage vehicle.


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

1320Fastback

Vista, Ca

Senior Member

Joined: 12/04/2016

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/10/22 09:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rexlion wrote:

A 90s era dodge diesel pickup would tow better and give better mpg. That TT has too much frontal area for a Traverse or similar with v6, based on my experience with a Highlander.


Is what I use and daily drive, a 1992 Dodge D250 5spd. No computers, no sensors, no smog check. Just a engine, a battery and a key.

Few years ago we pulled a 18' toy hauler over 4,000 miles and nailed down 14.68 MPG hand calculated.

There are many things you give up though with older vehicles. Safety is the big one.


1992 D250 Cummins 5psd
2005 Forest River T26 Toy Hauler


Bluedeacon

Iowa

New Member

Joined: 09/18/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/11/22 11:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I responded to this but apparently it didn't go through.

For the record. No, I'm not looking for something for nothing. Physics still apply. However, fuel efficiency has improved quite a bit over the years and you'd think there might be more fuel efficient options to tow 4000lbs than a full sized V8 getting 8-10 mpg.

Transmissions? I prefer manual to automatic but that's just me. CVT's I can't trust in a lawn tractor, why trust it in a car let alone a truck? Lol. Multispeeds I'm not entirely sold on - in cars anyway I see no advantage to the 8 speed in our 2017 Impala over the four speeds in the '08 Sonata or the '08 V6 Impala. SUV versus pickup - there are some perks and drawbacks to each. I prefer pickups (with a topper is nice) but at my price range quite often SUV's are less likely to have been abused than trucks.

Granted, it's hard to beat the outright towing of full size pickups - I thought perhaps with modern tech they might get better mpg towing. I was thinking that a smaller rig might be sufficient and get decent (14+) mileage even if it has to work a bit harder on steep hills. Of folks we met this summer, there was one couple towing an Rpod with a '95 Grand Caravan, perfectly happy with it; and an older lady with 2012 Escape V6 who towed a Sportsman roughly our size and weight. Around Iowa she claims to get 18 mpg or better and has been across the country with it. 12 mpg through the Rockies; I don't know what her standard for 'tows fine' is though.

Anyway - the Aerostar. We had an '87 XLT, loved it, but it went to hell at around 120k. I would be interested in another, what with Internet forums. Ironically as with other trucks, the smaller (3 L) has a higher tow rating than the 4L. Most Dakotas have higher tows and hauls than the Ram 1500's. I assume weight difference in the Dodges and weight capacity in the Ford.

Our unicorn was called Big Blue - beautiful two tone blue, trailer package, HD. The torque converter went six months in, it took four months and 300 search pages to find another. Tranny shop said tranny was ok while I had it out. Two months in it started feeling soft, we sold it. Four years later, it's had four owners and five trannys. I wonder if a 2500 trans and tc would have worked. I miss that truck. I haven't figured out how to add a pic of it.

Bluedeacon

Iowa

New Member

Joined: 09/18/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/11/22 11:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm trying to plan ahead - assuming prices of new go back down, do I buy new, or find a great body and renovate the drivetrain while the Yukon runs, and what to buy?

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/11/22 12:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^ Good to see you back on the thread!
Basically what you're saying is you're all over the board from restoring an old vehicle, to buying a gently used relic, to an old used mini van to a compact SUV, to a new full size pickup...
There is volumes of dialogue just on this forum regarding about any vehicle you can imagine and everyone's opinion about what it's capable of or how it does or doesn't perform.
That seems like a good place to start.
Right now, any suggestions are people just chasing their tails trying to figure out where your brain is at.

The one pertinent piece of advice I can think of, is considering you're smack dab in the rust belt, if you're going old, go west or south to find a clean one.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29

Thunderbolt

North Branch, Mn USA

Senior Member

Joined: 07/03/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/11/22 01:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

And I’ve never seen a 95 “1500HD”. I’d go as far as saying they don’t exist. While icbw, that designation and the corresponding heavier chassis with the 1500hd badging didn’t start until the gmt800 models.


My 98 1500 had the Heavy Duty chassis package. This consisted of a 14 bolt semi floating rear differential, bigger rear brakes and an extra rear leaf spring. This upped the GVWR from the standard 6,200 to 6,600. I think this was available in 95 as well. The truck was not called a 1500HD though.


Bryan
2003 2500HD Ext. cab short box
6.0 liter 4.10 gears, Nelson performance PCM 293,000 miles
98 K1500 4x4 heavy duty 1/2 ton (Sold)
6,600lb GVWR 5,280lbs on the scale empty
14 bolt rear diff. 3:73 , Tranny and oil coolers
380,000 miles.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

Senior Member

Joined: 04/08/2002

View Profile



Posted: 02/11/22 03:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thunderbolt wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

And I’ve never seen a 95 “1500HD”. I’d go as far as saying they don’t exist. While icbw, that designation and the corresponding heavier chassis with the 1500hd badging didn’t start until the gmt800 models.


My 98 1500 had the Heavy Duty chassis package. This consisted of a 14 bolt semi floating rear differential, bigger rear brakes and an extra rear leaf spring. This upped the GVWR from the standard 6,200 to 6,600. I think this was available in 95 as well. The truck was not called a 1500HD though.
I know there was a 1500HD in 2001.Do not recall just what it had in it.


Huntindog
100% boondocking
2021 Grand Design Momentum 398M
2 bathrooms, no waiting
104 gal grey, 104 black,158 fresh
FullBodyPaint, 3,8Kaxles, DiscBrakes
17.5LRH commercial tires
1860watts solar,800 AH Battleborn batterys
2020 Silverado HighCountryC CD/A 4X4 DRW



Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/11/22 04:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The actual model name 1500HD trucks were the GMT800s and basically they were the 99-2000 model 2500s once the 2500 hd came out in 01.
Like he ^ said. GMT 400s did offer 1500s with the heavier axle and spring. Never saw many of them, and I believe they were 6 lug 14 bolt SF axles. You could call them HD, just not their official designation.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Towing mileage/capability
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.