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profdant139

Southern California

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Posted: 04/15/22 05:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I did some research and found that many experts say keep 'em charged because they self-discharge. But like all internet research, the answer you get depends on the question you ask. So now I don't know what to believe.

I will say this: although anecdotes are not evidence, the real-life testimonials from folks who use lots of batteries all the time are pretty persuasive. So, if someone says "we have a fleet of farm vehicles and we never keep the batteries on chargers during the winter," that's an opinion worth taking seriously.


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StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 04/15/22 06:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gjac wrote:

I believe keeping your batteries plugged in 24/7 eats your plates away quicker than leaving your MH unplugged and recharging when the SOC reaches 80-90%.


you mean I could have got longer than 14 years out of my 6V batteries if I unplugd the 5th wheel when I wasnt using it?

in all seriously though if you have a quality 4 stage charger you can leave it plugged in, check water ever couple months and you will be fine unless you buy a defective battery.. I have had that happen before.

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austinjenna

Columbus, Ohio

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Posted: 04/16/22 06:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The batteryminder type of maintainers are meant to be on all the time without hurting the battery. At the end of the season I pull the battery, clean it up, make sure its topped off with water and put it on the maintainer in the garage and it stays there until the beginning of the year.

The batterymonder+ which is the type I use is supposed to de-sulhper the plates. I use this type on my bikes and summer cars as well, no issues ever with them.

They are meant to be hooked up and forgot about.



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Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 04/16/22 10:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fisherman wrote:

Gjac wrote:

I believe keeping your batteries plugged in 24/7 eats your plates away quicker than leaving your MH unplugged and recharging when the SOC reaches 80-90%.


And where does belief come from pray tell.
When the charger is on constantly a chemical action is taking place that reacts with the lead plates and sheds lead from them. I dry camp 95% of the time so my 2 6v Sam's Club batteries only get charged after a week of camping. They were purchased in 2007 and still good. My first set of Trojans only lasted 4 years under constant charge, which seems to be typical. Battery maintenance is more than just keeping your batteries plugged in 24/7. I realize most batteries die from sulfation so a battery maintainer prevents an early death, but I thing equalizing and desulfating every so often is better for battery life.

austinjenna

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Posted: 04/18/22 05:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

But a lot of maintainers do de-sulpahte the battery. This is from the Batteryminder plus website.

The BatteryMINDer Plus is a 3-mode charger-maintainer-desulfator that extends performance and life of all types and sizes of 12 Volt lead acid batteries, including all starter, deep cycle, maintenance-free, sealed AGM, gelled or dry-type batteries, regardless of size or make. The Model 12117 automatically dissolves harmful power-robbing sulfation using safe, low voltage, patented high-frequency pulse technology

Skibane

San Antonio, TX

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Posted: 04/18/22 06:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

profdant139 wrote:

I will say this: although anecdotes are not evidence, the real-life testimonials from folks who use lots of batteries all the time are pretty persuasive. So, if someone says "we have a fleet of farm vehicles and we never keep the batteries on chargers during the winter," that's an opinion worth taking seriously.


It's persuasive if you're also operating a fleet of similar farm vehicles in a similar climate.

Not all vehicles have the same amount of parasitic loads present in them. Some vehicles will discharge a battery in just a few weeks of inactivity; others can sit idle for many months and still have plenty of juice in the battery.

And, as previously mentioned, any given battery's self-discharge rate varies tremendously (exponentially!) with ambient temperature.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 04/18/22 08:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gjac wrote:

Fisherman wrote:

Gjac wrote:

I believe keeping your batteries plugged in 24/7 eats your plates away quicker than leaving your MH unplugged and recharging when the SOC reaches 80-90%.


And where does belief come from pray tell.
When the charger is on constantly a chemical action is taking place that reacts with the lead plates and sheds lead from them. I dry camp 95% of the time so my 2 6v Sam's Club batteries only get charged after a week of camping. They were purchased in 2007 and still good. My first set of Trojans only lasted 4 years under constant charge, which seems to be typical. Battery maintenance is more than just keeping your batteries plugged in 24/7. I realize most batteries die from sulfation so a battery maintainer prevents an early death, but I thing equalizing and desulfating every so often is better for battery life.


That is why you change out the rv's cheep charger for a quality one that does the same things. if you leave the factory charger section in there you will kill batteries quick, if you change it out for a good one then you end up like me making a set of 4 GC batteries last for 16 years while doing heavy camping and using microwaves, furnace, electric coffee pot and so on on the inverter quite a bit. if all I was using was lights and the rv furnace I probably would have been able to sneak 20 years out of them..... all I used to do with thoes was check the water twice a year and plug it in as soon as I got home.

Steve

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 04/19/22 06:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

austinjenna wrote:

But a lot of maintainers do de-sulpahte the battery. This is from the Batteryminder plus website.

The BatteryMINDer Plus is a 3-mode charger-maintainer-desulfator that extends performance and life of all types and sizes of 12 Volt lead acid batteries, including all starter, deep cycle, maintenance-free, sealed AGM, gelled or dry-type batteries, regardless of size or make. The Model 12117 automatically dissolves harmful power-robbing sulfation using safe, low voltage, patented high-frequency pulse technology
I'm not familiar with Battery Minder plus but does it go into a desulfating mode automatically over a 4-month period of absence or do you have to be there to program it manually to desulfate?

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 04/19/22 07:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting thread about half the posters said charge it and remove the neg cable and let it sit and half said keep batteries on a charger. Both methods work, not sure what the OP learned from this or concluded.

Scottiemom

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Posted: 04/19/22 07:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had battery disconnects on my two vehicles. When I left in the motorhome for more than a month, I throw the blade on the disconnect. When I return, I reconnect the blade switch. It has always worked on my two vehicles and they start right up. I recently replaced the one vehicle with a new Honda Odyssey. When I lifted the hood, I couldn't even see the battery, there is so much stuff screwed on top. So I asked my mechanic. He said not to use a disconnect because there is a small watch type battery that powers the ecm and if that were to go dead from the battery being disconnected, I would have nothing but problems with the battery vs the computer. He recommended a Schumacher 1.5A battery maintainer. I bought it and he installed it yesterday. It is forever mounted under my hood and the plug sticks up within easy reach of an extension cord. This device is specifically for vehicles left in storage and I am hoping it works as advertised.

Dale


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